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6

I would suggest using the utility xkill in this case. If it didn't work, it would at least probably give some information explaining why.


3

First of all, the fact that it is not shown in the first few lines of top does not mean that aMule is not running. In fact, since it has crashed, it is likely to be there in a zombie state, using next to no resources so not seeing it in top is normal. Instead of top, you should use ps or pgrep to find running processed: pgrep amule or ps aux | grep amule ...


3

Its reasonable to expect PlayOnLinux to be a little heavier than native. PlayOnLinux relies on wine, which brings in a whole layer of virtualization overhead. Steam on the otherhand is more of a grab-bag of some native games and some wine-wrappered games, so some will run smoother than others, depending on who/how it was ported. Additionally, the ...


2

I also asked this question on stackoverflow and got a good answer that I marked as the correct one and upvoted: http://stackoverflow.com/a/26060527/1707904 This applies also to compiz. There are a couple of ways you can get these informations in some ways: wnckprop --xid=$(xdotool getactivewindow) Otherwise, you can just mix the Absolute value you ...


2

hbdgaf's answer above was very close (on ubuntu 12.04), but instead of "true", you need to use "yes" to tell it to maximize. So, inside the applications block in /home/(your username)/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml, add the following block and it will work: <applications> <application name="lxterminal"> ...


2

You can achieve this in any terminal emulator by the simple expedient of arranging for the program not to exit without user confirmation. Tell the terminal to run terminal_shell_wrapper which is a script containing something like #!/bin/sh if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then "${SHELL:-sh}"; else "$@"; fi echo "The command exited with status $?. Press Enter to close the ...


1

Some common ones for KDE4 are in ~/.kde4/share/config/kwinrc. But some configs are app-controlled. Many apps have their config files in the same dir.


1

xterm -hold from $(man xterm): -hold Turn on the hold resource, i.e., xterm will not immediately destroy its window when the shell command completes. It will wait until you use the window manager to destroy/kill the window, or if you use the menu entries that send a signal, e.g., HUP or KILL.


1

I assume you find the fact that the window starts so small annoying, and do not actually want to programatically change the window size. The shortcut to maximize any window is alt+F5. If that is too inconvenient you can change it via the system settings, or just drag the window up against the top edge of the screen, after making sure you have that activated ...


1

I had this exact same problem. So I wrote a shell script that I bound to a hotkey. When I hit the hotkey, it gets the window id of the currently active window (the one that has focus). Then it gives you a popup dialog where you enter the title you want that window to have. Then every time that window changes its name, it changes it back to the title you ...


1

I found a related question on Ask Ubuntu which sort of did the trick for me. Instructions for the whole process, including creating the "gap" between monitors (works at least on Ubuntu 14.04): Find out the current total screen size (assuming there's currently no virtual gap between monitors): $ xrandr | grep Screen Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current2048 ...


1

To get the Window ID in my program, I have the program set the title to something unique, then have the program start wmctrl and parse its output (and not the shell script that started the program), and then report on the Window ID (most often via a file). Since the program doesn't continue until the windows are open, you will never have to wait to long. ...


1

The soft way to request an X11 application to close its window and possibly then exit is to send it a WM_DELETE_WINDOW message. Xdotool doesn't appear to have a way to do this. You can do it in Perl with X11::Protocol::WM. Untested: perl -MX11::Protocol -MX11::Protocol::WM -e '$X = X11::Protocol::new(); X11::Protocol::WM::set_wm_protocol($X, ...



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