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5

Try to add a last line kill %1 In interactive shells at least you can kill the pid of the background job this way. Otherwise look if the process can write a pid file or use killall, if you're sure, there's only one process of this wm


3

There's no similar mechanism, because the reasons are completely different. A garbled text terminal comes from having multiple sources all writing to the terminal, with no coordination between them. So you end up with text where it doesn't belong, which is solved by making the application whose text you do want to see redisplay what it wants. xrefresh is ...


2

Well, thanks to @Basile's comment, I learned a lot and came up with following working sample: #!/usr/bin/python3 import Xlib import Xlib.display disp = Xlib.display.Display() root = disp.screen().root NET_WM_NAME = disp.intern_atom('_NET_WM_NAME') NET_ACTIVE_WINDOW = disp.intern_atom('_NET_ACTIVE_WINDOW') ...


2

You need xfce4-session, or else your desktop will not run properly (yes, I'm serious). Are you running xfwm4? Do you have a saved session? Is xfsettingsd running? Oh, and don't use Xfce4.8 anymore. It's horrible outdated and does things the wrong way (like thunar-vfs).


2

The role of an X11 window manager is quite complex. First, learn more about X core protocol and X architecture. Then read EWMH if you need to understand the conventional roles of WMs (also known and respected by X11 toolkits like GTK, Qt, etc...). Even single-application but multiple-windows (e.g. popups) programs practically need some WM Then you could ...


2

If you're trying to develop something like a public kiosk where users should be able to only open the available applications and only in full screen mode, then I would say that having the launcher also be the window manager is a valid strategy. On the other hand, leveraging an existing window manager that can be configured to provide the restricted user ...


2

xseticon allows you to do exactly that.


2

You can run xrandr as any user running an X session. Xrandr is a command line program, so you run it in your terminal. So you would run something like this in your user terminal $ xrandr --dpi 220


2

If you only want to change the DPI within i3, you could put the command in your i3 config file with the line: exec xrandr --dpi 220 Depending on your distro you will find the config file in different places but often under ~/.config/i3/config


2

Use Devilspie2 to set the window type to "Utility" for selective applications. This window type will not be affected by "Opacity of inactive windows" in Xfce environment. Preliminary setup Install Devilspie2 from the repository (available in Debian and Ubuntu repositories), then create a new configuration file at $HOME/.config/devilspie2 with the following ...


2

Headerbar/CSD Actually, a section of the code that I found via reddit and posted above, namely headerbar entry, headerbar spinbutton, headerbar button, headerbar separator { margin-top: 2px; /* same as headerbar side padding for nicer proportions */ margin-bottom: 2px; } DOES modify the headerbars/CSDs. However the effect is not immediate. Even ...


2

What you're asking is probably doable if you can determine the window-id's involved and use wmctrl to ask the window manager to do the moving and stacking operations on your behalf. That is, your terminal program would start the image viewer it would obtain the window-id of the image viewer using that information, it would ask the window manager to move ...


2

Just find another theme with a bigger close button here http://box-look.org/?xcontentmode=7402 If you intend to keep the current theme, you must replace those three icons by hand, enlarge it. You should find your current theme in ~/.themes/NAME/openbox/ The rc.xml is irreverent from this.


1

You can ask the X server to use only 8-bit depth. In your /etc/X11/xorg.conf file: Section "Screen" Identifier "Screen0" DefaultDepth 8 EndSection


1

chmod +x .config/bspwm/bspwmrc did the trick


1

I doubt that your display manager doesn't let you choose, but I don't like neither Gnome nor KDE, so I don't know what you'll be running, but you can try some others. Personally I like lightdm, but there's a list at https://wiki.debian.org/DisplayManager A less subtle approach would be to uninstall gnome.


1

I experienced this problem and I believe I've pinned it down to happening after installing nVidia graphics driver. The behaviour I experienced was that I could not add any workspaces and when showing multitasking view, none of my open applications displayed (hence gala not letting me make more workspaces). Reverting back to regular open source graphics ...


1

kill -TERM -$$ (kill current process group) should also do it in a race condition-safe manner. This or kill % should be preferred to killing by pid or by name.


1

from digging through the XML file in Matchbox's Git repo: The window manager has redefinable shortcut keys which can be used to perform window operations or launch applications. The location of the config file is PREFIX/share/matchbox/kbdconfig, this can be overridden by the user having a ~/.matchbox/kdbconfig file. The config file is made up of one ...


1

The qtcurve config file is ~/.config/qtcurve/stylerc. You can copy the contents of your downloaded xxxx.qtcurve file into that file. You can customise many aspetcs of your theme. To understand the functions of keys (activeTabAppearance, appearance, …) you can examine this file. Yet I couldn't find a reference for values (darkinverted, origselected, …). ...


1

If I'm not wrong you cannot do that with Xorg. It would only be possible with Wayland. You could try latest Plasma (development branch, not the released one): https://dot.kde.org/2015/12/18/first-plasma-wayland-live-image


1

Wayland promises to offer High DPI support like what you are talking about. Only issue I have with Wayland is that it is still not fully baked. I have run it on my Fedora 23 Gnome install and its great except when it doesn't work. For instance Gparted wont start because GTK cant open display 0, etc. Anyway its not too far off, and it looks like they are ...


1

IIRC neither gnome nor kde currently support dpi scaling on wayland, so the answer is currently none.


1

Thx to answer to this question: Cannot change global keyboard shortcuts in Linux Mint XFCE I found quite an easy way to propagate all made changes to other user accounts on a system. Just copy your local configuration file named xfce4-keyboard-shortcuts.xml (located here: ~/.config/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-xml/) over the same file in other accounts. ...


1

Menu should be generated from the $XDG_DATA_DIRS/applications/*.desktop files, where $XDG_DATA_DIRS usually points to at least one directory: /usr/share. Each file describes several menu entry's properties such as its name, program to be run, icon, categories, etc. This file should be generated during program installation, so probably something went wrong ...


1

Enlightenment is a Windows Manager but with additional features, however, Cinnamon does not currently have any sort of support for other Window Managers than Muffin (Cinnamons default one). The reason you had to logout to use Enlightenment is not because it's "more than a Windows Manager". It's simply because it's not Cinnamon. So what you tried to do is to ...


1

There is no official list, so you'll have to monitor each project's announced support for Wayland. For example, Gnome 3.20's release notes.


1

This sounds like a race condition: another app may be parsing the same key to toggle Wifi. This can be checked by binding your script to an unrelated key: if this other key makes your script work as expected, then you have a race condition on XF86WLAN.


1

Even you aren't still interested, somebody else might be ... The Enlightenment window manager, since their big re-write (E17) and later (E18, E19), has UI scaling options; on the computer connected to my 1080p panel, I just set the scaling to 2x & it is very comfortable from a few metres away. I vaguely recall a crash in some resolution-dependent apps ...


1

I had this exact same problem. So I wrote a shell script that I bound to a hotkey. When I hit the hotkey, it gets the window id of the currently active window (the one that has focus). Then it gives you a popup dialog where you enter the title you want that window to have. Then every time that window changes its name, it changes it back to the title you ...



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