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9

Most terminals can be launched using the geometry switch allowing you to specify terminal's size and position (COLUMNSxROWS+X+Y) e.g.: gnome-terminal --geometry 73x31+100+300 or xterm -geometry 93x31+100+350 If you want to make the above permanent, copy the terminal launcher (terminal's .desktop file) from /usr/share/applications/ to ...


7

You can do this using wmctrl. Example Get your window's ID. $ wmctrl -l 0x02a00004 0 grinchy saml@grinchy:~ 0x0620004f 0 grinchy [gnome] Bash command for Maximizing and Unmaximizing windows in gnome? - Google Chrome Then toggle window ID 0x0620004f, like so. $ wmctrl -i -r 0x0620004f -b toggle,maximized_vert,maximized_horz


6

The panel appears on the primary monitor. You have not said how you are setting your system up so I can't give you a very detailed answer. You will need to use xrandr to find out you current setup. In my case this is: $ xrandr | grep -w connected VGA-0 connected 1440x900+1600+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 408mm x 255mm DP-3 connected ...


5

You did not do anything to the Firefox process. It was already in state S before. “Interruptible sleep” effectively means idle. The process is waiting, and will wake up when it receives an input. That's the normal state of a process unless you catch it while it's busy. You have made the window disappear. Maybe you sent it to a different desktop. How to ...


5

From man awesome there doesn't seem to be a default key binding to close all windows of an application. It might be possible to manually add such a binding. There is, however, a default key binding to close the one focused window: Mod4-Shift-c. This will leave other windows (if any) of the application intact.


5

With wmctrl: wmctrl -a 'title substring' With xdotool: xdotool search 'title substring' windowactivate With xdotool, you can refine the search by window class (i.e. by application), e.g. xdotool search --all --class XTerm --name 'title substring' windowactivate


4

You can use xdotool to achieve what you want. The main project page is over on github. You could do something like this for example: xdotool behave_screen_edge bottom-left search --class gnome-terminal windowactivate This will give you a hot corner in the lower left which will activate all the windows that are a member of the class gnome-terminal. This is ...


4

Use gdevilspie to match this application and set the workspace.


4

@msw did a good job explaining your 2nd Q, and some of your 1st: B) Suggest any relatively-easy ways to regain any form of control, to (at the very least) save the tabs I had annoyingly opened in Private Browsing mode? So I'll try and address your 1st Q a bit more: A) Elaborate as to what the state is, in more detail? The state values Sl (That's ...


4

I believe the related man page is, XKillClient. You can use xdotool to simulate the close button being clicked from a terminal like so. Example Assuming I have a gnome-terminal open and it's name is "saml@grinchy:/home". Get the window ID $ xdotool search --name "saml@grinchy:/home" 96488188 Send it a Alt+F4 $ xdotool windowactivate --sync 96488188 ...


3

The simplest way is to do gnome-terminal --maximize For some more powerful options, try DevilsPie.


3

To move it to a different monitor, right click on an empty area, select "Properties" and then uncheck the 'Expand' box. Now left click on the end one of the ends and drag it to a different monitor. Right click again on the end (making sure not to hit any other widget in the panel) and click on Expand again.


3

The commands are echo -ne '\e[9;1t' to maximize and echo -ne '\e[9;0t' to restore the original size. It's described in the xterm control sequences documentation.


3

you do not need any external tools, just read man fluxbox-apps, edit .fluxbox/apps and put there something like [app] (name=xyz) [workspace] (n) [end]


3

The supplied answer from Uwe did not work for me, but this did: echo -ne "\e[10;2;t" From this page.


3

You can use xdotool with windowminimize. Assuming that it is the active window: xdotool windowminimize "$(xdotool getactivewindow)" If it isn't the active window, you can use xdotool search Spotify to get the window. If this doesn't work, you can use xprop to find the WM_CLASS of the Spotify window, and use that instead.


