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8

A window manager is what runs after you've logged in. A graphical login screen is called a display manager. To set up a display manager in Arch, consult the wiki. It boils down to installing a display manager with pacman, and then systemctl enable [your chosen display manager]


6

While you ask for window management system you mention features like find/replace, file management etc. which is usually not part of Window Management, but a Desktop Environment, so you should be looking for separate tools for that. For general tools I would suggest having a look at http://suckless.org, they provide nice list of "do one thing and do it well" ...


4

Yes, Gnome and KDE provide some of their own keyboard shortcuts in addition to the ones provided by their respective WMs. However, this may not mean what you think. The fact that Fn + UpArrow produces the keysym XF86AudioRaiseVolume is mainly due to your laptop's keyboard. You can verify this by using xev again (in the Openbox environment); It should have ...


3

According to the Arch Wiki i3 page, to autostart an application on a specific workspace, you use i3-msg: exec --no-startup-id i3-msg 'workspace 1:Web; exec /usr/bin/firefox'


3

You could try Devil's Pie: A totally crack-ridden program for freaks and weirdos who want precise control over what windows do when they appear. If you want all XChat windows to be on desktop 3, in the lower-left, at 40% transparency, you can do it. Here is a tutorial, covering the basics. Since Devil's Pie is no longer maintained, someone made a ...


3

Generally the most lightweight GUIs are fluxbox, openbox or blackbox and there are some that are still quite light but not as pure as the mentioned *box window managers, those are xfce and lxde. Now, first you should check if these are compatible with 9.04 (they should be). Afterwards try them out in a virtualbox, as Anthon already said, to get used to the ...


3

The answer to your first question is yes: the only things that change are basically the graphical desktop applications, the base system (e.g. kernel) remains the same. As per your second question, there might be minor interferences between the two DEs, but all in all, KDE and then XFCE should equal XFCE then KDE. I'd suggest you experiment and see for ...


3

I wouldn't bother trying to write a new launcher. Just configure your startup scripts to do what you need: Model the different tasks as different users on the gentoo box: usenetflix, playgame etc., Use a X Display Manager to create a nice login screen. I'm sure you can find variants that will let you create big friendly icon for all your tasks. In the ...


2

This question may be old, but I think I have found the perfect solution. Go to System Settings > Window Behaviour > Window Rules Add a new Rule Mark all window properties as 'Unimportant' Select all 'Window' types like in the screenshot In the tab 'Size & Position', tick 'Activities' and configure it as 'Apply initially' and 'All Activites', like in ...


2

Make sure that Skype is capitalized. I use className =? "Skype" --> doShift "8" and that works, but if I leave Skype in lowercase it doesn't. I don't use Thunderbird, but perhaps it is also a class name issue. It looks like you should be using "Thunderbird-bin". http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-863092.html


2

There is a list of your options here on the debian.org website: https://wiki.debian.org/DesktopEnvironment excerpt from that page Desktop Environments The GNOME project provides two things: The GNOME desktop environment, an intuitive and attractive desktop for users, and the GNOME development platform, an extensive framework for building ...


2

In your ~/.config/openbox/autostart there are the following lines. ## Group start: ## 1. nitrogen - restores wallpaper ## 2. compositor - start ## 3. sleep - give compositor time to start ## 4. tint2 panel (\ nitrogen --restore && \ cb-compositor --start && \ sleep 2s && \ tint2 \ ) & This part is most likely the cause for your ...


2

You are looking for (unsurprisingly) awesome.client.cycle. Add this to your rc.lua: awful.key({ modkey, "Shift" }, "y", function () awful.client.cycle(true) end) Then you can press Alt+Shift+y to get the desired behavior. The lone boolean parameter determines cycle direction.


2

Use small footprint Display Manager. SLIM With this display manager, some manual configuration is needed. Please refer to their official document and write your /etc/slim.conf and ~/.xinitrc. The command you should put in your ~/.xinitrc to start LXDE is: exec startlxde The above is coming from : http://wiki.lxde.org/en/Debian It supports autologin.


1

Detecting windows on the current desktop, and resizing them can both be done using wmctrl To list all the windows you can use: wmctrl -l A quick example to resize the current active window to a size of 500 x 500 at position 0 0 would be: wmctrl -r :ACTIVE: -e 0,0,0,500,500 Finally, if you want to get the current screen size to help with your tiling ...


