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12

Here's a very short rough characterization: Display manager: The program that provides you a graphical login and then starts your session. Runs as root or dedicated user. Session manager: The program that actually controls your session. Runs under your account. Windowing system: The complete GUI drawing/control system. Describes not a component in itself, ...


9

While you ask for window management system you mention features like find/replace, file management etc. which is usually not part of Window Management, but a Desktop Environment, so you should be looking for separate tools for that. For general tools I would suggest having a look at http://suckless.org, they provide nice list of "do one thing and do it well" ...


9

Is a "Display Manager" the same thing as a "Session Manager"? Not quite, but they often overlap in implementation. A Display Manager just logs the user in and start a session, which consists of all the programs that run from the moment you log in to when you log out from the computer again. Commonly the display manager will start a Desktop Environment ...


8

A windowing system is a software component that provides windows for applications to draw in and can display these windows on the screen. The X Window System is the standard windowing system on Unix systems; outside Mac OS X, it doesn't really have competition (this may change if Wayland or Mir become viable). The X Window System has a client-server ...


5

Have a look at /etc/X11/Xsession.d/50x11-common_determine-startup: if [ -z "$STARTUP" ]; then if [ -x /usr/bin/x-session-manager ]; then STARTUP=x-session-manager elif [ -x /usr/bin/x-window-manager ]; then STARTUP=x-window-manager elif [ -x /usr/bin/x-terminal-emulator ]; then STARTUP=x-terminal-emulator fi fi So basically, this tries ...


5

Sounds like you are looking for some tiling window manager. Have a look at the feature comparison. Which one is the best is really a matter of taste. They mainly differ in the kind of possible configuration, like turning off window decoration and default window mode.


4

This question may be old, but I think I have found the perfect solution. Go to System Settings > Window Behaviour > Window Rules Add a new Rule Mark all window properties as 'Unimportant' Select all 'Window' types like in the screenshot In the tab 'Size & Position', tick 'Activities' and configure it as 'Apply initially' and 'All Activites', like in ...


4

For some apps (e.g. file-roller) this can be fixed by changing the StartupNotify key value from true to false in their respective .desktop files (e.g. /usr/share/applications/file-roller.desktop). The above doesn't work for all apps (e.g. nautilus) so another way to fix the problem would be a custom shell extension; just to give you an idea, you could ...


4

Is a "Display Manager" the same thing as a "Session Manager"? Answer: No they are not the same. The session managermanages your session, and the display manager is responsible for providing you with a login interface. Likewise, is a "Windowing system" the same thing as a "Window manager"? Answer: No they are different. The window mangager sits on top ...


3

I am not sure why your googling did not come up with this MPWM git repository, but that should help you on your way. From the README there: MPWM is the multi-pointer window manager, a MPX-aware window manager that supports window operations from multiple devices. MPWM is a proof-of-concept, not a real window manager. It's lacking most features that you'd ...


3

Since version 4.8, something like that is part of i3 and there's a detailed guide on the website, but here's a short version: Once you've set up a workspace like you want it to be, save its layout with i3-save-tree --workspace <whichever workspace you want> > ~/.i3/layout-ws-<xyz>.json into the file ~/.i3/layout-ws-xyz.json. You'll then ...


3

What you refer to as a windowing system is more commonly referred to as a display server. The differences between display servers are well documented. But, the difference between a display server and a window manager is in the job that they perform. A display server handles displaying graphical applications and relaying input and output from graphical ...


3

You are looking for (unsurprisingly) awesome.client.cycle. Add this to your rc.lua: awful.key({ modkey, "Shift" }, "y", function () awful.client.cycle(true) end) Then you can press Alt+Shift+y to get the desired behavior. The lone boolean parameter determines cycle direction.


3

That dot is to stick window visible on all workspaces.


3

evilwm is one of the most minimalistic window manager


3

I think the i3 window manager might be something for you: The i3 tiling window manager is a nice modern tiling window manager for GNU/Linux and BSD operating systems. It supports tiling, stacking, tabs, virtual desktops, and multiple monitors. You can do almost everything from the keyboard, or mix up keyboard and mouse. Most linux distributions have it ...


2

there is a hex hack for the libflashplayer.so around, you can try http://simonmott.co.uk/blog/view/11 for a possible version. the idea is to open libflashplayer.so or libgcflashplayer.so and search it for _NET_ACTIVE_WINDOW and replace one of the letters, for example to _AET_ACTIVE_WINDOW that will fix the issue of closing fullscreen flash when losing ...


2

There is screen to do that with (virtual) terminal applications, and there is xpra for X11.


2

Use small footprint Display Manager. SLIM With this display manager, some manual configuration is needed. Please refer to their official document and write your /etc/slim.conf and ~/.xinitrc. The command you should put in your ~/.xinitrc to start LXDE is: exec startlxde The above is coming from : http://wiki.lxde.org/en/Debian It supports autologin.


2

You must give the full path : startx /usr/bin/xmonad What happens when you run startx xmonad is xmonad is treated like an argument for the default client : xterm. So xterm xmonad is ran.


2

The symptoms arise from two distinct issues here: The compositor: use something more recent like Compton in this case, with the following last options if supported by your hardware: exec --no-startup-id compton -cCGb --backend glx --vsync opengl The fact that compositors are not officially supported by this window manager and because of the way i3 ...


2

It closes immediately because you aren't sending anything to it. You need to specify the output for the pretty print : dynamicLogWithPP $ sjanssenPP {ppOutput = hPutStrLn xmproc},


2

Presuming you have twm installed (yum install xorg-x11-twm), create a shell script in $HOME called .xinitrc: #!/bin/sh twm That's it. I believe this must be executable (chmod a+x .xinitrc). You will now be able to startx from the console and get twm (don't invoke this script yourself directly). If you use a display manager (graphical login), it should ...


1

On Unity the default window resize shortcut is Alt+F8. You can check this by running: gsettings get org.gnome.desktop.wm.keybindings begin-resize The default value being ['<Alt>F8']. I checked KDE out as well, but they have no keyboard shortcut for window resizing, that I could find.


1

A desktop environment (DE) is a combination of programs that define the interaction of the user and his applications. Examples: Ubuntu's Unity, GNOME, KDE A desktop session is a running instance of a desktop environment. A GDM session is a session of the X display manager GDM (Gnome Display Manager), which mainly allows you to choose a desktop environment ...


1

You are looking for tiling window managers having non-tiling windows capabilities. Maybe the answer is not getting something working out-of-the-box, but using something like openbox or fluxbox (which allows to use everything you put in your description, and being mouse-friendly) plus an add-on or program running on top of that - for example, check the ...


1

Unless you are intending on creating XMonad extensions you shouldn't need much Haskell. Looking through my xmonad.hs almost everything in there is either an import statement (which looks exactly the same as in python), or copied from other configs. So if you start with the default config and fiddle with things you should be fine. If you do need to extend ...


1

Python has pretty sketchy looking xlib support -- e.g this-- so I would not have thought so. However, perusing this list reveals there's a least one, qtile. The arch linux wiki has a bit of an introduction, since there doesn't otherwise appear to be one online (i.e., it will probably be useful to you regardless of whether you use arch or not).


1

Question is old, but for anyone reading it: escape grave definekey top Insert readkey root definekey root Insert link grave This will effectively change C-t to the grave key. I don't know what the windows key is called. Don't remember where I got this, but it works.


1

Based on the ChangeEscapeKeyHOWTO and Enjoying More Screen Space with Ratpoison, I think putting escape Super_L in your ~/.ratpoisonrc should do the trick.



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