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1

Based on the definition of auid from this SuSE page, titled: Understanding the Audit Logs and Generating Reports: auid The audit ID. A process is given an audit ID on user login. This ID is then handed down to any child process started by the initial process of the user. Even if the user changes his identity (for example, becomes root), the ...


1

I tested this in a virtual machine context: the SSH server is Cygwin (also VM host); the client is Arch Linux SSH (also VM guest). I used the following script. I am not chrooting so I don't need to copy any binaries in the shared folder, only to copy the public key. Anyway I think that, using the internal-sftp (not SSH), binary requirements should be ...


0

You could probably (ab)use the AuthorizedKeysCommand option for fetching public keys from all home directories, although that seems a bit impractical. As for chrooting, read attentively on ChrootDirectory there is lots of things you would need inside of the chroot for interactive sessions.


1

I was experimenting with a ubuntu machine for trying to find a solution for you. When you create a user and delete it and then create a user again, the second user takes the uid of the deleted user so it s hard to find the amount of users by this technic. I suppose there is no command for your willing actions. I think you re going to find your answer by ...


2

If it would work, you should probably have: ChrootDirectory /home/jon the home dir of pub in /etc/passwd just set to /pub. /home/jon must be owned by root and writable only by root. You also need a working root dir with all you need in /home/jon, such as bin (for the shell), lib (shared libs), etc (passwd for uid-to-name conversion) and so on. It is ...


0

The --disabled-password option will not set a password, meaning no password is legal, but login is still possible (for example with SSH RSA keys). To create an user without a password, use passwd -d $username after the user is created to make the password empty. Note not all systems allow users with empty password to log in.


0

Here is some more info and potential problems when loging in via GUI or something else. If the home directory of a user does not exist, or the user has no permission to access it, login via GUI tends to fail; while login via su or ssh succeeds, complaining cannot chdir to home directory. If the login shell of a user does not exist, or the user has no ...


1

Yea the new users can log in via SSH but I got it sorted - the new users did not have access to their own home DIR's. Once I ran chown and chgrp to grant them access, they were able to log in from the GUI. problem solved. thanks!


2

like this? $ sudo adduser --ingroup sudo foo this will create user foo and add them to the sudo group which should already be in the sudoers file. if you need more fine-grained control about what goes into the sudoers file and are not afraid of interactivity (and vi!), just do: $ sudo adduser foo $ sudo visudo


4

The reason is very likely due to the ftp account having /bin/false or similar as its default shell: $ getent passwd ftp ftp:x:116:127:ftp daemon,,,:/srv/ftp:/bin/false It is probably not a good idea in term of security but should you want to set the user shell to something valid, you can use chsh, eg: # chsh ftp /bin/bash chsh ftp Changing the login ...


5

It means that the password is locked. Tools, such as usermod -L add a ! to the password to invalidate it. usermod -U removes the !. From man 5 shadow If the password field contains some string that is not a valid result of crypt(3), for instance ! or *, the user will not be able to use a unix password to log in (but the user may log in the system by ...


3

Since the release of 0.9 Docker has dropped LXC and uses its own execution environment, libcontainer. Your question's a bit old but I guess my answer still applies the version you are using. Quick Answer: To understand the permissions of volumes, you can take the analogy of mount --bind Host-Dir Container-Dir. So to fulfill your requirement you can use any ...


1

If you delete the user account, then the user no longer exists. It's perfectly normal that the user ID then gets reused: there is nothing to distinguish this user ID from any other unused user ID. If the account still owns files, the account still exists, so you need to keep it around. Don't delete the entry in the user database, mark it as disabled. On ...


4

Essentially, it's part of a strategy to mitigate some security concerns while allowing users a simple way to collaborate with less permission hassles. Linux systems have what's called a umask, which dictates file and directory permissions assigned on creation. By default, this umask is usually 022 which creates files with 644 permissions (owner read/write, ...


5

The possible way to add an user is more or less similar to what I had put in the question. I got this approach from here. To create a new account manually, follow these steps: Edit /etc/passwd with vipw and add a new line for the new account. Be careful with the syntax. Do not edit directly with an editor. vipw locks the file, so that other commands won't ...


0

unix doesn't work with user/group, it work with uid/gid, you change uid/gid, please fix new uid/gui with your home directory: for example: chown 1002.1002 yourdir -R


4

All groups are active at all times. You can access any file that any of your groups can access. But when you create a new file/process it is created using your primary group, unless setgid or ACL defaults are in use.


1

Q1: So the question is what is the fundamental reason on why the designers chose to have this concept of a single active group even though allowing the user to have more than one supplementary groups? The original primary purpose of groups in Unix was to allow for sharing of access to files on disks. Within this use case you'd typically be accessing ...


3

One reason: when one creates a file, it can be only in one group, and this group is not specified during the file creation. So, there must be a notion of single active group.



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