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When Linux detects a removable drive, it's smart enough to know that it should flush the data frequently. When you're mounting a loopback, it doesn't know that the backing device is a file which could be removed at any time. You can force the system to not cache writes using: mount -o loop,sync /media/your-usb/test.bin m This will result in slower ...


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If I plug in a USB and modify files and unplug it I don't lose data. Correction: you haven't lost data yet. That you've noticed. Presumably you, your distribution or the maintainer of the automounting program that you use has configured removable USB storage devices to be mounted with the sync option, which causes data to be written out immediately. ...


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According to your link the filename of the driver should be mt7601Usta.ko (.ko is the extension for kernel modules). Kernel modules are usually installed in /lib/modules/$(uname -r), so use find /lib/modules/$(uname -r) -name mt7601Usta.ko then sudo rm to delete it if you're sure it is the right module (or mv to move it out from the modules tree so it won't ...


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You can use 'KERNEL=="sd*", SUBSYSTEMS=="scsi" ' with some ATTRS to filter USB storage devices. Notice all the USB storage devices thus also pendrives and memory cards are recognized as SCSI devices so they are assigned as /dev/sd*. Here you have a very good tutorial on how to create UDEV rules: http://www.reactivated.net/writing_udev_rules.html


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I like installing from live image: http://www.debian.org/CD/live/ I prefer unetbootin for making usb stick. I don't trust myself with the "cat > /dev/sdX" - in case if I wipe some other partition. Less likely, but still.



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