Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

The nobody user is a pseudo user in many Unixes and Linux distributions. According to the Linux Standard Base, the nobody user and its group are an optional mnemonic user and group. That user is meant to represent the user with the least permissions on the system. In the best case that user and its group are not assigned to any file or directory (as owner). ...


1

The user who can login as nobody can change these files, but normally the system is setup so this is not possible. On my debian based system the entry in the /etc/password file is: nobody:x:65534:65534:nobody:/nonexistent:/usr/sbin/nologin and /usr/sbin/nologin gives: This account is currently not available. You can only change this as user root, as ...


1

You are basically asking two separate questions. How to set permissions on your local system to mirror the production one? You need to know the server configuration - in this case it includes configuration of the http daemon (httpd aka Apache in this case) - usually found in /etc/httpd or /etc/apache). You also need to know with what credentials daemon ...


0

I had success with the update-passwd command after I manually edited the /etc/passwd file on Debian-based systems (e.g. Ubuntu). I know this is NOT the intended use of this command, but it works for this purpose, too. See its man page for more deatails: http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/precise/man8/update-passwd.8.html On Red Hat / CentOS based systems I ...


0

It would depend on your login manager. It's probably configured for automatic login. Just remember that, to actually change something significant, you'd have to type your password(sudo). Check the config files. Alternatively, you could set a password at boot-time(obviously through the bios could work as well) which would require a password after grub. Or ...


0

You can change it; see How do I change my username? on AskUbuntu. Those instructions worked well for me. To preserve your configuration, just make a symlink for your old home directory as described in the answers to that question.


1

You've asked a few questions. Why does installing transmission create a new user? For security. Basically, by running Transmission as its own user, its ability to touch other users' data on the system (such as your user) is greatly limited. If there is a security flaw in Transmission, a cracker who exploited it would find it much more difficult, if not ...


0

I think the OP is concerned about why did not the useradd command create the home directory. The CREATE_HOME directive in the /etc/login.defs file decides whether the useradd command should create the home directory by default (without having to use the -m option) or not. If it is commented out or set to NO, only then you will have to explicity use the -m ...


2

As with all commands, read the man page if they show a undesired behavior. Here man useradd says: -m, --create-home Create the user's home directory if it does not exist. The files and directories contained in the skeleton directory (which can be defined with the -k option) will be copied to the home directory. By default, ...


3

Just follow the command below to resolve your case execute this command to add directory mkdir -p /home/connectweb in case of need copy files from /etc/skel directory to have .bashrc and so on files change ownership of this directory chown -R connectweb:connectweb /home/connectweb if you want to increase a little bit the security change the permissions ...


3

What you want are ssh-key pairs, these create 'trusted networks' that allow for password-less authentication: On your client (server1): [user@server1]# ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 2048 Generating public/private rsa key pair. Enter file in which to save the key (/root/.ssh/id_rsa): # Hit Enter Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): # Hit Enter Enter same ...


0

Finally I finished myself This is the answer useradd -m -d /home/testuser/ -s /bin/bash -G sudo testuser


1

Would the correct approach here be to change the "owner" of the files from what I assume is root to my FTP user? Yes. As root, run chown -R yourftpuser:yourftpgroup /path/to/tree. Your permissions will be fine for FTP at that point. All files will be owned by the FTP user, who has write access┬╣. In future, you can avoid this by cloning as the user you ...


1

useradd -m LOGIN creates the user's home directory


1

The useradd program has been deprecated in favor of adduser. From man useradd: useradd is a low level utility for adding users. On Debian, administrators should usually use adduser(8) instead. adduser is a friendlier frontend to useradd and will do things like create user directories by default. When you run it with only a username as an argument, ...


3

nothing is guaranteed. root - is usually on linux/unix systems, but - i saw systems where uid=0 was used by "admin". Usually - there are users like root, nobody, daemon, bin, sys. www-data is on debian/ubuntu, but for example on redhat/centos/fedora/pld there is apache user instead. Recomendations/fixed uids for users other than root are only within ...



Top 50 recent answers are included