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6

Use the who comand. It lists all logged-in users. It's not just SSH users, it will also list users on the console and directly-connected terminals (if you have any). For SSH users, it will show where they're connected from.


5

LDAP is a directory service (a type of database) along with a protocol that describes what information is stored, how to search it, etc. All kinds of things can be stored there, but in this case it'd be Unix user and group info. Very loosely, an alternative to /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow, /etc/group, and /etc/gshadow. Or to NIS. NSS is glibc's name service ...


4

You want to run: who -T | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 1-2 | sort -u Explanation: who -T shows all users and their writeable status ('+' -> you can write to them) tr -s ' ' collapses multiple spaces in who's output cut -d ' ' -f 1-2 only take the first two fields (username + writeable status) sort -u sorts the list and shows only unique occurrences (in ...


3

It is there for an obvious reason. To quote from this answer, When you are creating an account to run a daemon, service, or other system software, rather than an account for interactive use. Technically, it makes no difference, but in the real world it turns out there are long term benefits in keeping user and software accounts in separate ...


2

sftp -o Port:8777 'user@domain.com'@domain.com This would also work, although its really quite poor form for them to provision users with this type of name.


1

On Ubuntu you should be using adduser instead of useradd (see man useradd). The Ubuntu useradd has e.g. no -n option. adduser creates a new group user, with the users name, as the default group: adduser --no-create-home --home "/home/$homedir" "$uname" You will be prompted for a password and GECOS info by the program. If prompting is not what you want ...


1

who command will give you a simple info (user, pseudoterminal, session start date, host ip) of the users logged in. user pts/0 2014-10-30 16:00:00 (1.1.1.1) w command will give you a little more detailed info of the users. USER TTY FROM LOGIN@ IDLE JCPU PCPU WHAT user pts/0 1.1.1.1 16:17 0.00s 0.30s 0.02s sshd: user ...


1

Well, I can think of two counter-points to the idea of separate accounts. One, there is one big flaw with with classic unix groups vs. a common shared tree of files, and that is that each user and each script they run needs to have a umask that keep files and directories group-writable, and you need to apply the group-sticky bit to all directories. In ...


1

I just had the same return when installing deluged on arch, I typed: systemctl start deluged I tried with sudo and it worked fine. Seems to be a group permissions issue. All I did was enable permissions for my user account and then typed: sudo systemctl start deluged worked like a charm... hope this helps!


1

One problem with the chown command (but that's actually down to the chown() system call) is that it strips the setuid and setgid bits in the permissions as a security measure. It also doesn't cover ACLs. To work around that, an approach can be to use rsync on a directory over itself in update mode and with the --usermap option: $ ls -ln total 6732 ...


1

I'm having the same problem using Raspbian. After adding a user named "bill", raspbian failed to create the user's home directory. Although I had created the user account using "useradd bill && passwd bill", and although the /etc/passwd file contained the expected path to /home/bill as the home directory, the actual path "/home/bill" was never ...



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