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The reason can be write amplification, as the system tries to write in chunks that are smaller, than erase block (doing read/mod/write) + block misalignment. To check yours current setting do: cat /sys/block/sd**X**/device/max_sectors You can tune hall rules for those devices: Change value of USB "max_sectors" for an entire family of ...


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Ok, I know I'm a Windows user, not a linux user, but I had a similar issue a while ago when trying to copy files to a 16Gig data stick, to transfer to and from an old laptop. As it turned out, most of the file system formats for removable devices (ext2, fat32 etc), don't support copying files if the file is greater than 3.2Gigs in size, because of some ...


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Your 8GB stick has approximately 7.5 GiB and even with some file system overhead should be able to store the 5.4GiB file. You use tune2fs to check the file sytem status and properties: tune2fs -l /dev/<device> By default 5% of the space is reserved for the root user. Your output lists 97894 blocks, which corresponds to approximately 385MiB and ...


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I solved this by installing grub manually from another linux. After installing Debian on the USB drive, mount it to /mnt and then use the command sudo grub-install /dev/sdb --force --boot-directory=/mnt assuming that the device of the USB drive name is /dev/sdb (DON'T SUFFIX THIS WITH NUMBERS SUCH AS sdb1). You can know the device name using fdisk -l (run ...


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What you need to do is isolate the faulty component. It might be the operating system, but it also might be the USB cable, the USB hub, the USB port, and so on. Work your way through these steps; if you see a behavior change you've probably identified the responsible component. Try connecting the drive to a different port on the hub. Try connecting the ...


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Does the speed of USB-device matter? It matters for the boot process itself. It has to load the bootloader, kernel and initramfs from USB, which can be several MB altogether, so it can make a difference of a few seconds. Does the system contiously use the bootloader to decrypt No. Usually you can pull the USB device out as soon as the first kernel ...


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Hm, that's cool. I didn't know dmsetup could do that. :) My only answer would be to suspend/hibernate the machine, pull out the flash drive and do your manipulating somewhere else, then put the flash drive back in before resuming the system. Unfortunately, the filesystem on the device is likely to be corrupted by doing anything like this. Perhaps if all ...


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I would suggest using a program like R-Studio to first make an image of your memory stick. You can then run a detailed scan on the image file. Also go through the extra files found when done.



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