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1

I've found solution here. In general: Run PuTTY Configuration. In the left pane, select Terminal, Features. Put a check mark next to "Disable application keypad mode". In the left pane, select Session. Save the settings.


1

You'll have spaces at the end of the line when selecting and copying from the terminal if the application displayed spaces at that spot. Applications may display spaces in order to erase what was there before. Terminals have commands to delete a whole line or delete characters to the right of the cursor; applications choose between that and displaying spaces ...


1

Copy & pasting from a terminal screen is never going to be fully reliable because it's dealing with screen output instead of original source material. If some applications echo text to the terminal in an unusual fashion and it results in the terminal not being able to guess what the original text was, there's probably not much you or the terminal can do ...


2

Try this: esc + b + i esc puts you in normal mode b goes to the beginning of the previous word i puts you in insert mode.


2

In normal mode, type b + i with your cursor at the end of "this".


0

I found out the problem happened due to default path of vim goes to /usr/bin/vim or /usr/local/bin/vim, which does not provide python feature, instead of vim-nox. I realized this problem by using which command to investigate. Therefore, I simply made an alias for vim as vim.nox. alias vim='vim.nox'


1

You can do it with command line version of put: :put z The full syntax is :[line]pu[t] [x]. Please see :help :put for more information. On a side note: Vim geeks' den is this way.


1

I find that adding the file to the top of the window using, set title in the .vimrc, is less obnoxious then always having the status bar taking up a full line at the bottom.


0

maxschlepzig: This is an old thread but I hope it may be still useful to provide info that I just learnt about vim-slime. You can configure the following keybinding (F2 in this case) in .vimrc to send current line. vmap <F2> :SlimeSend<CR> nmap <F2> :SlimeSend<CR> F2 can be replaced by any other key.


1

As you're already using it, I'd recommend tmux as fully supports copy and paste - see the manual page for more information. You can see the current key bindings by using the tmux list-keys command - look for the begin-selection, copy-selection and paste-buffer commands in that list. By default, the bindings are: [ - Start copy/paste mode h, j, k, l - vi ...


0

Unfortunately it's not possible to save a GNU screen session. As you can imagine, with the complexity of what gets done in a terminal session, tracking and managing that would be incredibly difficult. What I'd suggest is setting up your screen configuration so that it starts up with your preferred window layout, applications, etc. There's a similar question ...


2

Note in several Debian based distros the symbolic link in /bin/vi is to 'busybox' and not vim at all. In some cases this can be OK but the features busybox provides are a minimum set and for some reason seem to vary on how busybox was compiled. If vim is installed it usually replaces the busybox link -- but sometimes not so -- busybox may still be linked ...


-1

You can do this: $vim +number_line file and after press Shift+A. Alternatively, you can do /word_to_find and then press i to edit.


0

Move the cursor to the uppermost character (if you’re selecting lines the way down, bottom if you’re going up) before which you want to insert text Enter Visual Block Mode by pressing Ctrl+v (unless you mapped the paste action to it, in which case you probably already know how to column insert) Select the column using the arrow keys and Press Shift+i ...


0

Not sure if you would like KDE, but that has something called activities. These are basically desktop sessions you can save. So for example you could have several terminals open, a few documents, maybe an IDE...whatever you happen to have open. Then before you restart, you can simply save that activity. You can create as many activities as you like. You can ...


0

The short answer would be hibernation because is the best option. However the gnome-session-save functionality was removed, it was buggy and the official tweak to manually re-enable this functionality does not appear to work. Other option would be to use an alternative hibernation after a shutdown with TuxOnIce which is more compatible and reliable right now ...


1

It seems, you messed up /etc/profile. Normally PATH is defined in /etc/profile and $HOME/.profile.


4

You almost have it with your second command. You did it correctly with the first, just use the same shell sequence expansion: vim directory_{0..10}/results/output.txt You should see something in the shell about opening 11 files. Then you can use vim to iterate through each one.


1

Assuming your visual-mode selection is limited to the lines with just foo(...);, the best that I can come up with is: :let c=2|'<,'>g//let c=c+1|s/\v\S+/\="case ".c.": retVal = ".submatch(0)." break;"/ More readably: let counter = 2 '<,'>g// " for some reason, we need both markers and g// for `let` to work let counter ...


0

In vim :echo &ft results nothing in a file without suffix. So there isn't a type for files without suffix. But what you could do is set a default colorscheme for all files (including files without suffix) and then with autocmd set different colorscheme for files with certain types



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