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0

Debian- and Ubuntu-compatible software should be ok. Googleing "captive portal ubuntu" gave me CoovaChilli.


0

I would use device bonding, meaning you are creating a new virtual device for which you assign the network settings (e.g. IP address, mask, etc.) and then you enslave both the ethernet and wifi interfaces to that interface. Something like: $ sudo modprobe bonding $ sudo ifconfig bond0 192.168.0.1 netmask 255.255.0.0 $ sudo ifenslave bond0 eth0 wlan0 ...


0

I have accomplished something similar to what you are describing using 2 wifi interfaces and wired Ethernet concurrently. The wired Ethernet is connected to a test network. The 1st wifi adapter is configured as a AP using hostapd for initial configuration. The 2nd wifi adapter is connected to the local wifi network for access throughout the building. ...


2

You might find this thread and this one pretty useful. If your wifi network uses WEP encryption, then # turn wireless card on: ifconfig wlan0 # wlan0 is your wireless interface # connect to network iwconfig wlan0 essid <name> key <password> # Here # <name> -- your access point name # <password> -- your password # Then ...


0

if ping -q -w 1 -c 1 $(ip r | grep default | cut -d ' ' -f 3) > /dev/null; then wget "http://clients3.google.com/generate_204?" -O /dev/null 2>&1 | grep "204 No Content" > /dev/null if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]; then # Perform login fi fi Reference: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/929368/how-to-test-a-internet-connection-in-bash ...


1

The problem was the wicd daemon, which runs by default in this distribution. Apparently, wicd was waking up a few seconds after the normal ifup/down scripts had configured the interface and blindly re-configuring it to use DHCP. This was very hard to track down. The solution is to disable the wicd daemon from running at bootup with the command... ...


1

Seems like Broadcom devices have a weird history with respect to Arch Linux. I found this Arch Linux wiki article which seems to be your question exactly. The salient advice given is this: Install broadcom-wl from aur, unload the brcmsmac and load the wl module. That AUR package is here. Oddly, the Broadcom page referenced from the AUR page doesn't ...


0

This sounds like ssh isn't listening on all interfaces or is administratively blocked (iptables rule for example). Start by making sure that sshd is listening on all interfaces. Go to the server you are trying to connect to and run: sudo lsof -n -i -P | grep sshd This is ls for open files. The flags are -n => don't bother looking up ip names (this makes ...


1

The DKMS package 8188EUS used old drivers. Ended up compilig this branch: https://github.com/lwfinger/rtl8188eu/tree/v4.1.8_9499 And worked.


0

Check the answer about depmod -a and modprobe here: https://ask.fedoraproject.org/en/question/69411/no-wifi-after-kernel-upgrade/ After those operations, run lsmod | grep wl to verify the driver has been loaded.


0

Edit /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf and add your encryption type and password. use this link as a pointer.


1

Try this command: sudo apt-get install firmware-b43-lpphy-installer Also, if that won't work, look here: http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/1428 It seems someone made it work... in Mint, but still... If you couldn't find the package: https://packages.debian.org/wheezy/firmware-b43-lpphy-installer ...you need b43-lpphy driver aka low-power


1

I agree, you can use this link as a pointer


3

May be your wireless card is in turned off state, does the laptop have any dedicated physical switch or key combo(like Fn+F3 on my acer laptop) to turn on/off Wi-Fi ? most laptops also have a LED to show Wi-Fi card state. Device firmwares are not pre installed in kali-linux(my last used version 1.0.4 can't tell about latest versions) , so if not already ...


0

Obviously, it will be difficult to download software if your network is not working. Debian also creates non-free installation images. One of these would probably have been better to use for your hardware. If your Ethernet is currently working with a different free driver, then you can get the rest of the firmware that you may need for your hardware as ...


-1

sudo apt-get install linux-firmware-nonfree or you can use apt-cache search realtek to see if there are specific drivers for your hardware.


1

Isnt your OpenWRT modem connected to your internet router with a cable? As far as I know is when you bring your interface in AP mode you cant use it to access the internet on the same time.


2

The following question in AskUbuntu resembles to this question and the best chosen answer suggests to perform the following steps: Go to: System->Administrator->Additional Drivers(Hardware drivers) Then click to Broadcom STA wireless driver and enable it. Restart Although, this is for Ubuntu, the best way to: Open System Settings --> ...


0

You want to set up so-called Internet Connection Sharing (ICS). In general you'll need to assign a static address to the ethernet port on your laptop, then configure dnsmasq (DHCP/DNS server) and iptables (firewall) on it. Fortunately Ubuntu has decent support for ICS with GUI (/usr/bin/nm-connection-editor), see this question at Ask Ubuntu which also just ...


1

Solution: auto lo iface lo inet loopback allow-hotplug eth0 iface eth0 inet dhcp allow-hotplug wlan0 iface wlan0 inet dhcp wpa-ssid "myssid" wpa-psk "mypasswd" The differences between auto and allow-hotplug are explained well in Good detailed explanation of /etc/network/interfaces syntax: auto interface – Start the interface(s) at boot. That’s ...


0

Fixed. I don't know which step is really need, but it's what i have done, in order: Remove wi-fi connections from network manager that has that ssid (i was tried create another one) remove the files of that connections from /etc/NetworkManager/connections/[NAME OF CONNECTION] reboot login with the original admin user (i was trying with another admin user ...


0

Every connection has a configuration file stored in /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections directory. Sometimes those files get corrupt and you cannot reconnect to the same network even though seemingly the file has all the info - password,essid,etc. So removing the specific file and reconnecting again, should help your case. For instance, sudo rm ...


0

You will have to monitor the bandwidth to see if something else is using your wireless connection. For example you could run something like: $ speedometer -r wlan0 -t wlan0 This way you can see if the bandwidth is what it should be. Moreover, pinging concurrently from other consoles your local gateway and let's say www.google.com would also be a nice ...


0

May be a firmware issue, Debian does not come with device firmwares pre installed, most wireless cards needs proper firmware to work. what is your ethernet and wi-fi hardware ? try again after installing these packages and a reboot sudo apt-get install firmware-linux firmware-linux-free firmware-linux-nonfree firmware-atheros firmware-brcm80211


2

I hate to tell you this, but this card is not supported, by the default driver. Under normal circumstances, all Broadcom cards are supported by the b43/b43legacy drivers on the Linux Wireless Project, but as you can see on the Supported Hardware list, the entry for 14e4:43b1 shows: +================================================+ | ID Support Name ...


0

Debian should not be any different than any other distro, other than kernel version. As always, device drivers depend on the kernel. The correct driver for the DWA130F1 with a USB ID of 2001:3c25 is rt2800usb. A patch adding this device to the USB tables of that driver was submitted to the kernel as commit ea345c145ff23197eab34d0c4d0c8a93d7bea8c6 by Scott ...


0

ran yum install NetworkManager-wifi and rebooted and my wifi card showed up. was able to connect - posting this answer from that connection :)



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