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In the end the answer seems to be the following: The name comes from the remainder of the CD-ROM data (which in retrospect is embarrassingly obvious) You can't change it because it's not even meant to be used or even to be there - after all, you want to use the USB flash drive as a disk, not a CD-ROM. These two have different formats. Generally there is no ...


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try this command sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse exfat-utils


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Try googling recover lost partitions. One product is http://findandmount.com/. It says it can find filesystems even if the master boot record has lost partitions. I also remember using a product on http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/ to do the same thing. I just can't remember which product.


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A [probably not perfect] solution to this has been to hook onto the "systemd-remount-fs.service" systemd service, which is the remounting of the filesystem to read-write. This means the module will be loaded as early as possible, whilst still being loaded after the filesystem becomes readwrite. My sample systemd config file is as follows: [Unit] ...


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Logging shows that there's something going on with the MTP device detection. Try uninstalling libmtp if you can get away with it, or just comment out the udev rule in the relevant file.


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It's the volume label. That's the -L flag in mkfs.ext4 or, I think, the -n in mkfs.vfat, and so on. You can change it by passing a new label to it with e2label, or by killing it entirely with dd.


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you can install it normally ! just boot with your usb pluged in and chose it . if you want to install it while running your current os then install KVM and use the folowing cmds : cdRom=/path/to/kali.iso HDA=/dev/sd[x] # e.g /dev/sda (a hd not part like /dev/sda1) use lsblk kvm -cdrom "$cdRom" -hda "$HDA" -m 1024 -boot d you can use this ...


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An NTFS Easy2boot drive will boot multiple linux ISOs with persistence even if the linux being used does not support NTFS. You can even boot from an exFAT E2B drive to a linux distro that does not support exFAT. E2B creates a 4th partition on the E2B USB drive and 'maps' the ISO to that partition. When the ISO boots, it sees the 4th partition as having a ...


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You have to enable persistence in the boot options while booting from the USB drive. This way you will be able to save your settings and data into the USB drive. More information in the official Kali Linux page


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You can simply download any ISO Image from the website "www.android-x86.org" It's an Android distribution that works on a normal x86 Processors Like Android 4.4 http://sourceforge.net/projects/android-x86/files/Release%204.4/android-x86-4.4-r4.iso/download And Use The Tool Win32 Disk Imager to Write the ISO to the USB Drive ...


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Not enough credit to just comment. Sorry to post as an answer. I prefer to credit the original answer instead of cut&copy. Maybe this will help you. Superuser: How do I disable my built in Card Reader in Debian?


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I've just opened a bug report, with attached a working /etc/cups/printers.conf for recent versions of Debian: # Printer configuration file for CUPS v1.5.3 # Written by cupsd # DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE WHEN CUPSD IS RUNNING <Printer HP_LaserJet_1100> UUID urn:uuid:e2fd8b09-9e4e-3f96-79ac-f16946700768 Info Location MakeModel HP LaserJet 1100 - ...


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Under linux your devices have not meta-names like com1 or so. Your usb-adapter is added to the /dev-directory with a driver specific name. The most usb-uart adapter use the name /dev/ttyUSB* where the * is a number beginning at 0. The best way to get this name is to view the changes of kernel messages via dmesg before and after plugin of the adapter. You ...


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1) Yow to use photorec step by step http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec_Step_By_Step 2)You can select format using Space avaible format http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/File_Formats_Recovered_By_PhotoRec 3) You can add your own format http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Add_your_own_extension_to_PhotoRec 4)To access your files from a normal user ...


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You could have a look at the flashbench tool. I don't think that this kind of property is exported by the device reliably.


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To fix your drive you need to install testdisk sudo apt-get install testdisk to get more informations visit enter link description here


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You started creating a filesystem on your device and cancelled the operation. That left your device with no working file system so, of course, you can't use it. The good news is that, unless you've done something else you haven't told us about, it should be enough to just plug the device in again and running sudo mkfs.ntfs /dev/sdb1 This time, let it ...


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@siblynx, thank you for you reply. Mounting the media still fails. This is what I get with commands that you have proposed to me: # df -h Filesystem Size Used Available Use% Mounted on cramfs 3.4M 3.4M 0 100% /mnt/cramfs # # cat /proc/mounts rootfs / rootfs rw 0 0 cramfs ...


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u can use testdisk this tweak is avaible for all os for example to install it on Ubuntu sudo apt-get install testdisk to run sudo testdisk more informations: [http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk]


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Toss it. Even if you manage to fix it, you won't trust it with any important data anyway. It is not that a USB stick costs US$150 anymore (What I paid for my first one, I still have it. Just the neckstrap is no more. ;-)


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I guess you could try a few things: 1) Try to reboot your PC to see whether it could be due to a hotplug / coldplug problem 2) A bug on the kernel Linux affecting similar dongles has been identified, and patched, see bugzilla, so updating your kernel might be the best option for you.


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The answer is somewhat obvious according to the formulation of your question:) You can switch the modes with AT^PREFMODE=n command, where n is 2 for plain CDMA2000 (1x), 4 for EVDO and 8 for hybrid mode. The command may be executed in any VT102 terminal emulator, f. e., minicom (usually minicom -D /dev/ttySUB0) or even with echo.



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