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9

iwconfig (and its wireless extension API) is deprecated (it's in "maintenance only mode" and "no new features will be added"). Use iw instead. This requires a moderately recent kernel (e.g. >= 3.0) with support for nl80211. using iw dev wlan0 scan, you can figure out the protocol used: If there are Supported rates below 11mbps (except 6), there is ...


8

Maybe setup smokeping on the Linux side, and point it at your AP? Smokeping will periodically (configurable) send -20 pings at the same time, and then graph how how many returned and the range of times that they returned in. If you have a lot of dropped packets, or the really wide range, then you should be concerned. If you want to run smokeping you ...


8

You can use ap-hotspot from the webupd8 repository to create an infrastracture AP instead of adhoc. I am using this on Ubuntu Precise (12.04), but it is available for Saucy, Raring and Quantal as well. $ sudo su - # add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8 # aptitude update # aptitude install ap-hotspot # ap-hotspot configure # ap-hotspot start


6

It's pretty easy. You need to connect PC to notebook. Configure eth0 on PC (set for example ip = 192.168.2.3 and default gateway 192.168.2.2 and dns server to 8.8.8.8). That's all you need to do on PC. On notebook you need to set up the internet connection as usual and configure eth0 with the following way: set ip address to 192.168.2.2, enable net ...


6

You can also install the tool fing and do a network discovery using this tool. It available as a RPM/DEB, that you can just install standalone. The makers of this tool also make FingBox, which is a mobile application for doing the same thing. Example $ sudo fing 20:59:54 > Discovery profile: Default discovery profile 20:59:54 > Discovery class: ...


5

If you are using NetworkManager (which, I believe Xubuntu does), it should be in /etc/NetworkManager/nm-system-settings.conf. There is more information about it here: http://live.gnome.org/NetworkManager/SystemSettings.


4

$ readlink /sys/class/net/wlan0/device/driver ../../../../bus/pci/drivers/ath5k In other words, the /sys hierarchy for the device (/sys/class/net/$interface/device) contains a symbolic link to the /sys hierarchy for the driver. There you'll also find a symbolic link to the /sys hierarchy for the module, if applicable. This applies to most devices, not just ...


4

Maybe there's a better way, but I've used lshw -class network (as root) and it gives me this output: *-network description: Ethernet interface product: 82566MM Gigabit Network Connection vendor: Intel Corporation physical id: 19 bus info: pci@0000:00:19.0 logical name: eth0 version: 03 ...


4

You don't want to intercept this in the air. It's very hard to do well. I suggest you change your network around a bit. You'll need a PC with two network interfaces and two routers to pull this off. Here's how I would do it: Internet --> Router --> Ubuntu machine --(network port)--> Wifi router --> iPod Ubuntu needs to "share" the Internet ...


4

You can use iwlist <interface> scan For example: iwlist wlan0 scan Also, using pipes and egrep, and practicing a little with iwlist scan, you can extract the info you want: iwlist wlan0 scan | egrep 'Address:|ESSID:'


4

You can check what the access point is broadcasting in its beacons by doing this (you'll need the wireless-tools package): $ sudo iwlist wlan0 scanning The output varies by device, and will display every SSID the interface can see. My WPA2 access point gives this (from iwlist's very verbose output): IE: IEEE 802.11i/WPA2 Version 1 Group Cipher : ...


4

One method for configuring multiple NIC cards is through the use of what's called bonding. It goes by other names as well: Bonding Channel Bonding Link Aggregation Using NetworkManager What version of NetworkManager are you using? Version 0.9.8 is the first that purports to offer support for network bonding. excerpt from phoronix.com Add a ...


3

As always, the problem was with no finishing the reading of documentation. I needed to actually run NetworkManager (gnome automatically picks it up), and disable archlinux's network daemon. It's all here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/NetworkManager#Configuration NOTE: You can start daemon manually by running: sudo /etc/rc.d/networkmanager


3

Normally when reporting the bugs the bug reporting system tells you what files to include, but if they don't then: /var/log/dmesg /var/log/daemon.log /var/log/messages lspci -vvv Possibly /var/log/syslog But you can simply install: Debian BTS and just follow the instructions. :)


3

From Kernel 3.0 the staging driver rt2860sta is replaced by mainline driver rt2800pci, and the staging drivers are deleted. My 901 happily uses the rt2800pci driver. Make sure that no other drivers are enabled and conflicting with it.


