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The information about Tests and test Suites is at OpenBenchmarking.com. The website has been redesigned completely recently to collaborate with the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 6.4 and to offer advanced information about the tests in a neat and comprehensive way .


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In general Unix Domain Sockets cannot communicate between host OS and guest OS. Unix Domain Sockets are, like e.g. Named Pipes, bound to the OS kernel. If you open the same Unix Domain Socket file node in the host and the guest, you get two different virtual network connections. One in the host kernel and one in the guest kernel. These are completely ...


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If you have set up a virtual serial console for your VM, you can use the virsh console command to connect to it. You will have to use an expect script to login with username and password, run your command(s), extract the output, and then logout. Note, though, that expect is a single-purpose language and, IMO, there's no point in learning/using it if you ...


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If you are entering your service name correctly, I think your problem causes from lack of Environment Variables. From service command manual: service runs a System V init script in as predictable environment as possible. It's better to use full path of your service file like: /etc/init.d/network-manager Therefor for restarting your service use: ...


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When booting tails i think there is option "more" where you can choose a root password for the session. Try to get a console and run dmesg.


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The -drive option takes parameters that look like this: qemu-system-x86_64 -drive format=raw,file=x86-64.img ... you need to use commas between its "sub"-options, not spaces. For example, here is one I tested to boot a Debian Installer CD: qemu-system-x86_64 -drive format=raw,media=cdrom,readonly,file=debian-8.2.0-amd64-DVD-1.iso


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Solution was to create the image in the openSUSE VM using SUSE Studio Image Writer, instead of ImageUSB, as the Windows program does not appear to image the ISO correctly. SUSE Studio Image Writer created a clean openSUSE installation and booted to it without issue.


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Sorry that I don't know much about openSUSE, but under Debian there is a package called util-linux. There you'll find a tool called "lsblk", which will list all your installed block-devices, except RAM-Disks. Just type: lsblk I hope this will help.


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The scripts which get ip and system info will be run on boot, so i restart getty@tty1 in same script and it worked.


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Solaris 10 has a Common Criteria evaluation at EAL4+ of the Labelled Security Protection Profile. That separation is provided by Zones. Zones were designed to provide exactly this separation when deployed in the Trusted Extensions configuration. The original question describes a pretty much classic use case for a Solaris Trusted Extensions and there are ...


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There are with no doubt security mechanism in place to isolate non-global zones from each other as this is actually how zones were implemented by design. Excerpt from Introduction to Oracle® Solaris Zones A process assigned to a zone can manipulate, monitor, and directly communicate with other processes that are assigned to the same zone. The ...


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The answer is kinda yes and kinda no. Zones rely on the same kernel running on the hosting LDOM or the physical server. If he kernel gets breached, all of them are hosed. But as far as server roles are considered, you can say that they are isolated, provided you did your networking setup due diligence real well. In an ideal world, you do not resort to this ...


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You have the right tools in place to do what you want. The two steps you need to take are to move the extended disk to the end of the unallocated space, then you can grow /dev/sda1. Until you move the swap space out of the way, then you cannot make sda1 bigger. From the screen that you have up: Select the extended partition /dev/sda2. It includes ...


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Yes, you can. Also you need to have a qemu-kvm and libvirt-bin packages installed.


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64-bit CPUs are usually capable of nativley running 32-bit code. It is possible to run a 32-bit OS on a 64-bit processor. You can test with a bootable 32-bit DVD or USB. If you had a 32-bit CPU you would not be able to run a 64-bit virtual machine natively. An emulator could run the code, but very slowly.



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