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13

Here's a very short rough characterization: Display manager: The program that provides you a graphical login and then starts your session. Runs as root or dedicated user. Session manager: The program that actually controls your session. Runs under your account. Windowing system: The complete GUI drawing/control system. Describes not a component in itself, ...


10

Is a "Display Manager" the same thing as a "Session Manager"? Not quite, but they often overlap in implementation. A Display Manager just logs the user in and start a session, which consists of all the programs that run from the moment you log in to when you log out from the computer again. Commonly the display manager will start a Desktop Environment ...


9

A windowing system is a software component that provides windows for applications to draw in and can display these windows on the screen. The X Window System is the standard windowing system on Unix systems; outside Mac OS X, it doesn't really have competition (this may change if Wayland or Mir become viable). The X Window System has a client-server ...


5

Is a "Display Manager" the same thing as a "Session Manager"? Answer: No they are not the same. The session managermanages your session, and the display manager is responsible for providing you with a login interface. Likewise, is a "Windowing system" the same thing as a "Window manager"? Answer: No they are different. The window mangager sits on top ...


5

Sounds like you are looking for some tiling window manager. Have a look at the feature comparison. Which one is the best is really a matter of taste. They mainly differ in the kind of possible configuration, like turning off window decoration and default window mode.


5

Have a look at /etc/X11/Xsession.d/50x11-common_determine-startup: if [ -z "$STARTUP" ]; then if [ -x /usr/bin/x-session-manager ]; then STARTUP=x-session-manager elif [ -x /usr/bin/x-window-manager ]; then STARTUP=x-window-manager elif [ -x /usr/bin/x-terminal-emulator ]; then STARTUP=x-terminal-emulator fi fi So basically, this tries ...


4

For some apps (e.g. file-roller) this can be fixed by changing the StartupNotify key value from true to false in their respective .desktop files (e.g. /usr/share/applications/file-roller.desktop). The above doesn't work for all apps (e.g. nautilus) so another way to fix the problem would be a custom shell extension; just to give you an idea, you could ...


3

I think the i3 window manager might be something for you: The i3 tiling window manager is a nice modern tiling window manager for GNU/Linux and BSD operating systems. It supports tiling, stacking, tabs, virtual desktops, and multiple monitors. You can do almost everything from the keyboard, or mix up keyboard and mouse. Most linux distributions have it ...


3

evilwm is one of the most minimalistic window manager


3

There's no similar mechanism, because the reasons are completely different. A garbled text terminal comes from having multiple sources all writing to the terminal, with no coordination between them. So you end up with text where it doesn't belong, which is solved by making the application whose text you do want to see redisplay what it wants. xrefresh is ...


3

What you refer to as a windowing system is more commonly referred to as a display server. The differences between display servers are well documented. But, the difference between a display server and a window manager is in the job that they perform. A display server handles displaying graphical applications and relaying input and output from graphical ...


3

I am not sure why your googling did not come up with this MPWM git repository, but that should help you on your way. From the README there: MPWM is the multi-pointer window manager, a MPX-aware window manager that supports window operations from multiple devices. MPWM is a proof-of-concept, not a real window manager. It's lacking most features that you'd ...


3

Since version 4.8, something like that is part of i3 and there's a detailed guide on the website, but here's a short version: Once you've set up a workspace like you want it to be, save its layout with i3-save-tree --workspace <whichever workspace you want> > ~/.i3/layout-ws-<xyz>.json into the file ~/.i3/layout-ws-xyz.json. You'll then ...


2

A desktop environment (DE) is a combination of programs that define the interaction of the user and his applications. Examples: Ubuntu's Unity, GNOME, KDE A desktop session is a running instance of a desktop environment. A GDM session is a session of the X display manager GDM (Gnome Display Manager), which mainly allows you to choose a desktop environment ...


