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Virtual interfaces do not artificially limit throughput to a particular data rate, like a physical interface would. However, they do incur software overhead, so you should expect transfer rates to be lower compared to simpler inter-process communication mechanisms, unless the bottleneck is some other factor.


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Docker's website states that it can be installed on any 64 bit distribution of RHEL. However, the kernel must be 3.10 at a minimum. Check your kernel version first with the following command: uname -r.


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The information about Tests and test Suites is at OpenBenchmarking.com. The website has been redesigned completely recently to collaborate with the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 6.4 and to offer advanced information about the tests in a neat and comprehensive way .


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If you have set up a virtual serial console for your VM, you can use the virsh console command to connect to it. You will have to use an expect script to login with username and password, run your command(s), extract the output, and then logout. Note, though, that expect is a single-purpose language and, IMO, there's no point in learning/using it if you ...


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In general Unix Domain Sockets cannot communicate between host OS and guest OS. Unix Domain Sockets are, like e.g. Named Pipes, bound to the OS kernel. If you open the same Unix Domain Socket file node in the host and the guest, you get two different virtual network connections. One in the host kernel and one in the guest kernel. These are completely ...


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Google says this is a known bug. The recommended fix from that bug seems to be to use a (more) recent version of libvirt and virt-viewer, but there's no evidence that this will help.


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This configuration works but it's a bit messed up. The output of parted shows that you have just 2 usable partitions: 1 1049kB 256MB 255MB primary ext2 boot This is the boot partition. 2 257MB 107GB 107GB extended 5 257MB 107GB 107GB logical lvm This is the main (root) partition, using LVM, ...


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Typically virtual box and VMware both configure the network connection to the vm via the host to be NAT based, on an isolated subnet from the the test of the LAN. This has the benefits and drawbacks of the NAT implementation on most peoples home routers. You aren't 'visible' to the network/internet unless you initiate the traffic or configure port ...


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A workaround to the situation appears to be to toggle the link state of the VM right after starting it, i.e. on the command line do: $ VBoxManage startvm <vmid> $ VBoxManage controlvm <vmid> setlinkstate1 off $ VBoxManage controlvm <vmid> setlinkstate1 on



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