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1

In vim, :goto 6 or, 6go will move the cursor to the graphem that contains the 6th byte in the current buffer. If the offset points to a newline character, it will position the cursor at the end of the corresponding line (on you sample, 40go and 41go will bring the cursor to the same position).


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Another way using od -- od -An -c -j 5 -N1 file i


1

Cut is what you are looking for. cut -b6 file1.txt This shows you the 6th byte...per line of the file. I think you only want the 6th byte so you can use something like head head -n1 file1.txt | cut -b6 Voila.


0

From the POSIX specifications for ex: Implementations wanting to provide a counterpart to the next command that edited the previous file have used the command prev[ious], which takes no file argument. POSIX.1-2008 does not require this command. So, in most implementations, :prev will do what you want. (That is, most implementations of ex that I've ...


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Given the vi tag on this question, and the fact that I've found that automated file editing with POSIX-compliant ex commands gets short shrift on this site compared to the plethora of advice on sed, awk, grep and even Perl, here is a POSIX-compliant ex command that will perform the desired filtering: ex -sc 'g/.*\(on line\)/s//\1/ | .w!>>output q!' ...


0

If your grep doesn't support the -o option: sed 's/^.*\(on line\)/\1/' temp.text > out.txt Or if you only want the lines that contain on line: sed -n 's/^.*\(on line\)/\1/p' temp.text > out.txt Note that if there are several occurrences of on line, it prints the portion of the line that starts with the rightmost occurrence of it. For the leftmost ...


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start cmd:> awk 'lines[$0]++ == 0' input Hi how are you hello today is monday I am fine


5

This is an easy job for sort, use the unique (-u) option of sort: % sort -u file1.txt hello Hi how are you I am fine today is monday To save it in file2.txt: sort -u file1.txt >file2.txt If you want to preserve the initial order: % nl file1.txt | sort -uk2,2 | sort -k1,1n | cut -f2 Hi how are you hello today is monday I am fine


2

Try this: grep -o 'on line .*' temp.txt > out.txt The -o parameter makes grep only output the matching part of the line, which is what you want.


4

Use the -o option of grep to select only the desired portion, in your case use pattern on line .* to select the portion starting from on line till the end of the line(s): % grep -o 'on line .*' temp.txt >new.txt % cat new.txt on line jhkjhvjdbvjvbvbdjkvn on line fdgdgdgdd on line safffasffaf on line adaddsd



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