2

It closes immediately because you aren't sending anything to it. You need to specify the output for the pretty print : dynamicLogWithPP $ sjanssenPP {ppOutput = hPutStrLn xmproc},


2

Presuming you have twm installed (yum install xorg-x11-twm), create a shell script in $HOME called .xinitrc: #!/bin/sh twm That's it. I believe this must be executable (chmod a+x .xinitrc). You will now be able to startx from the console and get twm (don't invoke this script yourself directly). If you use a display manager (graphical login), it should ...


2

If you run xprop and click on a window, you see that the icon is among the "metadata" assigned to the window structure in your X server, under name and type _NET_WM_ICON(CARDINAL). These parameters can be changed by other X applications, for instance, window managers write and change a whole bunch of stuff in there. The key function will be XChangeProperty. ...


2

Have a look at smartSpacing: (see Xmonad Spacing Docs) Surrounds all windows with blank space, except when the window is the only visible window on the current workspace. I.e., changing tiled = spacing 5 $ Tall nmaster delta ratio to tiled = smartSpacing 5 $ Tall nmaster delta ratio should to the trick.


1

On Linux, with a window manager that follows the Extended Window Manager Hints (EWMH) you can do this by setting the above property. Linux Mint Cinnameon and Mate desktop environments both incorporate elements in the stack that handle the EWMH functionality. What you can do using the window title is use the following command: wmctrl -r :SELECT: -b ...


1

You are looking for the Matchbox window manager, it has one full screen window open at once (as you specify) and opens any new ones over it until you close them. It is very light weight and ideal for things like PDAs or set top media boxes. The only exception is is allows small popups like the file chooser to open not full screen as they may not be ...


1

I think this is exactly what I wanted, PyWO. Only depends on python-xlib and claims to work with any EWMH compatable manager (openbox included!). Have not tested yet, but these are the features I wanted (drop in extension as opposed to a clobber everything replacement). Pure py WMs seem cool, but I dont want to manage everything, only those few windowing ...


1

Too long for a comment. Depending on how much effort you want to put into it, looking at PLWM or Qtile might be worthwhile. Then there is also PyWM, which seems to be "stable" at this moment. Last but not least, looking around on the internet doesn't seem to be that hopeless: for example this blog looks as possibly useful. If you are not insisting on ...


1

On Unity the default window resize shortcut is Alt+F8. You can check this by running: gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings begin-resize The default value being ['<Alt>F8']. I checked KDE out as well, but they have no keyboard shortcut for window resizing, that I could find.


1

You are looking for tiling window managers having non-tiling windows capabilities. Maybe the answer is not getting something working out-of-the-box, but using something like openbox or fluxbox (which allows to use everything you put in your description, and being mouse-friendly) plus an add-on or program running on top of that - for example, check the ...


1

Unless you are intending on creating XMonad extensions you shouldn't need much Haskell. Looking through my xmonad.hs almost everything in there is either an import statement (which looks exactly the same as in python), or copied from other configs. So if you start with the default config and fiddle with things you should be fine. If you do need to extend ...


1

Python has pretty sketchy looking xlib support -- e.g this-- so I would not have thought so. However, perusing this list reveals there's a least one, qtile. The arch linux wiki has a bit of an introduction, since there doesn't otherwise appear to be one online (i.e., it will probably be useful to you regardless of whether you use arch or not).


1

Question is old, but for anyone reading it: escape grave definekey top Insert readkey root definekey root Insert link grave This will effectively change C-t to the grave key. I don't know what the windows key is called. Don't remember where I got this, but it works.


1

As far as I know, the only supported values in Mutter are "menu" "minimize" "maximize" "spacer" and "close". It doesn't appear to be possible to add a button for always on top.


1

The problem is that the graphics driver xserver-xorg-video-vmware was compiled without 3D acceleration support. This has already been fixed for newer releases, and is in debian jessie. The Solution Recompile the package with 3D acceleration support install dependencies for VMware Tools sudo apt-get install linux-headers-$(uname -r) make gcc Install ...


1

I had this exact same problem. So I wrote a shell script that I bound to a hotkey. When I hit the hotkey, it gets the window id of the currently active window (the one that has focus). Then it gives you a popup dialog where you enter the title you want that window to have. Then every time that window changes its name, it changes it back to the title you ...



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