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1

You can execute: uname -r It will display something like 3.13.0-62-generic Found on http://askubuntu.com/questions/359574/how-do-i-find-out-the-kernel-version-i-am-running (view that QA to learn other commands you could use)


2

The third part of the version number is incremented for bugfix releases. 14.04.3 is the same Ubuntu release as 14.04, just with some bug fixes applied. The important part here is “Release: 14.04”, and to do security and bugfix updates in a timely manner. Once in a while, Ubuntu collects the security and major bug fix updates that have been performed so far ...


2

So I'm not sure if you're looking to do this programmatically or not. But the first step you'd need to accomplish this is a database that catalogues all of this sort of information for each distribution and their respective releases. Luckily… that is exactly what distrowatch.com is. You can gather this information using their advanced search page, which ...


15

Let's dive for an answer in random glibc repo in github. This version provides a „banner“ at file version.c: https://github.com/lattera/glibc/blob/a2f34833b1042d5d8eeb263b4cf4caaea138c4ad/csu/version.c In same file there is a few interesting points: __libc_print_version the function that provides printing to stdin same text and symbol __libc_main (void) ...


27

That library has a main() function or equivalent entry point, and was compiled in such a way that it is useful both as an executable and as a shared object. Here's one suggestion about how to do this, although it does not work for me. Here's another in an answer to a similar question on S.O, which I'll shamelessly plagiarize, tweak, and add a bit of ...



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