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The best solution for this, is to use dd like this dd if=/path/to/debian.iso of=/dev/sdc Is necessary to burn the image to the entire usb and not just the first partition, sdc, not sdc1.


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udev adds some environment variables to the partition node (leaf node) including partition entry flags for MBR table. Bootable partition should have ID_PART_ENTRY_FLAGS=0x80. Try this rule and you gonna see all environment variables (source: Pass ATTR{idVendor} as argument in udev script): KERNEL="sd[a-z][1-9]", RUN+="/bin/sh -c 'echo == >> ...


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I can not reply to damn's comment, but adding iommu=soft solved it for me too. I tried with the noapic nolapic options and wih the IOMMU fom the bios and all failed. Simply follow the same steps as described by slm but add iommu=soft on the start command line instead of noapic nolapic.


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Here you can find a similar problem solved. The main idea is to disable autosuspend in the usbcore, if I got it right. Try executing echo -1 >/sys/module/usbcore/parameters/autosuspend And reboot the system afterwards. This one helped the guy from ubuntu forum


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Plug your usb drive and use udevadm info -a -p /sys/block/sd* where * is your disk assigned number(sda1,sda3,sdb2,etc) Then wrote a udev rule like this KERNEL=="sd*", SUBSYSTEMS==" block", ATTRS{serial}=="**************", SYMLINK+="sdb%n" Of course edit this based on udevadm info Another good solution is to use DISK_UID or LABEL for mount,then ...


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You could also try to use the device by the USB address (i.e. controller/hub and device number), like so: ls -l /dev/bus/usb/0??/0?? You can find out the device number by using the lsusb command (try using it as root if you do not get all the information you need, albeit it usually tends to give you rather a lot of info), or use udevadm info ...


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I had a similar problem with a USB device using the pl2303 driver. Every now and again /dev/ttyUSB0 would vanish and /dev/ttyUSB1 would appear in its place. I solved it by running a cronjob every 15 minutes that did the following: if [ ! -c /dev/ttyUSB0 ] then echo `date` Device missing echo `date` Stopping zmconcopy `/usr/sbin/rczmconcopy stop ...


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For me (Debian sid/stretch), the udev $id attribute is empty when I plug in my USB device. It is $kernel that contains the necessary string to pass to USBHID's unbind. Here are the udev rules that I'm using: SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0000", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0000", MODE="0660", GROUP="plugdev" ATTRS{idVendor}=="0000", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0000", ...


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Is my guess right? Was VirtualBox indeed the culprit? All the clues do point in its direction. Probably so. If it was VBox, then how come it went on to hijack/reserve all USB devices in case of failure. I had only shared one USB device with it i.e. my USB wireless device. Is this a bug? Did my virtual machine have some virus, and it did something ...


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What you need to do is isolate the faulty component. It might be the operating system, but it also might be the USB cable, the USB hub, the USB port, and so on. Work your way through these steps; if you see a behavior change you've probably identified the responsible component. Try connecting the drive to a different port on the hub. Try connecting the ...


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Unmount the USB-drive and open up a new terminal. First get the device name with: sudo fdisk -l (Example: /dev/sdb1) Create new a mount point: sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb Then mount the USB-drive back on with ownership set to you: sudo mount -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb/ In the command above, the only thing you have to change is the ...


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Doing AT command communication from the command line with just plain shell operations is rather unreliable. I suggest that you try to use the program atinout which is specifically written to issue AT command from the command line: $ echo AT | atinout - /dev/ttyUSB0 - AT OK $


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You may want to check Easy2Boot. It's the most versatile and probably also best-documented tool for multiboot things. Specifically, it supports in particular Boot multiple linux ISOs each with separate persistence files [in addition, the author is also pretty helpful and really responsive even for in-depth questions] You could misuse that to reference ...


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A workaround is to check the current bus/device configuration for your device as it'll be portable too and I think the usb host controller allocates these numbers dynamically, here's using awk you can get the current bus and device lsusb | grep "045e:00cb" | tr -d ':'| awk '{print "Bus="$2 " Device="$4}' You use $2 and $4 in anyway for example : ls ...


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You can use this command to explore your device if connected to usb0: udevadm info -a -p $(udevadm info -q path -n /dev/ttyUSB0)


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It seems to be a problem with one of my USB controllers, plugging the devices in at the other controller resolved the issue.


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This accelerometer is in fact a "specialized" Arduino card, I didn't know ! So I just had to program it (with the Arduino software) and choose the example "DigitalReadSerial". So now I have $ tail -f /dev/ttyUSB0 ...


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To answer your question about out-of-the-box automounting: I wouldn't expect mounting to happen out-of-the-box without reference to your desktop environment (gnome). Debian 6 isn't that old. I've used LXDE from it or equivalent. The uselessly generic answer is that all desktop environments (DEs) will include a filemanager. Your filemanager will let you ...



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