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0

Why doesn't it work? The error messages /usr/lib/passmgmt: Password file(s) busy. Try again later /usr/lib/passmgmt: Password file(s) busy. Try again later /usr/lib/passmgmt: Password file(s) busy. Try again later likely mean you don't have permission to create a file in /etc. The only source of that error message that I can find is in the passmgmt ...


0

Now I could putty to the VM. The VM is hosted on VMware and IP addresses is supplied through DCHP. After logging into the machine I could no see the IP address. Thus gave ifdown eth0 ifup eth0 . Then tried putty again and that time it first time asked Yes/No question on finger print as I configured ssh key for root user. Then tried logging in as sudo user ...


3

Recent versions of Mac OS X have what's known as System Integrity Protection, aka "SIP", aka "Rootless". It basically makes parts of the file system read-only to everybody, including root. You may have bumped into that. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_Integrity_Protection The intent is to prevent mistakes and malware from modifying your base operating ...


0

add a guestuser option to the ftpaccess file in the /etc directory


2

Yes, ACL:s allow freely setting different rights to different users or groups. IIRC the usual group permissions limit the set of permissions that groups and users can have through ACL:s (shown as mask in getfacl), but setfacl should deal with that if you add permissions. But in some cases you need to ask if the set of permissions makes any sense. I have ...


16

Traditional unix permissions only allow user, group, other permissions as you've found. These can result in some awkward combination of groups needing to be created... So a new form of ACL (Access Control Lists) were tacked on. This allows you to specify multiple users and multiple groups with different permissions. These are set with the setfacl command ...


0

Your server might be setup to disallow password authentication, e.g., requiring Kerberos (not well supported by PuTTY), or a private key. For the former, the KerberosOrLocalPasswd and UsePAM might be useful. PuTTY works (except when Kerberos is intruding) well enough with a private key. For reference: sshd_config - OpenSSH SSH daemon configuration file ...


1

There is no $HOME defined in /etc/rc.local so when syncthing resolves its configuration location $HOME/.config/syncthing it's finding /.config/syncthing. I suspect that this contains details for your local user, thom, whereas when $HOME=root, /root/.config/syncthing contains details for root. Also, you don't need sudo when you're already root (as in /etc/rc....


3

The www-data user is evidently configured with /sbin/nologin (or equivalent) as its shell, and thus the system will not allow you to login to that account. sudo lets you run a command as any user on the system, not just root. To clone the repo, you just need to sudo -u www-data git clone ... If you really need shell access as that user, sudo -u www-data ...


2

The best and easiest thing you can do is to add groups to each of your users, i.e. modifying your users! This task can be done by using usermod command. Read more here. Be aware that -g option is for user's new initial group (i.e. Primary) while -G option is a list of supplementary groups which the user can be also a member of. You can get more information ...


0

The best option is use Sudo rulles Safe passwords in text file is in top 10 wrong pratice IT. but if you want use you must rememebr parwd is not read from stdin but ftom tty so you can use expect(*1) but this is still wrong way . Beter option is use sudo or sshkey you can login to ssh account using public key to localhost address . do not try su - ...


0

Typically programs like su require passwords to be entered on the terminal and can't be bypassed. The root user doesn't need to enter a password to switch to another, so it's common to see solutions like sudo su user. However we might be able to cheat. If you have the expect command on your system then we can fake typing the password #!/usr/bin/expect -f ...


0

lxde-logout is just a wrapper to lxsession-logout. It's a simple script % cat /usr/bin/lxde-logout #!/bin/sh lxsession-logout --banner "/usr/share/lxde/images/logout-banner.png" --side=top http://forum.lxde.org/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1731 claims you can just send a SIGTERM to lxsession and the PID should be in $_LXSESSION_PID. So kill -TERM $...


3

If we look at the source for (a version of) i3lock, we can see it determines the user whose password is required by doing getuid(). So setting the environment variable USER has no effect, and you will need to su or sudo as that user instead.


0

The question nearly gives it away, if you're familiar with pipes: To do this, note the who command will show each user who is logged in along with identification of their computer. You can feed this information to the grep command, to only display strings that contain the "kwantlen.ca". You can then further feed this output to the wc command, ...


1

First, try changing AllowUser userName in the /etc/sshd_config file on your WD My Book to AllowUsers root admin userName to see if that resolves the issue. Also, check the contents of /etc/passwd and make sure that the entry for userName doesn't include /user/sbin/nologin, but instead something like /bin/bash. For instance, the entry for the admin account ...


2

By saying you're in user2's shell you imply you've been logged in as user2, the command whoami or echo $LOGNAME will let you know the same. Whatever commands you are firing in the terminal are considered to be fired by the logged-in user, except for those through sudo. The coloumn names in an output of ls is as below, for you reference. The Fourth field is ...


5

No, vim is not set user id (that is, it will not change effective userid). running a command line from vim will give you a shell (that is the word) as user2. By the way, to edit the file you must either be user user3 belong to group user2, merely being user2 is not enough. There used to be a bug in redhat 4.x (or still is) when running visudo, which ...


0

Did it! You were right: I needed to change file permissions, for the directories and the qcow2 file, the correct user was qemu and the group wheel. Thank you!


3

Yes Yes Yes It depends, complex program (database, tomcat like web server) do, smaller (gif generator) don't. It depends, if no set user id, program will run as clicking user. root mostly, some as www (if you have a web server), some as bin, mail.


3

It looks like that's actually the username. Try checking the passwd file, and you might find that somebody tried to comment out a line: grep owner /etc/passwd If you find that there is a line starting with #, then if there is another line which doesn't have it, you may want to remove the line with the #. Otherwise, you may just want to remove the #. That ...


1

You can use usermod or edit the group file directly # usermod -a G ${group} ${user} # vi /etc/group ... wheel:x:10:root,user1,user2 ... Just remember group changes do not always propagate to active sessions. If you are changing your own user logout and then log back in.


2

Just figured out the problem. When you giving privileges from other then the root user, then you need to specify user at the sudo command. See below example: This command run by cat and it works. sudo -u dog vim /home/dog/test.txt


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As root edit /etc/sudoers and place the following line: youruser ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL after # Allow members of group sudo to execute any command %sudo ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL In this way you will be capable to execute all commands that require sudo privileges passwordless. In order to use sudo and be prompted for a password you need to remove ...



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