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Try fzf-fs. Install fzf: git clone --depth 1 https://github.com/junegunn/fzf.git ~/.fzf ~/.fzf/install Re-source your ~/.bashrc: . ~/.bashrc Clone fzf-fs: git clone https://github.com/D630/fzf-fs ~/fzf-fs Add ~/fzf-fs to your PATH: PATH=$PATH:~/fzf-fs Run fzf-fs --init Define an alias: alias vcd='. fzf-fs' Run vcd ~ You should see something like this: ...


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early unix commands get a two letter code, often with wowel removed. list (files in dir) -> ls copy (files) -> cp link (files) -> ln remove (files) -> rm C Compiler -> cc In this case, search for object name, this yield nm.


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It's an abbreviation for "names" or "name list". Nm prints the name list (symbol table) of each object file in the argument list. (V7 Unix manual, 1979) from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8858445/why-is-the-nm-utility-named-as-such


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CHange MODe. [root@localhost /]# apropos -e chmod -s 1 chmod (1) - change file mode bits [root@localhost /]#


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Something like PC Magazine's DM from back in the DOS days... I don't know of a similar program on Linux, but I quite like xd for navigating around directories; with a function defined as xd() { cd "$(/usr/bin/xd "$@")" } you can type for example xd /ulb which will print a list of all directories matching /u*/l*/b* (/usr/lib/binfmt.d, ...


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While I do not know a tool that fits your description, perhaps some of the small utilities mentioned below would be helpful? pushd and popd, described here along with other tools that can boost productivity while navigating around fasd - offers quick access to files and directories for POSIX shells autojump - a cd that learns z - a variation on the above ...


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Use inotify if you need to know immediately If you need to know about the newly created files immediately, you can actually wait for the event of creating a file in a directory, or in a directory tree, using the inotify API on linux (see man 7 inotify): You would combine this with parts of the other solutions to find out the detailed information about the ...


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From the last line with text: $Id: script-name.py 474 2010-12-10 12:16:36Z adminName $ you can assume that these files were kept in Subversion (there is an explanation of the $Id$ keyword here). The older CVS would also use the $Id$ keyword, but that would expand the filename to script-name.py,v (as is done here). The two entries before that could come ...


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These âs are UTF-8 quotes that your current terminal is unable to display properly, being configured in ISO-8859-1 or similar. You can have a proper display with setting a matching locale or the POSIX one: $ rm file.txt rm: cannot remove â file.txtâ : No such file or directory $ LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8 rm file.txt rm: cannot remove â file.txtâ : No such file ...


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If (and it's a big if) you cut-n-pasted the text exactly, and some clipboard didn't mangle it... You have a UTF-8 character in there, 2 bytes, C3 A2, which is: U+00E2, â, c3 a2, LATIN SMALL LETTER A WITH CIRCUMFLEX, both before and after the file name. When I issue the commands: alias rm='rm -i' rm spdkdkdkdlsls I get this from bash 4.3.39: rm: cannot ...


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Are you sure you did not add some wierd characters? try using vi with ':set list' to see non-human readable characters in your .bashrc. Type just 'aliases' and see if any system aliases are there, they might indicate the correct syntax that your OS uses. Otherwise, using mostly centos and redhat, your alias syntax looks already correct to me. Therefore it ...



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