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I found a case when I tried to use gummiboot instead of grub. Gummiboot reported error, that it cant find kernel images. It looks like I mounted /boot and configured fstab after I installed base system with pacstrap -i. So kernel images, that were placed in a /boot directory were lost after mounting and thus system could not boot. I wonder what happened with ...


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Did you export the esp variable for the grub-install command to use? If not, grub has no idea where the efi directory is located. # export esp=/boot/efi # grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=$esp ..... Archlinux supports EFISTUB, removing the need for a bootloader. See EFISTUB for more info. If you would like to try an EFI only bootloader, ...


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Check /etc/yum.conf (or any other yum.conf that your yum might by using. Check for the following line: exclude=kernel* Comment out that line, do a yum clean all and try yum update again and it should go through fine. This line is asking yum to exclude the kernel from getting updated. You are getting that error since kernel is not getting updated, but a ...


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Your installation of libvirtd needs to be configured to handle the vbox+ssh connection type. Details on how to do this are covered here, titled: VirtualBox hypervisor driver. There's a sample domain XML config that you'll need to load into libvirtd so that it knows how to talk to the VirtualBox VM. excerpt - sample config <domain type='vbox'> ...


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Okay, I found a link that solves the issue: http://askubuntu.com/questions/451805/screen-resolution-problem-with-ubuntu-14-04-and-virtualbox Type the following into terminal, and it should work! sudo apt-get install virtualbox-guest-dkms virtualbox-guest-utils virtualbox-guest-x11 I'm not sure how that's any different from installing the virtual CD, ...


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Here's the problem: -A INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited ## More rules iptables walk-through all the rules in order, it finds that you reject all INPUT packages first even if you accept them later on. Reorder your rules so the REJECT are to the very end, and your ACCEPTS are at the very top. Also, remove the duplicated entries. It should ...


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The instructions you followed appear to have a typo in the mount -o remount, rw / line. There should not be a space after the comma. The corrected line should read: mount -o remount,rw / If you entered it with the space as indicated in the document, the passwd command will not change the root password because the system is still in a read-only state.


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The only reason I know of is if you don't have a 64-bit CPU. The host OS doesn't matter, and if hardware virtualisation is not enabled (vtx in BIOS settings) you can still create the VM but it will tell you what's wrong when you try to start it.


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You need to create a 64bit virtual machine. The bitness of the host OS is irrelevant, it's the VM that needs to be 64bit. From the VBox website (emphasis mine): 64-bit guests VirtualBox supports 64-bit guest operating systems, even on 32-bit host operating systems, provided that the following conditions are met: You need a 64-bit processor ...


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Apparently it's a bug with the installer that happens if you choose the italian language, and it doesn't create the directory /target/proc. Pretty strange, but anyway, I fixed it by changing language in the installation.


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The version installed does not include a GUI. As the response from the terminal indicates, you'll probably want to install virtualbox-qt for that.


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The best way is subjective but there are a couple of them: Make your own ISO already containing the VBox modules for the included kernel. (See [1], [2], or [3].) This might generally be the preferred option if you can and if you're going to use it a lot, but if you're only going to use it once it might be considered a bit of a waste of time. Upload the ...


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Figured it out as trivial as it sounds. Went to Machine -> Settings -> Network -> Adapter under VirtualBox. Managed to add virtual adapters and hence more interfaces were generated.


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"Bridged networking" will set up a bridge and connect the single interface of each VM to that bridge. VirtualBox will all so add your hosts network connection to that bridge. Therefore VMs can talk to each other and also access to the outside like the internet. This especially means that both VMs are it the same LAN and can directly connect to each other. ...


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$> dmesg | grep eth This will show you the instances of Ethernet adapters detected by your Linux Kernel. I believe that you are requiring a TUN/TAP virtual interfaces if the virtual machines are hosted on your Linux system. Within the output of the command at the top of my Answer, you will see all your Ethernet interfaces detected. Please tell me if ...


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It's easiest to: Use VBoxManage to resize the Virtual Disk. You've already done this. Download A Gparted Live ISO Set Virtualbox to boot the GParted Live CD, on the VM Disk you resized in step 1. Complete the Resizing Operations in GParted, as GParted >=0.14.x supports LVM Shutdown the VM and remove the ISO from the virtual drive. Restart the VM. Twiddle ...


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I had a lot of similar troubles. A few things: do the VDI resize whilst the machine is powered off resize the partition with fdisk before resizing anything related to LVM you've possibly set your /dev/sda2 to extend past the end of the disk if you also have /dev/sda1 (you used the full 20G for /dev/sda2, but it probably does not start at 0) I found this ...


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First, I create a partition type 8e(LVM) on /dev/sda3, and extend current volume group size by adding physical volume into volume group u64 vgextend u64 /dev/sda3. Second, extend logical volume root lvextend -L+22g u64/root. Third, resize the ext4 filesystem resize2fs /dev/mapper/u64-root. Similarly, extend the swap logical volume lvextend -L+3g ...



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