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In general linux has very good support for network devices. If the device will work with your version of linux it will allow setup of nfs root with the appropriate initrd. so the problem with root over nfs is that you have to make an initrd that will accommodate it. NFS root without initrd may still work, but will not work with usb ethernet adapters as they ...


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I had a similar problem with a USB device using the pl2303 driver. Every now and again /dev/ttyUSB0 would vanish and /dev/ttyUSB1 would appear in its place. I solved it by running a cronjob every 15 minutes that did the following: if [ ! -c /dev/ttyUSB0 ] then echo `date` Device missing echo `date` Stopping zmconcopy `/usr/sbin/rczmconcopy stop ...


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Plug your usb drive and use udevadm info -a -p /sys/block/sd* where * is your disk assigned number(sda1,sda3,sdb2,etc) Then wrote a udev rule like this KERNEL=="sd*", SUBSYSTEMS==" block", ATTRS{serial}=="**************", SYMLINK+="sdb%n" Of course edit this based on udevadm info Another good solution is to use DISK_UID or LABEL for mount,then ...


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Is my guess right? Was VirtualBox indeed the culprit? All the clues do point in its direction. Probably so. If it was VBox, then how come it went on to hijack/reserve all USB devices in case of failure. I had only shared one USB device with it i.e. my USB wireless device. Is this a bug? Did my virtual machine have some virus, and it did something ...


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What you need to do is isolate the faulty component. It might be the operating system, but it also might be the USB cable, the USB hub, the USB port, and so on. Work your way through these steps; if you see a behavior change you've probably identified the responsible component. Try connecting the drive to a different port on the hub. Try connecting the ...


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Unmount the USB-drive and open up a new terminal. First get the device name with: sudo fdisk -l (Example: /dev/sdb1) Create new a mount point: sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb Then mount the USB-drive back on with ownership set to you: sudo mount -o uid=$(id -u),gid=$(id -g) /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb/ In the command above, the only thing you have to change is the ...


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You may want to check Easy2Boot. It's the most versatile and probably also best-documented tool for multiboot things. Specifically, it supports in particular Boot multiple linux ISOs each with separate persistence files [in addition, the author is also pretty helpful and really responsive even for in-depth questions] You could misuse that to reference ...


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It seems to be a problem with one of my USB controllers, plugging the devices in at the other controller resolved the issue.


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Please read 4.3.3 at http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq4.html#MkInsMedia -- you're using the wrong image file and device.


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Use install57.fs (the iso file won't work) and follow these instructions: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/180340.



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