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6

I would suggest using the utility xkill in this case. If it didn't work, it would at least probably give some information explaining why.


4

You can achieve this in any terminal emulator by the simple expedient of arranging for the program not to exit without user confirmation. Tell the terminal to run terminal_shell_wrapper which is a script containing something like #!/bin/sh if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then "${SHELL:-sh}"; else "$@"; fi echo "The command exited with status $?. Press Enter to close the ...


3

screen -Q windows will print out your active screen windows with index & title.


3

First of all, the fact that it is not shown in the first few lines of top does not mean that aMule is not running. In fact, since it has crashed, it is likely to be there in a zombie state, using next to no resources so not seeing it in top is normal. Instead of top, you should use ps or pgrep to find running processed: pgrep amule or ps aux | grep amule ...


3

Its reasonable to expect PlayOnLinux to be a little heavier than native. PlayOnLinux relies on wine, which brings in a whole layer of virtualization overhead. Steam on the otherhand is more of a grab-bag of some native games and some wine-wrappered games, so some will run smoother than others, depending on who/how it was ported. Additionally, the ...


2

hbdgaf's answer above was very close (on ubuntu 12.04), but instead of "true", you need to use "yes" to tell it to maximize. So, inside the applications block in /home/(your username)/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml, add the following block and it will work: <applications> <application name="lxterminal"> ...


2

xterm -hold from $(man xterm): -hold Turn on the hold resource, i.e., xterm will not immediately destroy its window when the shell command completes. It will wait until you use the window manager to destroy/kill the window, or if you use the menu entries that send a signal, e.g., HUP or KILL. Running xterm --help, one of the lines is -/+hold ...


2

A program that monitors window creation doesn't come to mind, but you don't need that. You can run wmctrl -l in a loop or on a timer (e.g. sleep 10; wmctrl -l) and then start the fullscreen application and record its window properties. If you want more information, you can do something like sleep 10; xprop After 10 seconds, the mouse cursor will change; ...


2

You have few options: if this is possible configure application itself via config file or some clickable menu. certain applications support geometry changing from .Xresources (or .Xdefaults) file. If neither of the above is possible then you need to use external tool to change window properties. One of the better choice can be wmctrl software - you can ...


2

Window IDs are given out by the X server. The window manager doesn't get a say. Window IDs encode the client that the window belongs to in the upper 12 bits. The lower 12 bits are assigned sequentially at first, but if an intermediate number becomes free, it can be reused. So comparing window IDs does not give a reliable indication of which window was ...


1

My guess is that they are like PIDs, allocated in ascending order, except when they are not: PIDs wrap around. Let us assume (for now) that they only go up. What would happen on a system that is running for a very long time? Id will get too big, or ID size must be allowed to grow, 32bit, 64bit, 128bit … If they had to go up only then they could run out, ...


1

Some common ones for KDE4 are in ~/.kde4/share/config/kwinrc. But some configs are app-controlled. Many apps have their config files in the same dir.


1

why not try guake? It's always running in background,and when you want to use it,press the hot key it will show up! For more detail click here


1

I assume you find the fact that the window starts so small annoying, and do not actually want to programatically change the window size. The shortcut to maximize any window is alt+F5. If that is too inconvenient you can change it via the system settings, or just drag the window up against the top edge of the screen, after making sure you have that activated ...


1

I found xdotool to be flaky/buggy, sometimes it closes the foreground window instead of the one that should be closed. This seems to be due to the way that keys are sent after bringing the window to the foreground instead of directly sending window events, and it's a very annoying issue. I suggest using wmctrl, which directly closes a window without sending ...


1

I had this exact same problem. So I wrote a shell script that I bound to a hotkey. When I hit the hotkey, it gets the window id of the currently active window (the one that has focus). Then it gives you a popup dialog where you enter the title you want that window to have. Then every time that window changes its name, it changes it back to the title you ...



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