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You don't say what version of Red Hat you're using, you can check like this: $ cat /etc/redhat-release Fedora release 19 (Schrödinger’s Cat) You likely have some old version of Fedora on it. Perhaps Fedora Core 5 or 6 with that version of GNOME. In those ancient versions I believe they came with a version of NetworkManager. There's typically a GUI for ...


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You're looking for bonding. This driver is intended for (surprise!) bonding individual links to one logical link. Several modes are supported, one of them is fail-over mode (you have one primary link, in your case wired ethernet, and several fail-over links, which take over when the primary link fails). What you'll need is CONFIG_BONDING enabled in the ...


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While iwconfig prints the RTS threshold anyway, iw prints it only when the RTS mechanism is enabled. In order to read the value the command is iw phy phy0 info | grep RTS which outputs no lines if RTS is off or something like RTS threshold: <number> if it's enabled.


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There is no default, because it always depends the hardware capabilities and the configuration. They are always negotiated at handshake stage. To see your WiFi capabilites use iw phy See also HT20/40. Some tcpdump wireless filters.


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This took a while to route out but I think what you're asking is as follows. In the output of iwconfig: $ sudo iwconfig wlp3s0 IEEE 802.11bgn ESSID:"none_of_your_business_1" Mode:Managed Frequency:2.437 GHz Access Point: 00:22:3F:03:5C:67 Bit Rate=54 Mb/s Tx-Power=14 dBm Retry long limit:7 RTS thr:off ...


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I assume you are using wpa_supplicant to connect to wireless networks. I believe you should always whitelist and never blacklist, i.e. that you should use explicit configuration for unauthenticated networks as well as for authenticated ones. Otherwise you never know where you are connecting and you will often end up with defunct conectivity. There are tools ...


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You can't. Easiest solution for you would be for your AP to ban the MAC address of your client. That, or just stop trying to connect to every open BSS network out there.


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Why are you running wifi-menu each time you start? Unless you are constantly connecting to new wireless networks, you should simply use wifi-menu once to create a profile, then use netctl to automatically connect when you boot.


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Alternately leave the password entry blank. If you're running wpa_gui, it will prompt you for the password. (I do this with eduroam accounts, as my password is the same as my *nix login)



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