3

I finally found what was causing the issue. This was due to my router blocking TCP keepalive messages when I connected wirelessly (go figure). ssh my_server -o TCPKeepAlive=no solved all my problems. Yay! From the documentation: TCPKeepAlive Specifies whether the system should send TCP keepalive messages to the other side. If they are sent, death of ...


3

If you are on Linux then you can usually just do ifconfig or iwconfig to get info on your NIC. To scan you usually do iwlist wlan0 scan to get info on the wireless access points in range. In this case your wireless interface has already been identified using ifconfig (or iwconfig) as wlan0.


3

It must be just the KDE front-end because the basic NetworkManager meets both of the requirements above for me and has for all versions over the last several years. Is it possible for you to either use the NetworkManager provided interface instead of the KDE wrapper or that you are using the wrapper wrong and have it mis-configured so that it doesn't work? ...


3

Looks like maybe you're not setting the channel and "mode". I use a simple script that does these shell commands: ifconfig wlan0 down iwconfig wlan0 mode managed ifconfig wlan0 up iwconfig wlan0 channel 3 iwconfig wlan0 key xxxxxxxxxx iwconfig wlan0 key restricted iwconfig wlan0 essid "Blah Blah Foo Bar" iwconfig wlan0 ap xx:yy:zz:aa:bb:cc sleep 5 dhcpcd ...


3

VMware will translate your wireless cards on the host to wired cards that are available to the guests. The only type of network card that you will be able to add to the guest is a hardwired card. What you most likely want to do it setup the Fedora guest to use "Bridged" networking mode, and then config fedora to use DHCP. Assuming (bad I know), that you ...


3

The thing to remember is that getting used to something new, like a new operating system, is stressful. Unfortunately, I haven't got freeBSD in front of me at the moment, but assuming that there is a driver for your ethernet card (which there is in all likelihood), the first thing you should try at a command prompt is, ifconfig -a This will show you what ...


3

Simple answer: you really can't. There will always be cases when the wireless subsystem may fail (for example because of misconfiguration f the network). You can minimize the chance by thoroughly researching what hardware seems to have the best support (IMHO those with drivers open sourced or even maintained by the manufacturer have a bit of advantage). ...


3

This creates a wlan1 virtual interface using the same physical device as an existing wlan0 interface : iw dev wlan0 interface add wlan1 type station Alternatively, you can specify the physical device (linux tends to call them "wiphy") by hand: iw phy phy0 interface add wlan1 type station Then run hostapd as usual on wlan1. hostapd will handle changing ...


3

Unfortunately I have to answer the question myself now. "Unfortunately" because the answer is "No, it is not possible". I took a look at how PAP is working, and came to the conclusion that it is logically impossible to store the password as a hash value. With PAP, the username and password are sent directly to the authentification side. Therefore, the ...


3

The capability to define a new connection on the command line with nmcli dev wifi con … was added in NetworkManager 0.9.6. (If you're using Ubuntu, that means release 12.10 or higher.) In earlier versions, new connections can only be defined through the GUI or by editing configuration files manually (in /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections or under ...


3

What you describe is called a captive portal. They are typically used for authentication on Wi-Fi hotspots, but can be used to control wired network access as well. There are several ways to implement a captive portal: HTTP Redirection In this case, DNS queries from unauthenticated clients are resolved as normal. However, when the browser makes a HTTP ...


3

I believe you can do this through the Kernel module directly. Most of the Kernel modules can take parameters that you can either pass in when the driver's loaded or they can be loaded via a configuration file during boot up. Example (2.6 Kernels) I have a Fedora 14 system with the following wireless drivers. $ lsmod |grep iw iwlagn 209751 ...


3

In Debian's /etc/network/interfaces (or any other distribution using Debian's ifupdown utility), a backslash-newline sequence is removed, and backslash is not special anywhere else. A double quote character is not special either. The character # starts a comment if it's the first non-whitespace character on a (non-continuation) line. Null bytes are treated ...


3

You should be able to add a hidden network like so using NetworkManager. Step #1 - open NetworkManager's main menu                                   ...


2

I'm a little confused by what you are trying to do. You don't make it clear whether you are trying to extend an existing wireless network to include devices on your ethernet device or whether you are trying to create a new subnet and use NAT to hide this from the wireless router. The good news is that both are possible and are fairly simple. Personally if ...



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