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4

Yes, a dist-upgrade from wheezy to jessie will switch to using systemd as the init system. The jessie release notes devotes a whole section to this issue, also giving a recommendation about how to stay with your current init system: to prevent systemd-sysv from being installed during the upgrade, you can create a file called ...


1

Jessie will install systemd by default, even as an upgrade from Wheezy. After installation you can disable it by following the instructions at How to remove systemd from a Debian jessie/sid installation There are explanations of these commands on that page, but the gist is as follows: apt-get install sysvinit-core sysvinit sysvinit-utils reboot # BE AWARE ...


1

solution - just issue : sudo apt-get dist-upgrade which will update the held back package and so clear that notice


-1

If you consider yourself as a newbie, I don't think you do mind about sysvinit and systemd, or GNOME Fallback - what are Debian Wheezy 'key features', so yes, upgrading is highly recommended, for a more secure and stable system.


1

After editing the sources.list and doing an apt-get update as mentioned in @klimpergeist's answer, it is a better practice to do a apt-get dist-upgrade --download-only and then, apt-get dist-upgrade


5

You can adapt the entries in /etc/apt/sources.list, e.g. from deb http://extra.linuxmint.com qiana main to deb http://extra.linuxmint.com rafaela main Then apt-get update / apt-get dist-upgrade will do the job.


0

I found out that in Centos 7 yum-cron has nothing to do with the "Install Updates & Restart" prompt. I don't need or want automatic updates too. After some tricky research I discovered this feature is provided by a gnome package "packagekit". Three solutions: uninstall packagekit altogether (my favourite) disable packagekit from running (see ...


4

Debian 8 includes major upgrades to pretty much all the software included in the distribution; major changes include the switch to systemd by default and much better support for UEFI systems. You'll find details in the release announcement. Staying on Debian 7 is safe for now, because it is still fully supported. (As standard until February 2016, then on ...


0

The common way of upgrading Linux Mint is the Update Manager, but there is always the lesser known alternative, using the command line. To do so open a terminal and type: sudo cp -v /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list.bak Press [ENTER] and then type your password when prompted. ...


0

You can download a newer glibc binary, unpack it somewhere, and run the program with LD_LIBRARY_PATH= /path/to/new/glibc/lib /path/to/new/glibc/lib/ld-linux.so.2 /path/to/program Running an alternative libc is tricky; you may need to install a bunch of other libraries compiled against this libc. The easiest way to run a program with an alternative libc is ...


1

You have, presumably inadvertently, installed the apt-listchanges package. This packages lets you review the list of changes whenever you upgrade packages. The software that's running in the terminal and that waits for you to press q is the pager less, by the way. Remove the apt-listchanges package and this will go away. This is completely unrelated to ...



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