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104

Assuming you can get everything working, and you don't want to do resource intensive tasks such as playing games or doing large compiles, then I think you'll be fine. There's some basic issues you will probably encounter: guest time incorrect guest screen size or color depth incorrect can't access USB devices (printers, phones, etc.) To fix this, you ...


57

LVM is designed in a way that keeps it from really getting in the way very much. From the userspace point of view, it looks like another layer of "virtual stuff" on top of the disk, and it seems natural to imagine that all of the I/O has to now pass through this before it gets to or from the real hardware. But it's not like that. The kernel already needs to ...


55

I teach a hands-on class on Linux, and unfortunately, by company policy I'm not allowed to reformat the class-provided laptops, so we're going by the VirtualBox guest approach. Ignoring all performance concerns, here are some notes / problems I noticed: 1) Bridged mode and Wireless Some wireless cards apparently have difficulty having "dual identities", ...


33

dmidecode -s system-product-name I have tested on Vmware Workstation, VirtualBox, QEMU with KVM, standalone QEMU with Ubuntu as the guest OS. Others have added additional platforms that they're familiar with as well. Virtualization technolgies VMware Workstation root@router:~# dmidecode -s system-product-name VMware Virtual Platform VirtualBox ...


19

Don't forget that a VM is an emulation. Your Unix system will never be as powerful in a VM than installed. Archlinux is made to fit your tastes, it is a distribution you can customize to it's maximum. I used to make it run on a VM, though I thought about installing it definitely on my computer. Now my system boots in about 15 seconds, my builds are a looooot ...


15

There are three ways you could set up the two OSs: Windows host, Linux VM (as you have it). Linux host, Windows VM. Dual boot. If you want to run Windows games I would not recommend option 2. If you regularly want to use a Windows only program (that doesn't run well under Wine) during your Linux session then option 3 won't work well for you. If you use ...


13

What graphical environment are you using in Linux? Most of the modern desktop environments (GNOME, KDE, Unity) are moving towards requiring hardware 3D acceleration support to work properly. Hardware acceleration support for graphics inside VMs is a relatively immature technology at the moment. VirtualBox has experimental support.


12

If you use this box mainly via SSH, there's a good chance that you're in the butter zone where it really doesn't matter much whether it's a VM or on real hardware. Many of the problems mentioned in other answers come up when you're trying to use the guest OS as a GUI desktop. Linux servers are very happy inside VMs; a huge chunk of the web hosting market is ...


12

I am logged in as root over SSH...It is a remote machine running Debian. Is it actually a remote machine, or a just a remote system? If this is a VPS slice somewhere, (at least some forms of) OS virtualization (e.g. openVZ) won't permit this from within the container. You don't run the machine, you just run your slice.


10

LVM, like everything else, is a mixed blessing. With respect to performance, LVM will hinder you a little bit because it is another layer of abstraction that has to be worked out before bits hit (or can be read from) the disk. In most situations, this performance hit will be practically unmeasurable. The advantages of LVM include the fact that you can add ...


10

Chroot is the lightest weight environment that could suit you. It allows you to install another distribution (or another installation of the same distribution), with the same users, with the same network configuration, etc. Chroot only provides some crude isolation at the filesystem level. Browsing this site for chroot might help, if you're still not sure ...


10

Basically everything will be working fine from internet to installing packages also for initializing hardware, however you will be paying the price for any failure of the windows machine.


8

The purpose of multiple options here is a matter of compatibility, not performance. They all do essentially the same thing, so any performance differences are likely to be implementation maturity issues rather than inherent flaws in the format's design. VDI will have received the most attention in VirtualBox, VMDK in VMware, etc. My advice, then, is to ...


8

You're question is well defined, but you're not giving a lot of information about your environment, how you're currently monitoring or what graphing tools you're using. However, given that SNMP is used pretty much universally for that I'll assume that you're using it and have at least some familiarity with it. Although (as near as I can tell) the CPU Steal ...


