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There are alternative repositories from which you can install later versions of tmux, but they are not official. Installing from source is relatively easy: # install any dependency packages needed for building sudo apt-get install -y exuberant-ctags cmake libevent-dev libncurses5-dev # download link from official http://tmux.github.io/ site wget ...


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With this pin, a version from unstable will never be installed unless you explicitly request it. For example, if 1.9.2 from unstable is currently installed, and unstable now has 1.9.5, apt-get upgrade will not upgrade the package. If the version in stable changes, it will be installed provided that it's newer than the installed version. If 1.9.5 enters ...


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Arch Linux periodically releases an installer image. The Arch installer, unlike the Debian installer, always installs, or attempts to install, the newest version of Arch, regardless of the "version" of the installer (assuming a somewhat recent installer from the past few years). The Arch installer downloads the newest version of packages from the Arch repos ...


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In a perfect and smooth world, you would be able to start with a several years-old version and get the same thing after update as if you had started with the very last version available. But as Basile said, the evil is in the details. The Arch wiki recommend to do regular upgrades, mainly to avoid having plenty of manual interventions required at the same ...


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You can give SeaLion a try. It is very easy to install and operate. The graphs are detailed yet simple to understand. The alerting feature is useful and responsive. Plus there is a daily digest feature which sends you an email with the summary of your servers' performance that day. It's the simplest yet most useful solution I found to keep an eye on my ...


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Should be the same, but the glibc ghost vuln patched RPMs are only in paid support version repo LTSS included. The standard SLES 10 SP4 updates repo is end of support.


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Ok, I've found the solution: deleting all zcompdump files solved the problem: rm ~/.zcompdump*


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They both use the same back end dependency solver and pull from the same repositories, but due to different projects moving a different speeds, they don't pull from a unified local cache (including the metadata cache — the information about what updates are available and so on). And, because Fedora distributes content on a large volunteer mirror network, ...


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Run the following command to clean the metadata: yum clean all This will clean all yum caches including cached mirrors of your yum repositories. On the next run it will get a new list of mirrors.


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The CentOS-Base.repo file in /etc/yum.repos may have changed since you installed. Current mirror list is as below, with the baseurl= line commented out. mirrorlist=http://mirrorlist.centos.org/?release=$releasever&arch=$basearch&repo=os&infra=$infra


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You need to understand two things in F22: dnf doesn't autorefresh it's cache like yum does, in fact it goes out of it's way to lie to you sometimes. This means that like apt you actually need to run: dnf clean expire-cache && dnf upgrade In F22 the desktop isn't using the same package manager as the command line, anymore. They are using the same ...


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Minor versions like 6.2, 6.3 etc. are designed to be compatible after update (i.e. as long as 6.2 stays 6.2, and upgrades are made within it). Most importantly, kernel major and minor versions as well as glibc major and minor versions will stay the same. Any updates to these will not mean you need to re-compile applications. You would need to re-compile ...



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