New answers tagged

7

Yes. The normal/unprivileged user can write to /tmp and /var/tmp, for legitimate reasons. Also, if the user or group permissions of a given file/directory includes those of the user, he or she can write to those files or directories as well. Having said that, providing write capability to operating system files and directories to a normal user, is shooting ...


5

/tmp and possibly /var/tmp are writtable to any users.


0

I suggest the following liks http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-audit_filter/ www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/sg246020.pdf (Redbook) Also you can configuring the IBM The Audit Subsystem. https://www.netiq.com/documentation/change-guardian/changeguardianuserguide/data/b13v6jsc.html You could also specify their history file in the ...


1

In Unix, to do even the most basic stuff, a user needs access to sundry resources (executables, libraries, configuration files, manual pages, examples, ...). Even what is considered "normal commands" like cp(1), ls(1), are regular programs run by the user, who will need to be able to access them. Users need access to much of the system, that can't be cut off ...


2

It is much more difficult to prevent some particular access than to by default block all access and add specific exceptions for each kind of access. There is even a catchy term for this principle. Therefore, ensure that the commands that can be run via sudo are explicitly specified so that the user can never become root using it. After this has been done you ...


0

short answer : you can't. long answer: HOME dir is set in /etc/passwd, 6th field. It is read upon loggin, your shell is started with this home dir. The proper way to change home dir for joe is : have joe log off. use usermod -d /new/home joe to change home dir for subsequent session. Once session is run, you must do two things: edit $HOME to change ...


2

The usermod command wont work if you're logged in with the user you are trying to make changes on. From the manual page on usermod it says: CAVEATS usermod will not allow you to change the name of a user who is logged in. You must make certain that the named user is not executing any processes when this command is being executed if the user's ...


1

You need to edit the /etc/passwd file to change home directory of users that are currently logged in. Edit the /etc/passwd with sudo vipw and change home directory of the user. vipw highly recommended other than vim or other editors since vipw will set lock to prevent any data corruption.


0

What you have works on my system. user:~$ groups test; test : test user:~$ groups user adm cdrom sudo dip www-data plugdev lpadmin sambashare davfs2 wireshark user:~$ sudo usermod -a -G $(id -Gn | tr " " ",") test user:~$ groups test test : test adm cdrom sudo dip www-data plugdev lpadmin user sambashare davfs2 wireshark


0

for i in /etc /usr /var; do (find $i -type f -printf "$i -> %u:%g\n" 2> /dev/null) | sort | uniq -c; done output: 2 /etc -> root:dip 1 /etc -> root:fuse 7 /etc -> root:lp 2441 /etc -> root:root 2 /etc -> root:shadow ... I loop through the directories you wanted (/etc, /usr, and var). I use the find command to ...


2

find . -type f -printf %u:%g\\n | awk '{usergroup[$0]++}; END {for(key in usergroup) printf "%-20s %d\n",key,usergroup[key]}' hl:hauke 401 hl:1003 10 root:root 1 find prints for every file a line of the kind username:groupname. awk uses an associative array to count the occurrences. For every line the variable with the ...


2

You could get the username from the UID, passing that to passwd. passwd $(id -nu $UID)


-1

Use command newgrp to switch to apache's supplementary group updaters.


2

You have a way simpler solution, just run: su -s /bin/bash nobody (replace /bin/bash with the shell of your choice). The This account is currently not available. error is due to the fact that nobody user default shell is /usr/sbin/nologin, su -s force the system to use another shell.


0

There is an option in sshd config file with path /etc/ssh/sshd.config. Find PermitEmptyPasswords in the file and change it to yes, and you can have user without login passwords, I don't think that will be good practice though . chnage this PermitEmptyPasswords no to PermitEmptyPasswords yes


0

I do not think you can. Linux is based on user separation, and users need a password to login most display managers (or other methods like SSH). I think GDM will allow passwordless logins (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=123116) but the users still need a password, and you will still have to enter it for some things (like keyring). You might be ...


1

You can remove their passwords since you want them to autologin. On terminal sudo passwd user1 -d for all three of them. They will not have any password. Also if your users has sudo privileges I assume they do then you need to user1 ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL on sudoers file for three users



Top 50 recent answers are included