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Grepping the drivers directory of the kernel source tree for RT5370 turns up; ./net/wireless/rt2x00/Kconfig: Supported chips: RT5370 Kconfig files are used to provide information for things like make menuconfig when configuring a kernel; this one happens to contain information for a number of Ralink PCI and USB based chipsets. From the same ...


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It should be mkfs .vfat -I /dev/sdb. sdb1 indicates you probably have more than one partition, and you're just formatting the first one, which happens to be 64MiB.


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Typically you can set the BIOS to handle USB support, which will work with whatever boot-loader from there. At that point you can have a separate image available to load with USB support for those times that everything goes to pot. This may not work as some USB devices aren't supported by some boot-loaders. Two notes: 1) I haven't tried this, though the ...


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I generally use this approach when plugging in a USB based printer. Unplug the USB printer cable from your computer and enter this command: $ tail -f /var/log/syslog Reconnect the USB printer cable, you should see some messages appearing. Press Ctrl-C to stop the logging. Check whether the printer gets correctly detected by the USB subsystem and ...


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go into the BIOS of the host and rearrange the order of the hard drives and removable drives. This will adjust the order as it appears to the Linux kernel.


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You need to buy a powered USB hub, less than $20 at places like Staples or Best Buy. You're not going to get the system to push more power out of a port than it is already doing.


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If you have the ftp user's home directory pointed to a mountpoint on the usb device, and the FTP client is set to write in the default directory, the hard drives will be not be utilized for the file storage. You may find that reads and writes are faster, but it's been my experience USB flash drives have life more limited than your hard drive. Personally, ...


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Ok, so here's the way the boot process works: firmware > bootloader maybe > kernel ${parameters} > initramfs > userspace maybe On a redhat installation disk their dracut system of scripts is what builds and constitutes initramfs and their anaconda installation system constitutes the final userspace. It is udev that handles the device setup - as in, it ...


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I'm not quite certain what you're asking. You mention 'port' several times, but then in your example, you say the answer is /dev/ttyUSB0, which is a device dev path, not a port. So this answer is about finding the dev path for each device. Below is a quick and dirty script which walks through devices in /sys looking for USB devices with a ID_SERIAL ...


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It seems that Udev (which is in the man) manages dynamic devices like USB devices when they're plugged in. It'll then instantiate them in /dev somewhere. (Like /dev/bus/usb/002 in my case.) This /dev node has to have some permissions, Udev takes the permissions from the files in /lib/udev/rules.d/, there's some arcane syntax which matches a device to an ...



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