Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The documented way to create the mysql account is: groupadd mysql useradd -r -g mysql mysql Add the -m option if you want that account to be used as a login account, which looks to be the case. If you have full sudo access, you can grant sudo rights to that use with using sudo visudo and adding a line similar the one starting with your username and ...


1

I think what you're really looking for is this Q&A from the Wine HQ forums titled: [FAQ] [RFC] How can multiple users share an installed Wine application. === How can multiple users share an installed Wine application? === Wine is a per-user app; every user has their own Wine Registry, with the list of installed apps for that user. So one ...


7

You can't have several users with the same UID. If they have the same UID, then they're the same user. What you have is multiple entries in the user database for the same user. That's possible in all unix variants I've seen. The user name determines which entry is used and thus which password, home directory and shell applies at login time. The first entry ...


1

Use chage -l to see a decoded interpretation of the aging information. The user name is expected as the argument. If you are interrogating your own account, no special privileges are requried. Otherwise use sudo chage -l someaccount. When an account is locked, the password field of /etc/shadow will begin with an exclamation point. The remaining ...


3

According to the "Fixing a Lockout" instructions in the cPanel docs, you can use WHM to run the following script: /scripts2/doautofixer?autofix=disable_cphulkd


0

You can achieve it using the below command. Assuming the new user created is user1, you can give the below command to give access to this user access to the home directories of the other users. setfacl -R -m user:user1:rwx /home/ However, it is strongly not recommended. You can find this answer for my question here. We have implemented a similar ...


0

This is not exclusive to tmux, but right now it's what I'm using: You can use script -f /path/to/some/file to write a terminal session to a file. The -f option updates the file while you tipe. Someone else (with only read permissions to the file, if you want) can do tail -f to see the file, your terminal session. The -f option makes tail output whatever ...


3

As already mentioned in the comments, since memory and CPU usage are negligible as you said, idle users won't hurt anyone. If you still want to get rid of them, you could automatically hunt down idle users and kick them off, either by e.g. a shell script you call in regular intervals via cron, or by setting ClientAliveInterval 1800 ClientAliveCountMax 0 ...


5

Put some text into the file ~/.plan and try finger again: $ finger yeti Login: yeti Name: yeti Directory: /arpa/tz/y/yeti Shell: /bin/ksh On since Wed Apr 2 15:24 (UTC) on pts/149 Mail last read Mon Mar 31 11:08 2014 (UTC) No Plan. $ echo Mwhuaaaaahahahahahahahahahaaaa... > ...


-1

try this: useradd {user} || echo "User already exists." or even this: useradd {user} || true


1

But I have another question. This command create /home directory but It is empty. Is some command to initialize /home for new user? The solution to the second question will also solve the first one. Your new user doesn't have all the default configuration files in it's home directory and therefore the new shell doesn't show a fancy prompt, etc... The ...


0

You are switching for a normal user and this user doesn't have a $PS1 set but in my opnion you add this user using useradd command in Debian Based that by default the shell wen you use useradd is sh , so you can try: chsh -s /bin/bash userName this command will change the shell for userName to /bin/bash. and than try again switch for that user. if you ...


0

You are switching from one normal user (you) to another normal user, say joe, right? The following is your shell prompt, defined in the environment variable PS1: user@user directory $ After switching to joe, you see joe's shell prompt. And he did not configure to show anything fancy in the prompt, so only the default prompt is shown, which looks just ...


3

The reason (the only reason, as far as I know) to put users in a group of their own is to make umask 002 or umask 007 a sensible default. The umask is a mask for the default permissions of newly created files. The meaning of the digits are the same as in chmod; the first digit is for the user, the second for the group, and the third for others. If a bit is ...


1

It was customary to add all users to group users, but that makes sharing files in a controlled way awkward (open up group permissions, everybody has access). As today a process can belong to a lot of groups at the time, just close access by giving each user her own group, and share files by adding explicit groups for this. Or (if available) use ACLs.


12

Use su: su - alice sudo vim /etc/hosts From man su: The su command is used to become another user during a login session. Invoked without a username, su defaults to becoming the superuser. The optional argument - may be used to provide an environment similar to what the user would expect had the user logged in directly. For more ...


0

To my knowledge the Switch users functionality in Xfce does not support slim. Try a different DM like lightdm.


17

First off, the respective man page snippets highlight the differences between the two commands and give some indication of what is going on. For adduser: adduser and addgroup add users and groups to the system according to command line options and configuration information in /etc/adduser.conf. They are friendlier front ends to the low level ...



Top 50 recent answers are included