3

You can use a small BASH script to do that: This opens a new workspace (taken from here) and runs a command: #!/bin/bash i3-msg workspace $(($(i3-msg -t get_workspaces | tr , '\n' | grep '"num":' | cut -d : -f 2 | sort -rn | head -1) + 1)) sublime-text Create this script under /usr/bin, name it eg. sublime-new, give it exec permissions and you can now ...


3

There are several extensions on the GNOME extensions site which can give you various modes of "snapping" your windows. One that works particularly well is gTile.     References Keyboard Shortcuts GNOME 3


2

You seems to hit a bug of sawfish: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/sawfish/+bug/1083260 PS: And it is a bad idea to test sawfish with ubuntu repo, can't even login link.


2

pgrep -x chromium wouldn't match process names like chromium-foo, and > /dev/null could be replaced with -q: pgrep -xq chromium; echo $(($? == 0)) pgrep is not defined by POSIX, and for example it wasn't included with OS X until recently. But you could also use ps: ps -eo comm= | grep -xq chromium; echo $(($? == 0)) # GNU ps -eco comm= | grep -xq ...


2

xwininfo -root -children | grep -q '"Firefox")' echo "$(($? == 0))" Would output 1 if there's a window of class Firefox connected to your X server (by any user from any machine). To limit to Firefox processes local to the machine where you're running that command: xwininfo -root -children | awk '/"Firefox"\)/{print $1}' | xargs -I% xprop -id % ...


2

You could see if the window is hiding somewhere by using the wmctrl command to list the windows known to your instance of X11. Example $ wmctrl -l 0x02600007 -1 greeneggs.bubba.net Desktop 0x01a0005d 0 greeneggs.bubba.net linux - How to pop up "hidden" X application - Unix & Linux Stack Exchange - Google Chrome 0x02a00006 -1 greeneggs.bubba.net ...


1

I think you can use the trap command to do this. You can see more about it here in the docs titled: Bash Guide for Beginners - 12.2. Traps. Example Here's an example that catches Ctrl + C. #!/bin/bash # traptest.sh trap "echo Booh!" SIGINT SIGTERM echo "pid is $$" while : # This is the same as "while true". do sleep 60 # This script ...


1

It is possible for X clients to lose their connection and somehow not be notified of it. The process will often wait on the socket across which nothing will ever come, leaving it in an interruptable sleep. For Firefox only (and some other programs like gvim or chrome which make special provisions for storing state in failure) a simple: $ kill -TERM pid ...


1

If you don't want to specify the geometry/position during startup, but permanently, simple use Kwin's rule system: Launch the desired application Right-click on the title-bar or use Alt+F3 More Actions Special Window Settings Tab: Window matching Check, whether the values were detected correctly, otherwise use the Detect Windows Properties button to ...


1

Yes, the "Ring" needs the names of the programs which will be included in it. But, assuming all windows you have also yield an icon, you can navigate over the Icon Manager by programming keys (I use Shift, Alt or Ctrl and F9, F10 and F11 to move left, right or down and F12 to deiconize the Icon Manager if it gets iconized. This will work whether the window ...


1

The f.warpring function is close, but you have to define a list of windows that are part of the ring, and there doesn't seem to be a way to say "all of them". This, for example, sets up Alt+Tab and Shift+Alt+Tab to cycle among xterms: WindowRing { "XTerm" } "Tab" = m : all : f.warpring "next" "Tab" = m | s : all : f.warpring "prev" Have you tried the ...


1

This is limitation on what you can do with WMII via EWMH. This does implement only a subset of the EWMH specification. You would have to switch to a more compliant window manager for that. (You seem to be calling wmctrl the right way, BTW)


1

There are a couple of ways to check if a process having a particular name is currently running. One is to use pgrep and another is to use ps: pgrep "chromium" >/dev/null 2>&1 && echo 1 || echo 0 ps aux | grep "[c]hromium" >/dev/null 2>&1 && echo 1 || echo 0 grep "[c]hromium" <(ps aux) >/dev/null 2>&1 ...



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