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25

Ultimately, it was an arbitrary choice made by the creators of Unix over four decades ago now. They could have chosen to make things case-insensitive like the creators of MS-DOS did a decade later, but that has its disadvantages, too. It's too deeply embedded in *ix culture to change now. The case sensitive filesystem issue brought up by eppesuig is only ...


10

This is entirely up to you but most programs do someting like this program --help Usage: program [<options>][<arguments> ...] Options: --help show this message, then exit --something after some spaces for alignment, an explenation follows. You should check out getopt which most programs (this is also available in programming ...


9

Linux Mint is, for me, the most user-friendly Linux Distribution, the UI is almost the same as Windows, on the contrary of Ubuntu's Unity. Plus, for me, it's much more stable and "better", in my opinion than Ubuntu. You may also want to take a look at Mageia, a fork of Mandriva, the old Mandrake Linux.


8

Case sensitive is part of the POSIX way of handling command and argument it has nothing to do with the meaning. It's a very good thing that Status and status are not the same because the file system which kind of a base in the system is case sensitive (because of POSIX rules). It's usually a good pratice to keep the same behavior in your whole system. ...


8

is there any reason to be case-sensitive? It leaves a much bigger namespace available. For example, a later version of git could implement uppercase variations on command names, or allow the user to define macros/aliases, as with the shell, where you can define your own MV, CP, etc. without having to redefine mv, cp, etc.


7

From my experience of looking at new, untaught users: their main problems are with understanding and having a grasp on what is what on the now common Windows/KDE/Xfce/IceWM-like desktop -- they get confused by the elements of the DE and afraid. After thinking this over, I arrived at the conclusion that a Nextstep/WindowMaker/(perhaps Gnome 3)-like desktop ...


6

http://www.gnome.org/getting-gnome/ Fedora Just install or try it live to use GNOME 3. openSUSE GNOME 3.2 is the default desktop environment of openSUSE 12.1. Mageia GNOME 3 will be part of Mageia 2. Install ‘task-gnome’ after installing Mageia. Arch Linux Arch Linux has GNOME 3 in the extra repository. Ubuntu ...


6

A normal, "modeless" editor is like Notepad on Windows: there is only one mode, where you input text. Vi, and it's successor Vim, are modal: there are two primary modes1, insert mode where you type text into the editor and it is committed to the document, and normal mode where you enter arguments via the keyboard that perform a variety of functions, ...


6

Openbox and Window Maker are great suggestions. You may also have luck with related projects and derivatives; I had a good experience with Fluxbox on Crunchbang (Ubuntu-based). Lubuntu, with the LXDE desktop environment is very lightweight while providing a bit more out-of-the-box infrastructure than going without any desktop environment. Though, I've ...


6

Press o to change the options. In the very first preference “User mode”, select “Advanced” (“Novice” has the huge help, “Intermediate” has a one-line help, and “Advanced” shows the selected URL in the modeline). Check the “Save options to disk” box then follow the “Accept” link at the top. The corresponding setting in ~/.lynxrc is user_mode=ADVANCED ...


5

Look at it from another perspective. The computer has no knowledge of language or letters, what it sees are numbers that are then mapped to characters. While I (the letter I) and | (the pipe) may look very similar to you, they are completely different to the computer. To illustrate, have a look at the table below. You will see that there is no ...


5

The technical systems that I use and respect are almost exclusively case-sensitive: be it OS or programming language or anything else. The exceptions I could think of right now is the HTML tags and some implementations of SQL, and the Ada programming language. Even in those cases, I think there are strong tendencies to actually write HTML tags in ...


4

Your primary concern will be finding a distro which runs happily in 256Mb - its not a lot of memory these days. IMHO (and personally I prefer KDE) for non-techies, I'd favour a Gnome 3 based desktop (although an icewm/xfce will fit better into the available memory). I'd also suggest having a look at the distros targeting netbooks - the program selection is ...


4

I am not a fan of overriding built-in commands, but in my .bashrc (part of Tilde, my "dot files") I explicitly do this: alias rm='rm -i'; This makes rm ask for permission before deleting. It has saved me a few times. You can always override with rm -f.


4

getopt vs getopts seems to be a religious issue. As for the arguments against getopt in the Bash FAQ: "getopt cannot handle empty arguments strings" seems to refer to a known issue with optional arguments, which it looks like getopts doesn't support at all (at least from reading help getopts for Bash 4.2.24). From man getopt: getopt(3) can parse long ...