1

Is this a question for FVWM1 or FVWM2? Here is how I added a custom button of an arrow pointing down to my FVWM1 .fvwmrc file: ButtonStyle : 1 8 40x20@1 40x50@1 20x50@1 50x80@1 80x50@0 60x50@0 60x20@0 40x20@1 This makes, in the upper left corner of all of the windows, an arrow pointing down. Now, it's also important that this button is visible, so we ...


1

Ok... after reading TFM I found the answer, at least for Debian. According to the debian docs on locale, the default system wide locale is set in /etc/profile. After adding a line export LANG="en_US.utf8" all worked as it should. The docs indicate that setting this value in /etc/default/locale should be enough, but it also mentions the /etc/profile as an ...


1

That looks like good old twm, which a lot of X systems will use as their Window manager when installed in "minimal" mode. It is possible to make windows to launch applications and what not in these old school Window managers, but, in the classic UNIX tradition, it requires editing text files to pull off. The file to edit is ~/.twmrc or, equivalently, ...


1

Installing multiple DE's and such shouldn't alter the system in a way that affects any of the others much -- e.g., installing GNOME will not step on KDE's toes. Installing multiple display managers (the GUI login: KDM, GDM, XDM, etc.) may create a hassle, but I don't think you need to install GDM in order to install GNOME, and so on. They probably don't ...


1

One middle path for window managers is [twm][1], which I believe comes with the X11 source distribution. I've never found a distro that didn't have it, *BSD, Solaris included. twm is actually very configurable, so you can probably get to where you want to be very rapidly.


1

Most distros use LightDM for for Gnome3 I believe (Kubuntu user myself so I'm making a few assumptions here). If you are using Ubuntu then the AwesomeWM package has a bug ATM. https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/awesome/+bug/1094811 To fix this, the folder /usr/share/xsessions/ contains a *.desktop file which is used to launch your WMs. You simply ...


1

There is a way to turn off this behavior in Terminal, which is sufficient: from Terminal's Edit menu, select Keyboard Shortcuts. The topmost option is Enable Menu Access Keys. Toggle this option OFF. (Incidentally, ControlCenter > Hardware > SystemInformation > OperatingSystem > CurrentSession > DesktopEnvironment will tell you what window manager you're ...


1

Is there a window manager, easy to install on Debian, that uses very little resources? Window managers in general do not use that much in the way of resources. Although the NC10 has relatively poor specs, any stand alone window manager should be fine, so do not choose on that basis. However, it is very important you understand the difference between a ...


1

The Arch Wiki has a typically detailed page listing almost all of the window managers that run on X, including a brief description and links to their home pages. Additionally, there is another page that has a helpful comparison of tiling window managers, which may help you narrow down your choice of a lightweight, configurable window manager.


1

If you run the command visudo you can add a rule so that others can run wireshark using elevated credentials as root, without having to do too much work. $ visudo And add this rule to the end: someuser ALL=/usr/bin/wireshark Save this file and you should be able to invoke wireshark and get a a GUI dialog asking for the password with this command: $ ...


1

Sounds like something potentially with your keyboard or your installation. I use both of the following in Gnome: Alt+Tab to cycle from left to right Alt+Shift+Tab to cycle from right to left This article is Ubuntu specific but should be applicable to your situation on RHEL6 non the less. gconf-editor Double check that the preferences are set so that ...


1

You could do something like: xdotool search --onlyvisible . behave %@ focus getwindowgeometry | while read x id && read x && read x; do eval "$(xprop -notype -id "$id" \ 8s '=$0\n' WM_CLASS \ 32a '="$0+"\n' _NET_WM_STATE)" [ "$WM_CLASS" = gnome-terminal ] && [ "$_NET_WM_STATE" = ...


1

I would go for Xubuntu, it is lightweight and official. Download the CD image from here. It should run in 192Mb of RAM. If you have the change setup a local virtual machine (VM) with 9.04 to try things out before potentially breaking your VPS. After you get that running do Then setup ssh so you can ssh from your VM to VPS (I assume you the server already ...


1

Adding the following rule to your rc.lua config file (in ~/.config/awesome/) should fix the problem: { rule = { instance = "plugin-container" }, properties = { floating = true, focus = yes } }, It keeps the focus on the flash plugin, so the full screen mode is never canceled (until you press Esc).



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