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11

Aside from bandwidth and latency issues (which can vary a bit), the big differences are the functionality it provides. VNC exports a whole session, desktop and all, while ssh will run a single program and show its windows on your workstation. The VNC server exports a session that survives even when you disconnect your screen, and you can reconnect to it ...


10

One simple way is to turn on vnc screen sharing by going to System Preferences -> Sharing -> Screen Sharing on the machine you want to share. For client compatibility reasons you may need to select both "Anyone may request permission to control this screen" and the "VNC viewers may control this screen with a password" checkboxes. Once you've set up the ...


8

This is actually a known and currently open bug. However, there is a very easy workaround; just issue the following command: gsettings set org.gnome.Vino require-encryption false You will now be able to connect with most vnc viewers.


7

Port 5901, generally by convention Port 5900 + XDisplaynumber, is the TCP Port on which the VNC service listens. That's their relation. Actually you may use arbitrary TCP Ports with arbitrary Xdisplaynumbers. The VNC service is meant to transports input (mouse, keyboard) from the client to the server and output (an image) from the server to the client. This ...


7

On Linux, ss sport = :5900 Would tell you the currently established TCP connections on port 5900. For anything else, we'd need to know what VNC server you're using as there exist dozens. If you know the name of the VNC server command, lsof -ai tcp -c that-command (as the user running the VNC server or as root) would also tell you the currently ...


6

Definitely review security with a good Linux Security Checklist as the first order of business. SANS publishes a nice one. Second step is to get rid of packages that you won't use. Third step is df -h and record how much disk space the install uses. And then fourth step is to tar up the entire disk using the --exclude option to exclude the output tarball. ...


6

I use vncserver -localhost [other options here] when I start the vncserver on my debian boxes. This means VNC only accepts connections from the loopback of the remote machine.


6

As noted by yasouser, middle-click is the standard way to paste the selection buffer in linux. This buffer gets written every time anything is selected with no need to initiate a copy command. In gtk based or influenced apps, there is usually a keybinding for this as well. Shift+Insert In most Desktop Environments there is also a copy buffer that is ...


5

To paste text copied from other windows (like you said firefox) in xterm window click the mouse wheel or center mouse button.


5

Your solution would work, but I think it's a little bit rougher than it needs to be. In particular, the vnc over ssh on android is going to be troublesome. It's possible, but it's not as usable or stable as it could be. I would suggest using RDP instead. There are great RDP clients on Android, the bandwidth consumption is a lot lower so it's more usable and ...


5

systemd has something called 'targets' which can be thought of as the runlevels of init. prefdm.service will be run with the "default.target" which is set by default to "graphical.target". So, by setting the default target to "multi-user.target" (aka. SystemV runlevel 3) you will start all but the X11-server. Your vncserver@:[0-9].service will be unaffected ...


5

If I understand you right: you want to share gnome or other environment remotely as it is, then the easiest way to achieve this is to use x11vnc. It shares real X11 server as it is after user logged in: x11vnc -display :0 Or if you want vnc server run after login, you can automate with this script: #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/x11vnc -nap -wait 50 -noxdamage ...


5

You should be able to use xrandr to turn off a given display. $ xrandr --output CRT1 --off To re-enable it: $ xrandr --output CRT1 --auto You can see the names of your output displays using xrandr -q: $ xrandr -q Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1440 x 900, maximum 8192 x 8192 LVDS1 connected primary 1440x900+0+0 (normal left inverted right x ...


4

Finder doesn't use X APIs, so can't be forwarded over over ssh like that. Same with most mac applications; apple have their own windowing system called Aqua. Sharing the desktop via VNC or apple remote desktop works fine though -- look in the "Sharing" preference pane for the "Screen Sharing" option to set it up on the mac, then use a vnc client on the other ...


4

Have you tried creating ~/.vncstartup or ~/.vnc/xstartup In my version of vncserver, that's where you put your startup commands, e.g. xterm -geometry 80x25+0+0 & xterm ... ... See also Taking your desktop virtual with VNC.


