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9

You're not going to be able to use GParted because the filesystem is on LVM and GParted does not support that. First, TAKE A BACKUP OF THE VM. Then perform the following as "root" from a command line. It looks like you've already rebooted but just in case, ensure the kernel recognizes the larger disk echo 1 > /sys/class/scsi_disk/0:0:0:0/device/rescan ...


4

The right way to do this would be to find the config file that is changed, and edit it to the correct resolution. But I'm not an XFCE user so you'll have to look for this yourself :) Another, desktop-agnostic way is to change the resolution using xrandr. Assuming you can still boot up your computer and use Ctrl+Alt+F1 to access a command prompt, you can ...


4

I did not download it and not sure if this is everything but you should be able to get started with it. The most important part is that you are able to use the provided disk image. VirtualBox supports vmdk (Vmwares image format) out of the box. So you should be able to directly use the provided disk image with VirtualBox. If this does not work have a look ...


4

You often cannot run virtualization products inside other virtualization products. In this case you're attempting to run KVM (one virtualization product) inside another one (VMware), and this might be technically feasible, the performance of having to run a nested hypervisor inside another hypervisor on your Dell Inspiron laptop will likely be completely ...


3

VMware will translate your wireless cards on the host to wired cards that are available to the guests. The only type of network card that you will be able to add to the guest is a hardwired card. What you most likely want to do it setup the Fedora guest to use "Bridged" networking mode, and then config fedora to use DHCP. Assuming (bad I know), that you ...


3

In addition to the grub password, you also need to configure the BIOS to not allow booting from media other than the device that contains your primary OS. You will want to set a BIOS password so this configuration can not be changed. Unless your drives are encrypted, physical access to the machine is access to your data. Even with a BIOS password the CMOS ...


3

Disk alignment used to be rather trivial to figure out. All the tracks had the same number of sectors of the same size. Modern high density drives use variable numbers of sectors per track maintaining roughly the same bit density on the platter. They still report the old sizing information of cylinders, tracks, and sectors. Actual sector geometry varies ...


3

You could try Joanna Rutkowska's Red Pill This little program examines the IDTR (interrupt descriptor table register) using the SIDT instruction (x86 only), which apparently will be set differently by different VMMs.


3

If all you need is a way to tell whether the OS/host is a virtualized host or not, just you have a perl module Sys::Detect::Virtualization and the script with it virtdetect. It does all the possible heuristics/guess detections and reports the detected OS environment. Give it a try. http://search.cpan.org/dist/Sys-Detect-Virtualization/script/virtdetect


3

The easiest way is probably just not to have a default route. If you've set up a static IP address, edit /etc/network/interfaces and comment out the "gateway" line. If you're using DHCP, you may be able to not ask for a gateway (edit /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf and change the "request" to not ask for "routers", but I haven't tested this. Alternatively, you ...


3

I have some experience in usage of python library for configuring vmware, pysphere. Possible tasks, (taken from official web site) Connect to VMWare's ESX, ESXi, Virtual Center, Virtual Server hosts Query hosts, datacenters, resource pools, virtual machines VM: Power on, power off, reset, revert to snapshot, get properties, update vmware tools, clone, ...


3

Your new partition (/dev/sda4) is just after /dev/sda3, which should make things straightforward. Booting from a gparted live-CD (which, from your /dev/sr0, seems that you already have) and then resizing /dev/sda3 should work, but back up your /home first (you might have hard drive corruption if you lose power, your virtual machine or host OS ...


3

Install an NTP service on the virtual machine: sudo apt-get install ntp That way the virtual machine (assuming it has internet access) will set its time from a remote NTP server. If this is already installed, check that the service is running: sudo service ntp status If it is not, start it: sudo service ntp start Finally, you can force it to get ...


3

You can also use the tool zerofree to zero out all the blocks on disk that are unused. This can save you a significant amount of space. This method will require that you boot into an alternative OS such as Finnix. You could also use Parted Magic which comes with zerofree installed. Example Using Finnix: $ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get ...


3

If you actually want to run linux-0.01 (the one circa 1991), VMware may not be the best option (but see below). The VMware, being a high performance "same platform" VM, exposes much less details on the underlying execution context and less opportunities to tweaking it, compared to a full fledged platform simulator, such as QEMU or Bosch. However, to answer ...


