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Actually od can display both hex/oct/dec and printable chars: $ od -Ax -tx1z /bin/sh | head -n2 000000 7f 45 4c 46 02 01 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 >.ELF............< 000010 03 00 3e 00 01 00 00 00 32 4e 00 00 00 00 00 00 >..>.....2N......< Main difference, I gues, is only historical. Also some versions hd can color output.


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No -9 in the snapshots, look here: http://snapshot.debian.org/binary/linux-headers-2.6.35-trunk-all-armel/


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A command line tools supporting such actions is find: Examples find /path -iname '*.ext' # search for extension (don't forget the quotes) find /path -mtime n # search for last modified `n*24h` ago find /path -atime n # search for last accessed `n*24h` ago find /path -newer ref # newer than ref find /path -size +100M # larger than 100MB ...


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I think, it's better to replace \n symbol to some other, and then work as usual: e.g. not-worked source code: cat alpha.txt | sed -e 's/a test\nPlease do not/not a test\nBe/' can be changed to: cat alpha.txt | tr '\n' '\r' | sed -e 's/a test\rPlease do not/not a test\rBe/' | tr '\r' '\n' If somebody don't know, \n is unix line ending, \r\n - windows, ...



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