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Instead of setting a static IP like others suggested, I simply enabled "Bridged Adapter Mode" under "Network Connections", and then this made it such that each new virtual machine I made automatically had a new IP address. If you click "Bridged Adapter Mode" and it doesn't have any choices (i.e.the only option is "Not Selected"), then you can simply go to ...


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Virtualbox is acting as a DHCP server for these virtual machines. You can either define static IP addresses for these machines, or simply set the IP address manually on each machine. If you don't know how to set a static IP address on your Linux system you need to learn how to do this, so I would suggest you go with the second option. There are detailed ...


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I have used Virtual box also for testing. From windows 95 to 7 and Linux ;). I have used the NAT mode and then assign an static ip and always this has been working in any OS. This will work inside the same ip range from the LAN. Also please refer to this part of the documentation I guess this is a better way and the one required for yourself ...


1

Instead of using an USB filter, just connect the wireless network on the host operating system, and define a bridged or NAT connection in the VM configuration. On the image referenced in the comments, you have both a bridged adapter to wlan1 and an USB filter. According to the VirtualBox manual, section 3.10: "VirtualBox can allow virtual machines to ...


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This is an old thread but came up in my search for a similar issue. In case anyone else runs into this, the following answer solved it for me: http://www.if-not-true-then-false.com/2010/install-virtualbox-guest-additions-on-fedora-centos-red-hat-rhel/ Note* The URL says 2010 but the article was updated in 2013.


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VirtualBox will create a private network (10.0.2.x) which will be connected to your host network using NAT. (Unless configured otherwise.) This means that you cannot directly access any host of the private network from then host network. To do so, you need some port forwarding. In the network preferences of your VM you can for example configure that ...


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First you need to decide if you VM connected to your host machine via a bridge connection or via a NAT, but ether way you'll need to put the VM IP address in putty to be able to connect to ip, in the VM terminal run this command to show you the machine IP address (and no 127.0.0.1 is not the machine IP address) VM # ip addr show 1: lo: ...


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you are able to ping and ssh to the VM, So I guess it is not a firewall problem, I guess your httpd service isn't running: try to run it using: service httpd start or: /etc/init.d/httpd start httpd should installed on centos by default!!!!, to install httpd you can simply do this on centos: yum install httpd to set the apache service to start on ...


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After installing the VBOXADDITIONS you might need to do this: In VirtualBox click View>>Auto Resize Guest Display (Host + G) because the screen resolution did not work for me until I applied this final configuration to VirtualBox.


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Assuming you're on a Linux host as well (you didn't mention that). You can always try the Network Block Device (NBD) option:- sudo modprobe nbd max_part=16 sudo qemu-nbd -c /dev/nbd0 <path to your vdi file> ls -lh /dev/nbd0* <lists all the partitions on the vdi> Choose which of the partitions you want to mount (eg 1st partition), then: sudo ...


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The difference between Basic Server and Desktop is just the type of packages that are installed. These just represent different starting points for an installation. Typically, as you work on your server and find you need "server" programs that were not installed in the Desktop version, you can easily install them with yum. If you want to make sure you ...


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If you are abe to boot the guest OS then I think you need to install a package which will work as a recovery tool for your file system.Remember the packege will change from Filesystem to file system.Few which i know are available at for ext4 http://extundelete.sourceforge.net/ you can also check this out ...


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I had a similar problem (no yum and couldn't even ping the mirrorlist) and I had to go through the following steps to at least get to ping the mirrorlist: Set the network for one adapter to 'Attached to:' NAT as kumarprd said Change the file /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 (for example using vi): BOOTPROTO=dhcp ONBOOT=yes NM_CONTROLLED=no ...


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Quite simple. 8GB isn't enough for this version of Kali Linux. Use VBoxManage to resize the virtual disk, and GParted to expand the filesystem.


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Try setting one of these in /etc/grub: iommu=memmaper iommu=soft vga=normal vesa=0 I have new AMD 64bit system and found that Linux has trouble with Nvidia and DMA setting caused by iommu settings in BIOS, so setting these in grub fixed it for me. Read this for more detail.


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Installing an operating system in VirtualBox would be the same experience as launching the installer on a computer without anything else installed. If you're going to install it on your MacBook, it's going to be insanely difficult as it is a completely different hardware set up then a normal PC. Even loading the installer was difficult for me.


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I would sum it up this way : the base procedure will be exactly the same, though the results may differ. Here's where you may find the most significant changes : Drives configuration : your physical drive does not use the same technology, and does not have the same properties (size, ...) as the virtual one. Still, partitioning, formatting and mounting are ...


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For the most part, yes it is the same. The real differences you'll encounter when doing this as a host OS (compared to a client VM OS) is that VMs emulate very common hardware. If you real machine uses less common hardware you may need to install drivers which aren't usually needed in a VM. The other difference is going to be your hard drive setup. In a VM ...


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The RAM is freed as soon as you turn off the VM. So yes, if you delete it, the RAM is freed.


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Vagrant machines share a directory, /vagrant, between host and guest. The entire filesystem isn't shared but anything in that directory is. It's the root of your vagrant project on the host machine and /vagrant on the guest.


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In your OpenVPN config files you are using tun interfaces, which operate at layer 3. That's fine, and probably what you want, but won't work with (ethernet) bridging because that requires layer 2 support. You can solve your problem in two ways. Either: use iptables to route traffic from your tun interface to the host of your choice, or use tap interfaces ...


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Settings->Video-> Video Memory = 128 MB, Enable 3D acceleration = true. Install GuestAdditions On Host machine, in cmd/bash, run VBoxManage setextradata global GUI/MaxGuestResolution any create /etc/X11/xorg.conf file with content: Section "Device" Identifier "Configured Video Device" EndSection Section "Monitor" Identifier ...



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