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echo -ne "HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized\nWWW-Authenticate: Basic realm="Restricted"\r\n\r\n`date`" | nc -l -p 8080 Output: GET / HTTP/1.1 Host: 127.0.0.1:8080 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Fedora; Linux x86_64; rv:46.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/46.0 Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,/;q=0.8 Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.5 ...


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"Authorization required" popup is generated when the server returns HTTP code 401 and the browser doesn't have the credentials yet. There are two modes of authorization: basic and digest. In basic mode, the password is transfered in the clear and is readable by everyone; in digest mode, only the hashes of credentials are transferred, so there's much less ...


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This is an opinion based question, but truth be told, to talk about performance is such a broad topic that unless you know exactly what you want and exactly what you are experiencing it is hard to advise on something. Having said that: Check this page The author is experienced on performance and was a kernel engineer for Sun. The method he describes is ...


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This is mainly an opinion answer which depends on my past experiences and nothing else. I am not a programmer and Solaris (any version) is my least favorite UNIX flavor. I try to get away with doing as little as possible on Solaris system. Having said that, I worked with T4 systems in the recent past and the CPU is a work horse. It takes a lot more than ...


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According to error messages, I think the issue comes from ExecStop=/bin/kill -15 $MAINPID where variable is not replaced. According to service documentation $MAINPID is expected only for ExecReload command. The question remains: why ExecStop is ran when you trigger start ? It is possible systemd leaves JVM process working directory as / which may not be ...


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I don't think you can can run two application in same port as DO is not providing additional IP's for Droplet. I would say try running the application using Nginx Proxy or Apache Proxy


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In the end what I had to do was to use PuTTY as the server seems to be configured in such a way as to only allow access through PuTTY. At least, this is my current workaround, though I would rather have access from my openSUSE partition command-line.


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Traditionally, the location for this would be /usr/local (resp. /usr/local/bin if this is just one executable). See What is /usr/local/bin? and What is the difference between /opt and /usr/local? .


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The only valid WHOIS registrations are for licensed domains only. However, if you own the primary domain, you could setup your own WHOIS server that could be queried for subdomains that you register under you. Code: whois -h whois.yourdomain.com subdomain.yourdomain.com It is not difficult to setup a whois server if you want to maintain one yourself.


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It is because it is a subdomain. You have to lookup the root part of the domain name: $ whois warwick.ac.uk


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The simple way create a script (for example /home/user/start_service.sh) with the follow content: #!/bin/sh while true; do path/to/service/executable done And add it to /etc/rc.local: #!/bin/sh -e su user -c '/home/user/start_service.sh' & exit 0 Then start script manually: /home/user/start_service.sh So you can forget about your web ...


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On old-style init systems you can use good old start-stop-daemon application, which takes care of restarting the process if it dies. Just do something like: start-stop-daemon --start --background --exec /path/to/your/executable It also allows to set scheduling priority, IO priority etc. for the process you are running. On a systemd enabled system you can ...


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Yes, you need to make the full-fledged web server executable a service. Prefer a non-root account for the service — I'd even say it's mandatory — to limit damages in cases the web server gets compromised. I think1 systemd is well documented enough to guide you through the required steps. 1 I don't run systemd, in case the question arises...


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In a shared web-hosting environment, there are a couple issues that you need to address right off the bat. Regarding directory permissions and only being able to access your files: what you want to do is set home directory permissions such that the "others" group has no permission whatsoever. Remember that eXecute permission is needed to cd into ...


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If you don't have r permission for a directory, but only x permission, you cannot "scan" the directory, but you can access any file in it that you know the name of. If you do ls -ld /bin you might see the mode setting to be drwxr-x--x to see that the "other" of /bin is able to use programs in it, such as /bin/ls, but not access (view) the directory in a ...


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At step 1, try also doing this: systemctl disable firewalld.service systemctl stop stops the service immediately, but leaves it configured to start again whenever it would usually do so (i.e. on boot). systemctl disable removes it from the boot process. To stop it immediately and prevent it starting on next boot, run both. systemctl status ...


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I had the same problem, fixed it by: giving tomcat user ownership of the whole tomcat directory: cd /opt && sudo chown -R tomcat tomcat/ and commenting out below line in /etc/systemd/system/tomcat.service: Environment='CATALINA_OPTS=-Xms512M -Xmx1024M -server -XX:+UseParallelGC' Hope it helps.



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