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20

You are asking five questions here, and might be better asking five questions ☺ But I'll jump in: X is a server and can be compared to a "web server" in that it is a process that listens for incoming connections that speak a particular protocol (the X protocol) and it issues answers. The connections come from X clients, which may be on the local host or ...


19

It depends a bit what you mean by tiling: Permanently tiling or just temporary to get an overview and select a window? If you use compiz ("Desktop effects") the latter is possible by pressing Super+W (Super is normally the "Windows"-Key). For "permanent" tiling: Tile windows with compiz: Install the Compiz Settings manager (e.g. package ...


14

From the bottom up: Xorg, XFree86 and X11 are display servers. This creates the graphical environment. [gkx]dm (and others) are display managers. A login manager is a synonym. This is the first X program run by the system if the system (not the user) is starting X and allows you to log on to the local system, or network systems. A window manager controls ...


13

Did you have a look at some other "lighterweight" ;-) window managers? I'm completly happy with i3 for example: http://i3wm.org/ It's just a tiling windowmanger with dmenu for launching applications. No desktop, no other special features and the binary is just some KBs. There are a lot others in this range: evilwm - http://www.6809.org.uk/evilwm/ dwm - ...


13

How can I fix it so that launching of Nautilus does not bring GNOME background? The reason that this happens is that Nautilus is not only Gnome's file manager it's also responsible for drawing Gnome's desktop. So when you start nautilus it renders you desktop because it views that as one of it's responsibilities. To disable this behavior, invoke it ...


13

In more recent gnome versions (e.g., gnome-shell), you need to use this instead: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences resize-with-right-button true Gnome defaults to using the Super ("Windows") key for window actions, so the above alone will enable moving (super-leftdrag) and resizing (super-rightdrag). To use the Alt key instead of the Super ...


13

Here, in Xfce4 Settings Manager or launch xfce4-settings-manager from terminal, In Window Manager configuration, find the keyboard part, look for Window operations menu, and then hit on Clear button, which will remove that shortcut key, effects immedately


12

The Wikipedia page on Comparison of X Window Managers sorts the various Window Managers into four categories: Heavyweight, Middleweight, Lightweight, and minimal. You'd probably be interested in those in the minimal category. Right now, those include Matchbox, sithWM, evilwm, dwm, WMFS, wmii, and scrotwm. (i3 gets put into Lightweight; Xfwm (used by ...


12

Personally, i3 takes the best features of the other big tiling-wm's (Xmonad, Awesome, DWM, etc) and combines it into one, Combined with dmenu/conky/dzen2 it's just what I look for in a WM. Check out the page; http://i3.zekjur.net/


11

"Complicated to configure" varies greatly depending on what languages you're proficient in. XMonad was extraordinarily complicated for me to configure, but that was because I know absolutely no Haskell, and that's the language the configurations are in. The two tiling window managers I've used and quite liked are: Awesome. Awesome configurations are in ...


11

Here's a very short rough characterization: Display manager: The program that provides you a graphical login and then starts your session. Runs as root or dedicated user. Session manager: The program that actually controls your session. Runs under your account. Windowing system: The complete GUI drawing/control system. Describes not a component in itself, ...


10

There's a Arch Linux wiki entry comparing 13 different Tiling Window Managers, in grid-like fashion, here on the Arch Linux Wiki. Perhaps it would be hepful. I haven't tried any of them yet, personally, but plan to in the near future when I have some time, so I'm following this thread closely as well.


10

You can simply place code in a separate file and include it with dofile("somefile.lua") Note: The working directory is $HOME. To specify a file relative to rc.lua you can use dofile(awful.util.getdir("config") .. "/" .. "somefile.lua") If it's more than just some code and it might be used by others as well, it might make sense to create a lua module ...


9

I asked a similar question once. It is definitely a good idea if you find yourself ignoring the miscellaneous tools and features that come with the desktop environment. The solution is, you don't need to install a desktop environment (or anything you don't use), just a window manager of your choice. I (also) asked another question about lightweight window ...


9

Minimizing a window might free a little memory, but it depends on the application, and it won't amount to much. In any case, minimizing won't make more difference than any other form of hiding. Even if an application's window is minimized, it's still running. The application isn't going to need to keep less data in memory just because one of its windows is ...


