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0

To answer your question about out-of-the-box automounting: I wouldn't expect mounting to happen out-of-the-box without reference to your desktop environment (gnome). Debian 6 isn't that old. I've used LXDE from it or equivalent. The uselessly generic answer is that all desktop environments (DEs) will include a filemanager. Your filemanager will let you ...


1

Please read 4.3.3 at http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq4.html#MkInsMedia -- you're using the wrong image file and device.


1

Use install57.fs (the iso file won't work) and follow these instructions: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/180340.


0

openct-tool read Try this as root,or better,check the permission for USB cardreader(i use another cardreader called smargo and is connected on ttyUSB0,so i check /dev/ttyUSB0) and then redo openct-tool read


4

In general linux has very good support for network devices. If the device will work with your version of linux it will allow setup of nfs root with the appropriate initrd. so the problem with root over nfs is that you have to make an initrd that will accommodate it. NFS root without initrd may still work, but will not work with usb ethernet adapters as they ...


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According to the logs, the kernel is getting an error from the hardware when it tries to read the partition table immediately after detecting the card. Yet, when you call partprobe later, the kernel is able to read the partition table just fine. It looks like there is either a hardware error or a driver bug that causes the initial read to fail. It could be ...


1

Some advances, (I will edit this answer if/when I find a proper final solution). After doing a full backup of the device using @INDIVIDUAL-IT's dd command (I think using a bs=1M made the transfer painfully slow though). I was not able to mount the backup file, but a # dd if=backup.img of=backup-skip.img bs=1M skip=4 did create a mountable file ...


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For me it looks like your partition table is somehow messed up. make a complete backup of the card with dd: dd if=/dev/sdd of=backup.img bs=1M . If dd fails to copy the sd-card, then it is most likely hardware broken. You still can try your luck with ddrescue use TestDisk to try to recover the partition table. Do the recovery on the backup.img file, or ...


1

Maybe this is not obvious enough from the documentation, but: once you have that bootable USB media and boot it to the live environment, there is a window with two big choices: Try Fedora or Install to Hard Drive: Hopefully, everything should be clear from there. (And if you choose to "try" initially and close that window, there is an installer icon on ...


0

try this solution it may fix your issue: bootable usb using cmd


4

If I am correct, D means the process is being killed? Nope, it means the process is in an uninterruptible sleep. Sometimes this can be very problematic if the "sleep" is the kernel busy loop waiting on I/O; such processes can grind the system to a halt and there is not much that can be done, because you cannot kill them. However, it may also be ...


2

lsusb uses syscalls to read hardware information from the USB bus. If your USB bus is not configured correctly or there is a device which won't reply, the syscall will block until timeout. Perhaps you should plug one USB device at a time and issue lsusb command each time to find out which device (or combination of devices) is causing trouble. Signals are ...


0

From kernel sources (drivers/usb/core/usb.c): “busnum changes easily from modprobe order, cardbus or pci hotplugging, and so on”. Because of this we need to determine which “busid” belongs to the controller by PCI topology. You can also enumerate all USB devices by looking in "/sys/bus/usb/devices/usbN/" ("serial" is a PCI-slot number, "busnum" is a logical ...


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Try a more up to date Linux kernel (like the latest version), and if the problem persists, report the bug to the maintainers of this platform in the mainline Linux kernel.


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I had this happen to me once when I kept my USB camera plugged into the computer on the same bus. The camera was saturating the bus (even when not in use) and actually sending data right at the limit of that USB bus. Try unplugging the other USB devices. I noticed this by checking dmesg


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Once you've got the dfl updated with all the proper settings, try restarting minicom with no flags. This works for me most of the time.


0

i have the same kind of problem. Having the modules loaded, the bind show this : root@pi:~# usbip -d bind -b 1-1.5.5 usbip: debug: /build/linux-tools-TqR1ks/linux-tools-3.2.17/drivers/staging/usbip/userspace/src/usbip.c:134:[run_command] running command: `bind' usbip: debug: ...


0

It is technically possible if one of the device supports USB OTG, in which a port may act as master or as slave. You may set up the OTG device as slave, and let it act as an USB hard disk drive (so you don't even need special driver on the master). This is what a lot of phones and some cameras do. If you connect them to a printer they become master; if ...


15

Yes this is possible, but it is not possible by cutting two USB cables with USB-A connectors (what is normally going into the USB on your motherboard) and cross connecting the data cables. If you connect the USB power lines on such a self made cable, you are likely to end up frying your on-board USB handling chip. Don't try this at home! On most computer ...


3

you could use a USB bridge device which is available in a cable form-factor like this ... http://www.usbgear.com/link/ (auto-play video warning)


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In Non-UEFI machines, we can use GRUB2 to make USB stick bootable. Then, we can use 'ntldr' command in the GRUB2 to boot Windows from USB. menuentry 'Install Windows 8' { ntldr /bootmgr } See complete answer at my blog Creating a bootable windows USB from Linux



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