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1

As your df output suggests, your drive is actually 15 GB in size, out of which 5.5 GB (38%) are used and 9.2 GB are free space. So the installation is fine. You can also see in your fdisk -l output that the end sector matches the final sector (off by one - nothing strange) and the start is at the beginning (minus the head sectors). However the problem ...


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To boot Ubuntu server I'm using a menuentry like so: menuentry "Ubuntu server installer" { set isofile=/isos/ubuntu-15.04-server-amd64.iso loopback isoloop $isofile set gfxpayload=keep linux (isoloop)/install/vmlinuz file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu-server.seed iso-scan/filename=$isofile quiet noeject -- initrd (isoloop)/install/initrd.gz } ...


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In my situation the proper format of grub.cfg should be the following: menuentry "to install CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-DVD" { insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 insmod ntfs set isofile='(hd0)/centos-7.1/CentOS-7-x86_64-DVD-1503-01.iso' loopback loop $isofile linux (loop)/isolinux/vmlinuz noeject ...


1

When you reference where the vmlinuz file is you reference from the ISO's root, so your centos-7.1 directory is wrong. To boot from an official ISO which has been marked as a live CD you will have to do some hacking. First to identify what vmlinuz and initrd I would mount the iso image, and find the directory where the vmlinuz and initrd are. THAT is the ...


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The CentOS wiki has a guide to installing from USB that covers 6.5 and later (including 7.x). Have you tried those steps? Basically, it involves writing the ISO image to a USB drive and booting from it. So, something like: dd if=CentOS-7-x86_64-DVD-1503-01.iso of=/dev/sdb Where /dev/sdb is your flash drive. That's slightly different from your Debian ...


1

You have overwritten the partition table with an ISO file system. The general expectation is that if a device contains an ISO file system, then that describes the entire contents of the media, and no further partitions are present, because that is how normal data CDs work. The system expects the rest of the media to be inaccessible, again because that is ...


4

After you dd an image to a flash drive, the drive will be divided in 2 parts: the image partition with the image's size and a blank part. That's normal. To get your drive go like before, just format it: mkfs.vfat -I /dev/sdb (as root).


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OK, finally I got the solution. Though I was already having package ntfs-3g previously installed, it was not sufficient enough for formatting of the usb-drive in ntfs-format. One needs to install ntfsprogs --- a subpackage of ntfs-3g for enabling the ntfs-format type partition in GParted. I installed it using sudo yum install ntfsprogs The ntfsprogs ...


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Point three and four don't make sense: /dev/sdb1 /media/usb1 vfat defaults 0 0 is ok, but is mounted with mount /dev/sdb1 or /media/usb1 /dev/sdb1 /media/usb1 msdos auto does not make sense, because "msdos" and "auto" are both for the filesystem type. You could try /dev/sdb1 /media/usb1 auto defaults 0 0 here. "noauto" in the options (here the "defaults" ...


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I'm not sure it matters that much. You could fdisk -l /dev/sda ; However, usually /dev/sda is your hard or SSD disk, and the USB stick would be e.g. /dev/sdi (then run fdisk -l /dev/sdi). Do a dmesg just after plugging the stick to find out. Be careful: very often /dev/sda is your system disk. Once a file system is mounted from the USB key, you might run ...


1

Might be a bit overkill, but SystemTap could help you identify what process is doing i/o on that disk. Prepare SystemTap [root@localhost ~]# stap-prep snip Install trace script [root@localhost ~]# cat >/tmp/traceio2.stp #! /usr/bin/env stap global device_of_interest probe begin { /* The following is not the most efficient way to do this. One ...


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You might have messed the USB drive, since dmesg is showing errors trying to read the device descriptor... so there is a chance of descriptor corruption. But as far as I see, the system recognizes your drive at the end. If you have udev in your Linux, try to see if the device is under /dev/disk/by-id/usb-*manufacturer_serialnumber*. In your case try with ...


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Installed Arch linux on the pendrive or used it to install Arch linux on hard drive ? You may try again after running sudo partprobe on Linux. There is a very good chance of killing your USB drive, during a reboot while some data is still writing or reading on the drive. If possible always do a sync before removing any pendrive or harddrive.



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