9

While you ask for window management system you mention features like find/replace, file management etc. which is usually not part of Window Management, but a Desktop Environment, so you should be looking for separate tools for that. For general tools I would suggest having a look at http://suckless.org, they provide nice list of "do one thing and do it well" ...


9

Is a "Display Manager" the same thing as a "Session Manager"? Not quite, but they often overlap in implementation. A Display Manager just logs the user in and start a session, which consists of all the programs that run from the moment you log in to when you log out from the computer again. Commonly the display manager will start a Desktop Environment ...


8

I'd like to recommend two different tiling window managers, one dynamic and one manual. XMonad is very powerful yet easy to learn, there is a short guided tour that explains its basic features and key bindings. It integrates smoothly with GNOME, the documentation is comprehensive and there are lots of additional extensions available. It supports the ...


8

This is easier to do if you install something like xdotool. Then you can do: xdotool search --name "window name" windowsize 300 400 replace "window name" with a name or reg ex appearing in the window title (you can also search by window class and a variety of other things), and the two numbers appearing after windowsize are the width and height, ...


8

A window manager's task is to do window placement/layout (tiling, overlapping, resizing, ...), add decorations (min/max/close buttons, window menu, pretty title bar, ...), deal with input focus policies (focus follow mouse for instance), and that's about it. When people refer to desktop environments, they usually mean a window manager plus a set of base ...


8

X11 - a windowing protocol (network transparent by the way) and its implementation (the X server and low level libraries for accessing it). Handles "only" basic input (keyboard, mouse,...) and output (drawing rectangles), but does it in a rather abstract fashion, so that you can run a program on one machine and control it from another one, subscribe to ...


8

This is probably the urgency hint which can be set on windows. This hint is recognized by most window managers. Most terminals can be configured to set the urgency hint when receiving a bell. (u)xterm for example has the bellIsUrgent option and (u)rxvt has urgentOnBell. To ring the bell in a terminal just run tput bel or echo "\a" (depending on the shell ...


8

According to the Arch Wiki i3 page, to autostart an application on a specific workspace, you use i3-msg: exec --no-startup-id i3-msg 'workspace 1:Web; exec /usr/bin/firefox'


8

A window manager is what runs after you've logged in. A graphical login screen is called a display manager. To set up a display manager in Arch, consult the wiki. It boils down to installing a display manager with pacman, and then systemctl enable [your chosen display manager]


7

There are a few out there, but there's one that sticks out (to me) which I found suited my needs: It was not just configured in a nice language, but was also programmed in it (Python) The ability to make my own layouts (which I found awesome didn't do) Lightweight even though it's programmed in a dynamic language (just 6.6MB of ram) The name is Qtile.


7

I personally use Ratpoison when I need a light weight tiling WM - The configuration worked pretty well out of box, and since I'm quite adjusted to using GNU Screen for many years the leap to Ratpoison wasn't very difficult. I've also been using StumpWM Which has been more active in development than Ratposion.


7

If the window manager supports Xlib there is. This uses Python to set the window's size to 500x300: WIDTH, HEIGHT = 500, 300 import Xlib import Xlib.display display = Xlib.display.Display() root = display.screen().root windowID = root.get_full_property(display.intern_atom('_NET_ACTIVE_WINDOW'), Xlib.X.AnyPropertyType).value[0] window = ...


7

dwm is a minimalist window manager that just manages windows. What you are asking requires a bit of a workaround. There are two separate, but related steps. First, set up your rules for irrsi in config.h - specifying the tag in which you would like it to appear and whether it should be floating or not. Something like this will open irssi in the first tag: ...


7

If you only want to run GUI applications from a remote display, and never want to have a graphical environment inside the virtual machine, then you don't need to install anything other than the applications and whatever libraries it depends on. You don't need to install an X server, which provides the capability of running GUI applications (it provides the ...


7

A windowing system is a software component that provides windows for applications to draw in and can display these windows on the screen. The X Window System is the standard windowing system on Unix systems; outside Mac OS X, it doesn't really have competition (this may change if Wayland or Mir become viable). The X Window System has a client-server ...



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