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This can be done by using ErrorDocument directive in Apache (since you are using apache) Create an HTML page anywhere in your document root </html> <head> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="5; ,URL=http://foo.com"> </head> <body> Page not found ...Redirecting to home page in 5 seconds...</body> ...


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You'll probably want to write a rule for udev. Assuming no changes to udev.conf, your rules file should be placed into /etc/udev/rules.d/; it may help you to crib from packages' rules which may be found in /lib/udev/rules.d/. Writing good rules is a bit of an acquired art, but you could start with something simple if you have no other ttyACM* devices: # ...


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When you access the directory via a server/browser combination of any kind, your credentials are not shared, so the server does not know that the person accessing the files is you. Try chmod a+x directory_B and chmod a+r directory_B/*


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If you're new to programming, 90% that you're using Windows ! I'll show you details: With Linux: browsing the web: if you usually play flash game or flash video, you should install and use Google Chrome (not Chromium), which Adobe Flash was built-in! It's not too easy and natural to get flash cover on other browser, and they're no longer releasing new ...


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Yes, you understand correctly. You can run multiple operating systems on one PC. If you install any modern Linux distro on your computer, keeping the Windows partitions, you'll be able to select the OS on each boot. If you want to keep it short and simple, use one of the 'easier to use' distros like Linux Mint or Ubuntu. At least those two have an ...


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Currently I can think of three ways: The first is to use knockd - my favorite - (http://www.zeroflux.org/projects/knock/) and configure a port sequence only you remember and let knockd open SSH for the IP address you are referring from. knockd is available in a debian package and a sample configuration (/etc/knockd.conf) can be: [options] logfile = ...


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Simplest answer: use dynamic DNS There are some free (for private use) options around like noip.com, or dyndns.org EDIT: You have to create a script (for example) that updates the iptables rules constantly, I forgot to mention that earlier. (Thanks to @Lambert) EDIT2: I don't use a beautiful solution like that, but you could try out this neat python ...


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The right way to modify the home directory for a user is to use usermod. Using usermod -d /var/www.html username (as privileged user, i.e. root or using sudo) the home directory will be changed to the desired location.


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Read carefully passwd(5) then edit (very carefully, as root) the /etc/passwd file. You may want to change the home directory of your user, i.e. change the 6th field of the line describing your user. Alternatively, read much more about ssh and its configuration thru $HOME/.ssh/config and other files etc etc.. Very probably Putty is also configurable. I am ...



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