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Start with creating a user: useradd -m -d /home/username -s /bin/bash username Create a key pair from the client which you will use to ssh from: ssh-keygen -t dsa Copy the public key /home/username/.ssh/id_dsa.pub onto the RedHat host into /home/username/.ssh/authorized_keys Set correct permissions on the files on the RedHat host: chown -R ...


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Usually just the name of the package or program, so hadoop in this case. Daemons are usually added as a system account using useradd -r, which gives them a userid lower than human users (on my system, system accounts start at 100, human users start at 1000). Looking at the user names for system accounts in /etc/passwd seems to confirm the lack of any ...


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There are as many opinions as there are people. I think the best way to create tomcat user to do as follows: # useradd -r -s /sbin/nologin tomcat # chown -R tomcat: /usr/local/tomcat It means, you will create system account. Info from man useradd: System users will be created with no aging information in /etc/shadow, and their numeric identifiers are ...


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You could use: usermod --lock <username> From the man page: Lock a user's password. This puts a '!' in front of the encrypted password, effectively disabling the password. You can't use this option with -p or -U. Note: if you wish to lock the account (not only access with a password), you should also set the EXPIRE_DATE to 1.


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Make sure your user and root have passwords; as root, run: passwd user passwd (replacing user as appropriate). Once you've done that, you can replace console::respawn:/bin/sh -l which starts a shell directly, with console::respawn:/bin/login if you have /bin/login on your system. Traditionally you'd use getty to manage the serial connection ...


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Look at the first line in /etc/shadow: it seems that one field is missing



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