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0

Next to the others, here is an idea. Shared memory (and the other sysvipc features) are mapped in linux into an internal filesystem. Effectively, if you create/attach/detach/delete a shared memory segment, the related system calls are using the filesystem api to make the correspoinding operations similarly, as if you would work on tmpfs files. By, analogy, ...


2

If you need in depth scheduling info, you could use one of these tools - perf SystemTap dtrace (I dont know what the state of the linux port is) sysdig All of these can tap into kernel hooks to display events such as context switches, interrupts, I/O, system calls etc.


2

You can get a lot of internal information about processes, the scheduler, and other components of the OS and the hardware by using cat /proc/... where ... can be many things. For instance, it could be a process ID, followed by a lot of specific information request, or scheduler debug information request, for example: cat /proc/sched_debug To see the ...


2

The ps command is a good place to start. It allows you to specify what information to display for a set of selected processes (possibly all processes). You can read the man page for detailed information on the available information you can get, which are specified as flags to the -O option. The following is a start for what you might want: ps -O "%mem ...


0

This will currently only work with version 1.30.0-ish or higher, it does not work on any current version of ubuntu, unless you build from source. virt-sysprep -a CentOS-6-x86_64-GenericCloud-1601.qcow2 --root-password password:asd --ssh-inject root:file:/root/my.key.pub


1

Assuming you have sufficient access rights to the device, you should be able to access the hidden partition from the VM by creating a special vmdk file that will map the raw partition to a virtual device. You need to first identify the wanted partition with something like: C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox> VBoxManage internalcommands listpartitions ...


1

To backup a qcow2, you have to quisece the filesystem (if it's running and qemu-guest-agent is running on the guest) and convert it to raw. # qemu-img convert -O raw qcow2image.vm convertedraw.vm When you want to restore it, you have to convert it back. Reverse order, changing the -O switch's value. # qemu-img convert -O qcow2 convertedraw.vm ...


1

Of course the answer is very opinion based, but I would go with Ubuntu (or any of its derivatives like Kubuntu) as it offers a huge community (e.g. at http://ubuntuforums.org/ or the askubuntu part of the stack network) that is really helpful. Also, many blog posts etc. deal with Ubuntu. As you are new to Linux, this is what you should look out for. On the ...


0

I think this is a matter of opinion. Also, take in account there is hundreds of posts in Internet informing about the differences between distributions. http://lifehacker.com/5889950/how-to-find-the-perfect-linux-distribution-for-you Anyway, I agree with the link, I am also a beginner and using Linux Mint.


0

There is an answer to this question right here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/56198 The easiest way to check your workstation is to download the VMware Processor Check for 64-Bit Compatibility tool from the VMware website. You can't run a 64-bit VM session on a 32-bit processor. However, you can run a 64-bit VM session if you have a 64-bit ...


0

Well, not exactly. VT-X is an extension for virtualisation, enabling the guest system direct access to certain resources. It is used by hypervisors ("VMWare" "Virtual Box" etc.). If you want to run a 64bit Guest system, you need to have a 64bit Host machine. But you can run a 32bit Guest system on any Host (32 or 64 bit).


0

Problem with running GUI appears,because Debian moved into libraries built with boost.I have the same issue on my Debian unstable notebook with it.


-1

All of these answers work in some cases but not others. For example, you can depend on dmesg while boot-up log details are still in the ring buffer, but it will likely fail on a machine that has been running for any length of time. Worse, a message might be logged by the bare metal OS concerning a running hypervisor, in which case a naive test like dmesg | ...


0

The easiest way to regain the old interface names is the modification of the grub file that you did (although I am unfamiliar with the biosdevname parameter. I would place these in the line starting GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT. After you have modified /etc/default/grub, you must execute sudo update-grub and reboot so that the new parameters will take effect.


0

This is not something that is done via the "guest bios", to set up nested virtualization with KVM, there are specific guides per distribution, which you failed to mention.


0

What I've found out is that Gnome Boxes & Libvirt save mac-address for machines in config located here: /home/$USER/.config/libvirt/qemu So, to fix the issue, both machines must have different Mac-addresses, which can be fixed only by editing those files. Didn't find any relevant option in Gnome Boxes GUI.


7

If sudo -H -u $VMUSER VBoxManage list vms returns this: "GYO DB Clone" {1f6e2518-ed20-4d71-a974-1d4823db4a81} "GYO LB Clone" {6ba9a751-91ed-40a4-8a90-385559f67885} "GYO MC Clone" {8bd0d243-887f-49dd-966f-6c104e451277} "GYO Web Clone" {1229d75d-f046-4f3e-b15a-2d6c91b1e0d4} "GYO DB 1" {5274eb5f-d0fe-46dd-8aaf-6d23728790b1} "GYO LB 1" ...


0

There was a comment on your other question that said to use a hypervisor (i.e. instead of installing an OS directly). Do that. Then install Arch, Windows, and everything else as VMs from the hypervisor. The hypervisor is your base operating system, and it's only a VM host. That will give you the best performance possible for each of your VMs running inside ...



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