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Usb devices can have multiple interfaces (eg a speaker with control buttons). Each interface is independent though there can be a descriptor saying they should work in association. If the interface uses a device class supported by Linux then a class driver will be used to make it available. There are class drivers for Communications Device Class and Mass ...


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After a lot of research, I found https://debian-administration.org/users/dkg/weblog/112: Copy/pasting here for longevity, all credit goes to the original author. (I modifed the steps a little so the EFI partition is only 200mb and the rest of the flash has multiple ISOs and shared ntfs files): parted /dev/sdX -- mktable gpt parted /dev/sdX -- mkpart ...


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Like Peschke said, you need to make it bootable. If you have access to a GUI, try Gnome Disks. Fire it up, click on your USB Flash Drive on the left panel, and in the right panel, underneath the partition map, click the small gears icon. Click "Edit Partition", and check the checkmark next to the word "Bootable". It will probably ask you for your password, ...


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A Bootable USB device doesn't work that way. It would normally boot independent of your other OS and most times copied into RAM but some allow writing data for persistent boots, I.E to allow you to customize it by installing extra software on it.


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You need to add noauto option to the /boot line of your etc/fstab, so the system would not try to mount it each time it boots. You need to mount the /boot partition before system updates as the lack of files in their places according to the package manager database may disrupt the booting. For example, updates to grub2 and kernel packages usually trigger ...


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Check user reviews on Amazon. This flash drive is reported to be slow. The specs never give a hard figure for write speed. The USB3 connector or USB3-compliance has never been a guarantee of speed. You may get different results if: you format a filesystem on it and write to files instead of the raw device you test with a hundred 1MB files instead of one ...


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I found the solution. It turns out that my version of Fedora 22 came without dbux-x11, which is necessary for a message that a USB stick got connected to travel among processes. If anyone has a similar issue, refer to the following document: http://www.techtimejourney.net/solving-the-automount-issue/


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I've just reformatted the t3 to ext4 and now the VM run just as smooth as from internal SSD. The read speed is now 366 MB/s, which is not too different from exfat, but the write speed jumped from 130MB/s to 325MB/s... I think this makes the difference.


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If this is a normal external harddrive, remove it from the case and connect it using SATA. This will help both if the USB bridge chip is damaged (because you then won't use it) but also when the problem lies with the drive itself: many USB bridge chips handle failing harddrives badly (for example often drive read timeouts lead to the entire USB device ...



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