8

Desirable method lshw This command produces the following output on vairous VM technology guests. $ sudo lshw -class system Output KVM mungr description: Computer product: KVM vendor: Red Hat width: 64 bits capabilities: smbios-2.4 dmi-2.4 vsyscall64 vsyscall32 Virtual Box fedora17 ...


7

This is a big topic, but I'll try to keep it short. You could try DevStack, which will get you up and running with less configuration work. If you want to really understand the inner workings of the platform, and since you have the hardware, I would go ahead and install it from scratch on your distro of choice (CentOS and Fedora are fully supported ...


7

The shred command can zero out a file. To do what you want, I think something like this should work find /var/cache/pacman/pkg -type f -exec shred -n 0 -z {} \; \ && rm -rf /var/cache/pacman/pkg/*


7

This is normal behavior under OS-level virtualization. This can only be executed by someone with root access to the hardware node. With for example OpenVZ, you don't get your own kernel instance and as such, are restricted from performing commands like this. All share the same page cache, so to drop caches of only your instance, the kernel must check if ...


6

First: packages and ports are entirely two separate things. There is no such thing as "packages from ports". From the FAQ: Packages are the pre-compiled binaries of some of the most used third party software. Packages can be managed easily with the help of several utilities, also referred to as the pkg* tools. and from the section on Ports: As ...


6

VirtualBox claims to support this feature, according to the manual: Essentially this feature allows to directly use physical PCI devices on the host by the guest even if host doesn't have drivers for this particular device. Both, regular PCI and some PCI Express cards, are supported. AGP and certain PCI Express cards are not supported at the moment if ...


6

I use a similar configuration, and I find it incredibly useful simply because I can copy and move my work Linux VM between machines. I have only found two significant downsides to using a VM. If the host is using a wireless network connection, a vpn is very unreliable in the guest Multi monitor setups generally suck in a VM. Point number 2 can ...


6

The -march flag permits the compiler to use instructions that are not supported by other CPUs. There are a few instructions that are legal to use with -march=athlon64 that your i7 does not support. These are the 3DNow! and Enhanced 3DNow! instructions that weren't included in MMX or integer SSE. If the code uses instructions like PFPNACC it will fault on ...


6

No matter the fancy name used here, both are solutions to a specific problem: A better segregation solution than classic Unix chroot. Operating system-level virtualization, containers, zones, or even "chroot with steriods" are names or commercial titles that defines the same concept of userspace separation, but with different features. Chroot was introduced ...


5

Afaik, libvirt doesn't know what "fully booted" means (neither do I). You could make a service that connect to your host (or another machine) during boot. Or you could try connecting in a loop to your guest, for example with ssh. Another solution would be to rely on an exisiting service that communicate with the host, such as vdagent. You could easily write ...


5

How about Virtualbox? Works great for me, though I use it the other way around (Linux host, Windows in the VM). Within the VM, Windows recognize both cores so I assume it can use them both.


5

Docker makes LXC easier to use: Notable features Filesystem isolation: each process container runs in a completely separate root filesystem. Resource isolation: system resources like cpu and memory can be allocated differently to each process container, using cgroups. Network isolation: each process container runs in its own ...


5

I'd recommend not using LVM inside your VMs. It doesn't buy you much flexibility that you couldn't get at the hypervisor level. Remember, the hypervisor is already effectively performing these tasks. If you want to be able to arbitrarily resize file systems (a fine idea), just create a separate virtual disk for each filesystem. One thing you might think ...


5

If you are not using VMs for special purposes (e.g., need to clone VMs; copy/move between servers; have multiple different test environments; etc), I'd suggest installing linux as the primary OS for your 95% of activities, and then install windows as a VM from within linux for your 5% activity of windows activities. (Unless your 5% of windows activity is ...


5

My power consumption rises drastically whenever I start VirtualBox. In my case, I run Linux as both host and guest, and I don't know if the host/guest OS makes a difference, or if this is inherent to either VirtualBox or the virtualization technique. Using powertop I can see that the process "VBoxHeadless" is frequently the single largest consumer of power ...


5

sar -u might be helpful in your case. sar is normally part of the sysstat-package.



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