4

iTALC lets you monitor and control several computers in a classroom environment. It might do what you need. I'm not sure about showing a student's screen on all others, though. There is also LanSchool, Nettop, and NetSupport Assist, all of which are commercial solutions. If none of those are what you're looking for, you might want to take a look at ...


4

The proper solution: get a VNC client that can send those keys. Like jsbillings says, some clients give you the option of sending keys to the remote via a menu. With the standard xvnc4viewer, you can use the -MenuKey option to set the key that activates the menu. Again, as per jsbillings' answer, the default key is F8. The hack: if you have a shell running ...


4

The problem is that the vnc server is listening (per default) on localhost and not on your external IP address. It is important to understand that a service can listen on a specific IP address and is only reachable via this address. In your case the VNC service is only listening on 127.0.0.1 and can only be reached via localhost. As VNC is not encrypted it ...


4

vncserver doesn't connect to the actual desktop; it creates a virtual desktop that is configured separately. If you want to access the actual desktop then you need to use either the VNC X extension or Vino.


4

Looks like you need to install X. Your VNC server log says file not found for xsetroot, xterm, and twm. See here: http://wiki.centos.org/FAQ/General#head-f9b66646092bdc0de1d8b4c82b427f796adfe2f8


3

The "1:user" tells the vnc server that the username user is map to display 1, so the port number to access this user via vnc is 5901. Note: "By default, VNC uses ports numbered 5900 plus the display number. In this example, the display is 1, so the port number is 5901.


3

The problem is solved now. I had made the silly assumption that the key bindings were global when in fact, they are per-user. I had changed the key bindings logged in as root, but was logging into a VNC session created by another user. The 'hide all normal windows…' shortcut was set to Mod4+D for this user. The standard solution—changing it to ...


3

ssh -X redirects X11 commands to your local X server. So it is as if you were running the program locally, when it's really running on the computer at the other end. It's very slow because it uses a great deal of bandwidth. (This is what people are talking about when they say X11 is "network transparent.") VNC and other remote desktop apps instead let the ...


3

This probably does belong on SuperUser, but, here's a solution. I use the vnc viewer from TightVNC (so, this might not work on all vnc viewers). On the tool bar at the top of the vnc viewer window there is an ALT modifier button. Click that (it should remain pressed). Then, just press tab. Once you've got the window you want, click the alt button again to ...


3

Yes, I just went thru this again on CentOS 5.2 (setting up old dev environment). Add this to $HOME/.vnc/xstartup worked for KDE and GNOME and ICEWM to enable copy/paste between VNC Client on Windows and the Windows host: vncconfig -nowin & export XKL_XMODMAP_DISABLE=1 autocutsel -fork


3

Yes. Just set DISPLAY to the same value as in the VNC session. (Start a terminal window in the VNC session and type echo $DISPLAY. That's the value you need to use.)


3

You should start the shells in screen or tmux so they can be easily reattached in a new terminal. With screen this is done with the following steps: Start the shell somewhere (e.g. in VNC): screen -S myshell Reattach the shell somewhere else (e.g. a new terminal with SSH): screen -x myshell While the methods above are highly recommended, they are not ...


3

Inherently, none. When you run the xvncserver it needs to do two things. Open a listening port (which for VNC is 5901 Create a display target The display target can be any number. Commonly, logging in on the console via X will use display :0. It doesn't have to, you could log in on the console first and then use startx :36 instead. VNC uses 1.0 by ...


3

There is an easier way to do this if you are going to go headless only: Don't use a standard X server. I do this fairly often on boxes that almost never have monitors attached. This example uses xdm on debian, but I have done it with kdm and gdm. specify Xvnc as the X server to use with its full path and specify the resolution on the command line. for ...


3

Create a custom LiveCD/LiveDVD with the software you require, for e.g. Fedora the instructions are here. You can also put it on an USB stick. I'm sure users knowledgeable in other distributions will chime in and add links to instructions tailored to their favorite.



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