Hot answers tagged

3

The installer considers that the USB stick you used for installation is a CD or DVD image; it left a reference to it in /etc/apt/sources.list as a source of packages for later. If you only wish to install packages from the Internet, you can remove the line mentioning cdrom: in /etc/apt/sources.list, then update the package cache with sudo apt-get update ...


2

Actually USB tethering creates a symmetric connection between your phone and PC. The direction your traffic can go is only defined by the network interface configuration and the services running on each side. In order to let the traffic go from the phone to the PC, you could (for example): configure your PC to run DHCP and share its internet connection ...


2

Blocking USB devices based on various attributes (including the class and/or protocol) or even conditions (e.g. "if this device is connected, then" or "if the local time is in this range, then") is possible using USBGuard. Here's an example rule that blocks a specific class of USB devices: block with-interface one-of { 02:*:* e0:*:* } The rule will block ...


2

If you want to share the same IP config/network between several interfaces configure bridging. In Debian it should be something similar to this: allow-hotplug wlan0 iface wlan0 inet manual allow-hotplug wlan1 iface wlan1 inet manual auto br0 iface br0 inet static bridge_ports wlan0 wlan1 address 192.168.1.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 You ...


2

You probably have to have an entry in /etc/udev/rules/70-persistent-net.rules that allocates the same wlan0 name to any wlan device that it detects. e.g. On one of my systems, I have a TP-Link TL-WN721N that has the following rule: # USB device 0x:0x (ath9k_htc) TP-Link TL-WN721N SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", DRIVERS=="?*", ...


1

Yes, as soon as you have filled up the systems buffers, your program will start to wait for the writes to complete to the slower disc. If that were not the case, the RAID software would essentially have to dynamically degrade the array and then sync in the background. In your case (!) I would upgrade the USB 2.0 external drive to a USB 3.0 enclosure.


1

First check if the usb is detected at all. Let's give you an example... Without connecting the USB pendrive: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT mtdblock0 31:0 0 16M 0 disk mtdblock1 31:1 0 7.5G 0 disk / Now with the pendrive connected: user@ubuntu:~$ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT ...


1

You need to modify your /etc/apt/sources.list and comment out the line beginning with deb cdrom:. Use the editor of your choice to add a # directly before deb cdrom: save the file and then run sudo apt-get update.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible