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Unless Digital Ocean has a backup method of authenticating you, then yes, it would be inaccessible forever. I don't know if they have, but even if they do, I imagine it would be a hassle. You can back up the private key to a USB memory stick, which you then keep on your person or in a bank vault or whatever you're more comfortable with. You'd want it to ...


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Well yes, you should back up your private key (and your password manager database if that's where you store the password to unlock it). But if you get locked out of a cloud computer, whether because you lost your private key or made a mistake in a configuration file or deleted an important file, you would contact your cloud provider's Support team (who has ...


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The critical file in this case is your private key. It's usually in ~/.ssh/id_rsa or ~/.ssh/id_dsa - if you have the private key that matches the public key that you've authorized on your Digital Ocean server, you'll be able to access it. If your computer crashes, restore that file to another machine. If you restore it to ~/.ssh/old_privkey on the new ...


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I was able to get this working just now with the following location in my config: location /transmission { proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:9091; proxy_pass_header X-Transmission-Session-Id; proxy_set_header Host $host; proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr; proxy_set_header ...


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Yes, it is possible, but it is also very bad practice. You would be running only a single name server instance (e.g. BIND server); you would simply define the glue records for both nameservers to resolve to the same IP.


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I'd prefer to comment, but I can't. This is a difficult question to answer because you haven't provided much detail about what your goal is. What is your end goal? What kind of code have you written? EDIT: Now we're getting somewhere. For DNS, you'll want to talk to the IT department or lab manager, as that's going to be managed by someone else, and you ...



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