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With regards to SDIO to USB adapters like something based off of a VUB300, under Linux, the bridge itself will Hot-plug USB and do the "right" things. The SDIO device, on the other hand...depends on whether the vendor (giving TI a nasty, nasty look right now...grrr...) did something non-standard and their drivers RELY on that off in the weeds behavior. The ...


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I've just built a script for that, it's not pretty but works for me. I tested this script on Arch Linux with this configurations: $ uname -a Linux 4.4.13-1-lts #1 SMP Wed Jun 8 16:44:31 CEST 2016 x86_64 GNU/Linux And my device name is /dev/sdb which is quite different from yours, I hope it will work for you as well. Also note that this script depends on ...


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eject /dev/sda will try and safely remove the device from the kernel and make it safe to remove. You can verify it's removed by looking on /dev to see if the partition entry has been removed (the base device may still show up). e.g. I just plugged in a USB stick and it showed as /dev/sdg and the partition as sdg1. I can unmount it and it still shows, but ...


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Your system log file will be updated when USB devices are connected. It is usually located in /var/log/syslog in Debian-based distros, and /var/log/messages in RedHat-based distros. The age of the log file can vary, as some systems will "rotate" log files once they reach a certain size, or discard older entries altogether. These settings are stored in /etc/...


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Finding: N2600 with 3.16 kernel :(Both with / without Quirk 0x80) Bandwidth per camera was 328 Mb. In my case overall allocated bandwidth was 656 (For 2 cameras) and max bandwidth for USB controller was 800. So there was no space available for my third camera. N2600 with 2.6.32 kernel Same my third camera did not work and memory allocation ...


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A Bootable USB device doesn't work that way. It would normally boot independent of your other OS and most times copied into RAM but some allow writing data for persistent boots, I.E to allow you to customize it by installing extra software on it.


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Because dd will copy the contents of the iso image along with partition table inside it, so having the USB device mounted is not recommended and backing up the contents of the USB device is because the dd command with wipe all data in it. If you have a USB stick with grub as the boot loader you can actually boot from an iso so that you don't have to wipe ...


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The Debian-Update.iso isn't bootable you need to download a bootable image from here. What are the update CDs/DVDs? Note that update CDs/DVDs are not meant to boot, they just contain the packages needed to upgrade an existing installation. If you don't have that existing installation, then you'll need to use the normal installation CDs/DVDs. After the ...


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As always I found the solution just after asking. I actually knew this one, just forgot to do it. One has to be in the vboxusers group to get access to usb devices. It's as simple as running sudo gpasswd -a <user> vboxusers in a terminal. For Ubuntu I think it's sudo useradd vboxusers


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Check user reviews on Amazon. This flash drive is reported to be slow. The specs never give a hard figure for write speed. The USB3 connector or USB3-compliance has never been a guarantee of speed. You may get different results if: you format a filesystem on it and write to files instead of the raw device you test with a hundred 1MB files instead of one ...


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First download this universal usb installer tool in your machine : http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/ Then you can install Kali using this tool in your USB Flash Drive. After installation is complete then in BIOS select USB Boot Enable then you will be able to boot through USB on your Machine ...


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If you want to run a systemd unit from your udev, you can now just name the unit (see man systemd.device). For example, if you look in your (/usr)/lib/udev/rules.d/99-systemd.rules you should find an example like SUBSYSTEM=="bluetooth", TAG+="systemd", ENV{SYSTEMD_WANTS}+="bluetooth.target" which has the 2 important points: you must add the TAG systemd, ...


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On Linux, the following should work without requiring a new driver: sudo modprobe ftdi-sio vendor=0x0001 product=0x0002


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I had the same issue. I solved it in 3 steps: Get the source code for linux from Tp-link website (source code) Get the right source code of the kernel in use. This very good tutorial was a great help: https://github.com/notro/rpi-source/wiki Look up in the Makefile in the source code from tp-link, to set up the right platform to compile and fix some minor ...



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