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The main reason is that the unpacked image while booting will expand itself, but where ? If it would be on RAM, the computer may not have enough of it to make it so. But if it would be done on the usb key itself on an ext4 partition, the "image" would not be intact anymore, since file are written on the same partition. Even worse, some changes can make the ...


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knoppix I guess there are 2 ways you can approach this: - You start from scratch and build it all yourself (LFS is probably a good choice then). This gives you maximum control and is a great way to learn, but it's also pretty steep and time consuming. - There's some existing distro that you like and take it as your starting point. Few years ago I took the ...


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Another distro worth considering is Puppy Linux. It's very compact, yet quite powerful and runs on a wide range of hardware, including older machines with limited RAM. It has various options for creating bootable USBs from a running Puppy installation. (Strangely, the Puppy sites do not offer a ready-to-go USB download: you need to get an ISO and boot from ...


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You can use unetbootin to install whatever distro you want to any device. It's a standalone executable so there isn't anything to install, simply download it and run. http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/ Unetbootin offers most of hte major distros as both the Live and regular versions.            ...


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You can try something like Fedora Remix http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Remix as well as Linux from scratch http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/. Then try to put them on a USB.


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After attaching your USB drive to a server, run in terminal lsblk, you will see all storage devices, that are attached to your machine. You may find there your USB drive (usually, they are named /dev/sdb or /dev/sdc, but is it NECESSARY to re-check that). After that, you have to mount it to have possibility to read/write, for example: mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/ ...


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First you need to connect your drive to the server. Second: type dmesg just after connecting, at the end you should see what the system "calls" the drive. Third: type mount to see if some automount mechanism already mounted the drive. If not, mount the drive manually with mount /dev/hdx /mountpoint


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Run udevadm info -a -n /dev/sdb where /dev/sdb is the device you want to identify to see what rules would match it. Pick one or more whose combination match only the devices you want to act on. This is a general strategy for coming up with udev rules; see Triggering an action when a specific volume is connected. In this case: DRIVERS=="usb-storage"


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You can use 'KERNEL=="sd*", SUBSYSTEMS=="scsi" ' with some ATTRS to filter USB storage devices. Notice all the USB storage devices thus also pendrives and memory cards are recognized as SCSI devices so they are assigned as /dev/sd*. Here you have a very good tutorial on how to create UDEV rules: http://www.reactivated.net/writing_udev_rules.html


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I am using centOS 7 with the Mate desktop. I ran into a the problem of not being able to mount a USB disk. Short answer. Make sure that you have the desired users that you want to be able to mount USB devises to the disk group.



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