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On Linux, you can find out which driver a network interface is using with this command: ls -l /sys/class/net/<interface name>/device/driver You can rmmod that unless it is statically linked into the running kernel (not likely for a distribution kernel and a wireless driver). Watch out for any other interfaces using the same driver which will be ...


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It just occurred to me that I could look at the source. In wavemon.c there are some color palette initialization lines: init_pair(CP_SCAN_CRYPT, COLOR_RED, COLOR_BLACK); init_pair(CP_SCAN_UNENC, COLOR_GREEN, COLOR_BLACK); init_pair(CP_SCAN_NON_AP, COLOR_YELLOW, COLOR_BLACK); I take this to mean that: Red is encrypted. Green is unencrypted. Yellow, ...


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Assuming that i) your wireless interface is called wlan0 and ii) you have already connected to these networks at least once, so that their credentials are saved and iii) that you're using NetworkManager (you probably are); you could use nmcl, NetworkManager's commandline interface. Create a text file with the list of network names you want to try: network1 ...


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Those two errors of rfkill are by Rfkill, a tool for enabling and disabling wireless devices. Most of the time the kernel does not have rfkill enabled in it. And so there is no /dev/rfkill file present, and rfkill command will give errors like rfkill: Cannot open RFKILL control device Control device here means /dev/rfkill


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On Debian, all methods to start and stop network connections run scripts under /etc/network. This is documented in the interfaces(5) man page. It is part of the ifupdown package, but the scripts are executed even if the interface is brought up or down by frameworks such as NetworkManager rather than by the ifup and ifdown commands. So put your script in ...


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Why dont you just make your pi dual-homed and setup a dhcp server. Basically just make it an access point so anyone within range can connect, they will then be assigned an ip address and then connect to the video files over Samba, NFS or something along those lines? Here is a pretty detailed tutorial on how to setup the pi as an access point. Here is a ...


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The functionality you are looking for is through nectl-auto. netctl is for auto connecting on boot or whenever the service through systemd is started where netctl-auto connects to the profiles enabled in its own manager and you would only have netctl-auto@[interface].service enabled. netctl netctl-auto


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You can check "All users may connect to this network" in General Settings. This will automatically connect on boot.


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I think you need to be more precise about your problem, especially the definition of a device name. Unfortunately I don't have access to a Raspberry Pi at the moment, so everything displayed here comes from my Debian 7 box. nmap -sP does reverse DNS lookups, so if your devices have reverse DNS entries, its output looks like this: > nmap -sP ...


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In order to get the device name of Windows hosts, use nmap --script smb-os-discovery -p 445 192.168.1.0/24 (source: http://www.blackbytes.info/2013/07/finding-windows-host/)


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I had experienced the same problems some days ago. There was this commit http://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/iwlwifi/linux-firmware.git/ updating intel 7260 firmware.



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