4

To disable the login manager permanently on Ubuntu you can do the following: sudo sh -c "echo 'manual' > /etc/init/lightdm.override" To start the login manager manually when needed you would do: sudo service lightdm start To stop it manually: sudo service lightdm stop


3

In ls and du, the --help output is plain and simple hardcoded into the program. In scripting languages such as Python there may be an option parsing library that does it automatically for you. As for standards, the only thing I could find was this: http://www.gnu.org/prep/standards/html_node/_002d_002dhelp.html#g_t_002d_002dhelp or more specific to ls, ...


3

$ man evim NAME evim - easy Vim, edit a file with Vim and setup for modeless editing SYNOPSIS evim [options] [file ..] eview DESCRIPTION eVim starts Vim and sets options to make it behave like a modeless edi‐ tor. This is still Vim but used as a point-and-click editor. This feels a lot like using Notepad on ...


2

There's this getopts_long written as a POSIX shell function that you may embed inside your script. Note that the Linux getopt (from util-linux) works correctly when not in traditional mode and supports long options, but is probably not an option for you if you need to be portable to other Unices. Recent versions of ksh93 (getopts) and zsh (zparseopts) ...


2

It's no more or less strange than the fact that we have an upper and lower case alphabet to start with. If you look in /usr/bin, you'll notice a (very) few executables exploit capitalization. A case sensitive namespace is not just twice as big as an insensitive one -- the difference grows exponentially with word length. Eg, using 26 characters, there are ...


2

I'd recommend Ubuntu 10.04. It's the latest "long-term support" (LTS) release, which means that usually it'll be the most stable release available, the usability is very good, and it'll be supported until April 2013, plenty of time to get familiar with the interface before upgrading to get all the shiny new stuff. Ubuntu 11.10 is available, but after using ...


2

Debian GNU/Linux can be installed on different architectures, it's perfect for old computers. Probably Fedora, OpenSuse and Ubuntu are the best solutions for new users and for many reasons: - Large communities of users and developers: - Howto, docs, books, etc... - Package management system. (rpm, yast and deb) - Easy installation process. I think that ...


2

I share imz's view that what's more difficult for newcomers to the computers world is the Desktop. In that optic, I like KDE's "search and launch" desktop mode, see http://ychaouche.wikispot.org/LinuxForComputerIlletrates


2

There are several different graphical user environments available for Linux, such as the GNOME, KDE or Xfce desktop environments. Such desktop environments include a panel application, such as GNOME Panel or KDE Kicker. These applications provide a task bar and an application launcher (the equivalent of the Windows start button). The desktop environments ...


2

When writing a command line utility I create a usage() function that spits out information in that form, and when I add or change something in the getopt (or whatever) code I update the usage function to reflect this. Of course, the problem with that system is that if you are lazy, you can end up with a inaccurate usage message, but that is not such a hard ...


1

You might want to try Cream - A modern configuration of the powerful and famous Vim, Cream is for Microsoft Windows, GNU/Linux, and FreeBSD. Also, I'd encourage you to at least try out plain Vim (no plugins yet, but do make extensive use of the built-in :help) for at least a week. vimtutor is a great start; you don't need to memorize dozens of commands for ...


1

I'm looking to be able to customise the part of the os which the user interacts with (the application?), for instance the task bar (on windows), start button, desktop etc. as I have no interest in changing how to load files and process applications, but where do I start looking? I'm very particular about my desktop too. GNU/Linux has the potential to ...


1

Find the "natural-hpadding" line in (/usr/share/gnome-shell/theme/gnome-shell.css) and replace 12 px with the value you like: .panel-button { -natural-hpadding: 5px; -minimum-hpadding: 6px; font-weight: bold; color: #ccc; transition-duration: 100ms; } For more information and tips see: ...


1

You will have to build X on your own. Begin by reading this X.Org wiki entry. This guide is for developers who wish to build the X Window System from source. If your area of interest is limited to a single package, like a driver or an application, check with your O/S first for development facilities. As for a package manager, you will need to choose ...


1

If the problem is that they find LibreOffice too confusing, changing to a new distribution is not going to help with that. You users shouldn't care what distribution you use, it's the window manager and applications they interact with most. With your hardware constraints, going with a simple window manager would probably give the best experience. Something ...



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