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What kind of filesystem is the USB device using? AFAIK most systems only support FAT32 (Some UEFI motherboards support more than that) - and then you must have the EFI bootblock in the appropriate location in the USB filesystem. FURTHERMORE - you are using a 32-bit ISO it appears. To boot with EFI, you MUST use a 64 bit version of a debian distro. If you ...


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If you have tried everything in the bios and nothing works try using a few different USB keys, the problem may be the key and not the system. I work with a lot of embedded systems and one painful lesson that has been learned is not all USB keys are created equal. We had an issue where sometimes we could boot from USB keys and other times it would fail. ...


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Looking at your image of the boot menu it seems you have 'Secure Boot' disabled, with 'OS Mode Selection' set to 'CMS OS' (Compatibility Support Module OS) but disabled by it's parent. I'd suggest enabling 'Secure Boot', ensuring 'OS Mode Selection' is still set to 'CMS OS', and then seeing what is in the 'Boot Menu'. Edit: You may also want to try ...


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You could swap the first partition entry in the partition table with the second one using the dd tool. I advice though that you make a backup of your files (or filesystems) before trying this procedure! I also won't claim a high degree of reliability afterwards because it is not common practice to have partition entries in descending order. Note for ...


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You can't swap sdaX for sdaY, which wouldn't do anything in Windows anyway. Your problem is a Windows problem, not a Linux problem: use the disk manager thingy in Windows to set a letter drive to the NTFS partition.


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I would look for BIOS section called something like BOOT DEVICES. Sometimes, devices need to be prioritized before they can be chosen from.


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After trying a lot of things, I found the solution: If I want to mount /home/user on a USB drive and keep all the files there after ejecting it, I have to first mount the USB drive like: mount -o uid=user /dev/sdb1 /hometemp Then, I have to mount the directory /hometemp on home/user like this: mount --bind /hometemp /home/user It works for me


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You need to specify the filesystem when mouting. Try mount -t vfat /dev/sd1i /mnt/usb0 If you're format is fat32, mount -t ext2 /dev/sd1i /mnt/usb0 if it is ext2


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Okay, if I get you right dd is what you need (comes with OS X). You can create bootable USB with the following command: dd if=/path/to/your/ubuntu.iso of=/dev/xxx bs=4M (Make sure you saved all necessary data from USB) Replace xxx in /dev/xxx with your USB device. You can list devices with diskutil list command to find out which one is your USB. After ...


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This is not normal... it suggests catastrophic failure. 512 MB is tiny so maybe the hardware is dying of old age now? FAT is pretty crude, I suggest you cut your losses and interrupt the fsck. It's not re-balancing b-trees or something intricate like that. Ctrl+c / kill -SIGINT is the gentlest approach, so it probably won't work. You can escalate to ...



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