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1

Argh and grumble. I should have paid better attention to the output of dmesg | grep ftdi. There was ftdi stuff in there, but I didn't recognize any of it. In particular one brltty was showing up. I should have googled it. At which point I would have discovered this is the "Braille Display" thing. So apparently, default out of the box sets up some braille ...


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If you want to know the driver for your internal USB : lspci| grep USB This will list you the USB devices like : 00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB xHCI Host Controller (rev 04) 00:1a.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host Controller #2 (rev 04) 00:1d.0 USB ...


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you can try dmesg | grep usb mine have the line: ohci_hcd: USB 1.1 'Open' Host Controller (OHCI) Driver


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I had the same issue on my ubuntu 14.04 machine. The problem might be the default usbhid driver prevents your driver to function properly. That may be the reason why the probe is not getting invoked on hotplug. Try removing usbhid module. Check for udev rules defined by your distro, that autoloads the default usbhid driver module on hotplug even if you ...


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It seems to me that the problem is your device. It might enumerate OK, but behaves unexpectedly when further communications are performed. Try using Wireshark with usbmon (eventually tshark if you don't have an X session). The ttyACM1 name is usually due to re-enumeration after a faulty communication.


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Well, I costumarily use bashmount to mount USB sticks. They will be mounted in /run/media/$(user name)/$(drive label or UUID). But if you are talking about an internal harddisk or partition in a local harddrive, the simplest way is: Create a directory of your preference, as /mnt/windows-partition Mount the desired partition, say /dev/sdn5, in that ...


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I can think of one solution: clone the laptop HDD to a USB. Change the BIOS settings in the Windows box to boot USB first and then you boot your Debian system on the Win computer like a USB. If the Windows partition is not encrypted, you will be able to mount it from your portable Debian system and can exchange files as you wish. You might need a USB with ...


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The issue with using USB in this manner is that USB is a Master-Slave protocol, and most computers only come with Master or Host capable USB ports. If you were to find a way to add a Slave (or Device) port to your laptop, then you could use the Mass Storage Gadget implementation found here to make your laptop show up as a mass storage device. If you can't ...


3

Both the laptop and the PC are USB hosts with female type A connectors. You cannot directly connect two USB hosts with a Male-Male cable. One of the device's would need to act as a peripheral, which wouldn't be supported by the USB chipset on the motherboard. Some devices support acting as a host or peripheral with USB on-the-go, but I don't think any ...


1

There are ways to connect devices using USB, such as http://www.linux-usb.org/usbnet/. This however simulates an ethernet network, which you are probably trying to avoid. I'm pretty sure it's not possible to connect a computer as a USB drive. Your best bet is probably the regular network way, or you can write the USB interconnect driver yourself.


1

I've run into a similar problem many times with a variety of USB devices. My general approach to start debugging these issues has been the following: Plug the device directly into the computer vs. into a USB hub that's connected into the computer. For whatever reason the daisy chaining of devices through a hub like this can cause problems (this isn't a ...


4

If you have a solid (W)LAN network connection, use a combination of tar and netcat (nc), it will be fast… (NOTE: requires netcat on both servers). On destination box: $ nc -l -p 2342 | tar -C /target/dir -xzf - On source box: $ tar -cz /source/dir | pv -b | nc Target_Box 2342


2

I use a usb2usb cable (there's basically a networking chip in the middle of the table) to rsync my netbook with my laptop. It gets up to about 20-30MBps for bigger files, with ext4 on both ends. If you want to transfer 50GB quickly, you'll probably be better off with an external HDD. In my experience, the speed then climbs up to 70-100MBps, which more than ...


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The fact that one machine is running Red Hat and the other Debian won't cause you any problems. For most intents and purposes, the differences between distributions are insignificant. Realistically, you have two options for your data transfer: Using a removable disk, connected using USB or eSATA or similar. Using the network. Once both machines can ...


2

You might be interested in an inexpensive, elegant and open hardware solution for emulating usb devices in development: The micropython board. (I have no affilation with this hardware). It is a small standalone board that runs python 3, and plugs into the usb where it can appear as, for example, a mouse HID, or keyboard HID. You just copy your python ...


1

You can use lsblk. lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 465,8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 285M 0 part /boot ├─sda2 8:2 0 1,9G 0 part [SWAP] ├─sda3 8:3 0 74,5G 0 part / └─sda4 8:4 0 389,1G 0 part /home sr0 11:0 1 1024M 0 rom Usualy usb devices are on sdb so lsblk sdb should give all usb ...


4

This answer checks the list of all attached block devices and iterates over them with udevadmin to check their respective ID_BUS. You can see all attached block devices in /sys/block. Here is the bash script from the linked answer that should let you know if it is a USB storage device: for device in /sys/block/* do if udevadm info --query=property ...


0

I ran into the same problem installing OpenBSD 5.7 on a Jetway barebones box (JBC375F3AW-2930-B, but this probably applies to most or all models). The fix was to go into the BIOS setup program, and on the "Advanced" screen, set the "OS Selection" item to "Android".


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There is no thing as default autostart from a removable device in the DEs I know. So the only malicious code executed would bugs in the filesystem (unlikely) and bugs in the applications used to open the files. I would search for known security problems in the programs used (like LibreOffice etc). Where to find these depends on the program and the ...



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