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16

Traditional unix permissions only allow user, group, other permissions as you've found. These can result in some awkward combination of groups needing to be created... So a new form of ACL (Access Control Lists) were tacked on. This allows you to specify multiple users and multiple groups with different permissions. These are set with the setfacl command ...


3

The www-data user is evidently configured with /sbin/nologin (or equivalent) as its shell, and thus the system will not allow you to login to that account. sudo lets you run a command as any user on the system, not just root. To clone the repo, you just need to sudo -u www-data git clone ... If you really need shell access as that user, sudo -u www-data ...


2

Recent versions of Mac OS X have what's known as System Integrity Protection, aka "SIP", aka "Rootless". It basically makes parts of the file system read-only to everybody, including root. You may have bumped into that. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_Integrity_Protection The intent is to prevent mistakes and malware from modifying your base operating ...


2

Yes, ACL:s allow freely setting different rights to different users or groups. IIRC the usual group permissions limit the set of permissions that groups and users can have through ACL:s (shown as mask in getfacl), but setfacl should deal with that if you add permissions. But in some cases you need to ask if the set of permissions makes any sense. I have ...


2

The best and easiest thing you can do is to add groups to each of your users, i.e. modifying your users! This task can be done by using usermod command. Read more here. Be aware that -g option is for user's new initial group (i.e. Primary) while -G option is a list of supplementary groups which the user can be also a member of. You can get more information ...


1

There is no $HOME defined in /etc/rc.local so when syncthing resolves its configuration location $HOME/.config/syncthing it's finding /.config/syncthing. I suspect that this contains details for your local user, thom, whereas when $HOME=root, /root/.config/syncthing contains details for root. Also, you don't need sudo when you're already root (as in /etc/rc....



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