3

A problem that I often encountered when cloning from a physical to a virtual machine is that the initrd is often not appropriate anymore. You should boot your VM on another OS, using a livecd or whatever, then : mount your centos root partition to /mnt, and other partitions to appropriate subdirectory bind mount /dev, /sys and /proc to /mnt/dev, /mnt/sys ...


2

The best idea would probably to look at the hardware. At least with VirtualBox you can easily determine that you are on a virtual machine, due to the names of some of the hardware devices (for example /sys/block/sda/device/model will say "VBOX HARDDISK"). Since all your machines are VMware, just pick one of those things and check that.


2

Presuming that you have a DHCP server set up on your internal network, all you should need to do is to configure the VMware virtual NIC to be in bridged mode; this tells VMWare to act as a virtual bridge with respect to any packets the virtual machine sends out. When I say a vitrual bridge, I mean a device that just crosses the border between virtual and ...


2

a) Removing cups doesn't actually remove CUPS. b) you want to use apt-get purge not remove, probably. You want to purge this lot, at a minimum. You can do it with a wildcard or regex. apt-get purge '^cups' seems to delete all packages beginning with cups, but really we want all files containing cups. Regex experts to the rescue, please. :-) See apt-get ...


2

You've defined a gateway on both interfaces. So there is a default route through both interfaces. I'm not sure what exactly happens in this case, but I doubt this is what you intended. I suspect that only a smaller network should be accessible through eth0. You can do this by changing the corresponding stanza like this: iface eth0 inet static address ...


2

Ran into this exact issue today and the xrandr command above didn't work for me. The actual config file is: ~/.config/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-xml/displays.xml Changed the Resolution line back to 800x600 and i was good: <property name="Resolution" type="string" value="800x600"/>


2

Assuming you are running VMware ESXi platform. First you can try dmidecode -t processor from the guest. If that doesn't provide what you need, go grab the Viper toolkit or the ViJava toolkit so you can automate queries against the ESXi server to obtain the information you need.


2

Easy. Go into your VM as root. Type "fdisk -l" - if you already see the new disk size - good. If not - try partprobe - if you still do not see the new disk size - reboot. Now fdisk /dev/sda Write down you starting cylinder for the second partition. "Delete" the second partiton Recreate the second partiton, same starting cylinder, last cylinder for end ...


2

Yes, it is intended to run in the guest OS. A small balloon module is loaded into the guest OS as a pseudo-device driver or kernel service. It has no external interface within the guest, and communicates with ESX Server via a private channel. When the server wants to reclaim memory, it instructs the driver to inflate'' by allocating pinned physical pages ...


2

Updating xserver-xorg-input-vmmouse to version 1:12.9.0-0ubuntu0.1 (no need to specify the version though, just sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-input-vmmouse will do) seems to be the way to fix it. It worked for me! For reference, I found out about it there: http://communities.vmware.com/thread/400750 ...


2

You are hitting a VMware Player limitation. VMware Player takes advantage of the latest hardware to create virtual machines with up to 4 virtual processors, 2 TB virtual disks and up to 64 GB of memory per virtual machines. VirtualBox has a much higher limit (32, as far as I can tell).


2

Take a look at the VMware SDK for Perl which is bundled with vSphere Command-Line Interface (vCLI), which is the unix pendant for PowerCLI. You can download it from http://www.vmware.com/support/developer/viperltoolkit/index.html


2

Office alternatives- Open office or Libre office (open office fork) #1 - NTFS works just fine minus the unix permissions. Issues- My main issue is that I cant seem to set executable permission to files on NTFS. I expect there are other issues with unable to own files, modifiable by all users of the system, etc. However this might be irrelevant if we are ...


2

It isn't enough to create a new disk, you have to create a filesystem on it. The exact command used depends on the filesystem type, a command provided by Fedora is mkfs(8), a frontend to the various commands doing it for each filessytem type. Or it is called something like mke2fs (for ext2/3/4), mkxfs (for xfs), ... Check the release notes for your ...


2

I would make sure that AMD-V is enabled in your physical systems BIOS. Fedora 13 Virtualization Troubleshooting Guide BIOS Something like this: VirtualBox (enable VT-x/AMD-V) Something like this: VirtualBox (enable PAE) Something like this:



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