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CentOS (assuming you are on it) does not keep separate repositories for critical and other (e.g. enhancements) updates. But do check this solution from Red Hat.


-1

Could you elaborate on what "critical" means in your context? If you cannot do this in a manner a programme would understand there most likely is no such command to help you right away. EDIT: For critical="needs a reboot of the server" there's actually only a kernel-upgrade that forces this (which can be circumvented for HA systems to some extend using ...


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If SSH is enabled SCP should work as well. Depending on what you need to update you can download the newest CentOS release, SCP it to your server and configure YUM to use the repo in the new release. Then yum update with grab the packages from the new release. This is a simple way if you only need new CentOS packages, if you have other 3rd party software ...


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Here's what I would do. So, you can SSH to the server (let's call it server, from your machine; let's call it workstation. Set up an HTTP Proxy like Squid on workstation, listening on localhost:8080. From workstation, open a reverse SSH tunnel to server: ssh -R 8080:localhost:8080 user@server Configure yum on server to use localhost:8080 as a proxy. yum ...


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If you can SSH into the server, that means your firewall ports you to the server. But I can't possible belive that you use a oneway-er. So if you can go into the server, you should be able to yum upgrade with ease. Try this: What is the output of: wget http://ipinfo.io/ip -qO - Or better question: What is the output of the yum upgrade?


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Normally, on Redhat like distros (incl. Fedora), you can use the yum autoupdate facility. yum-autoupdate.noarch : Automatically update your machine daily via yum That will setup by default a daily cron job to run yum update on your system, taking care of updating any relevant packages you have that might be out of date, which I guess should also do for ...


3

You can update the Flash plugin using sudo update-flashplugin-nonfree which is provided by flashplugin-nonfree. Alternatively you can use Chrome's Flash plugin in Iceweasel using the browser-plugin-freshplayer-pepperflash package (and pepperflashplugin-nonfree).


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The correct command is: yum install php-module So if for example, I needed to update ldap, the command would be: yum install php-ldap This resolved all the warnings. Refer to http://rpms.remirepo.net/wizard/ for more detailed instruction. Thanks to a kind colleague pointing me in the right direction. Hope this helps someone in the future.


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This might be too case-specific. I resolved it by manually upgrading my window manager, sddm. sudo apt-get install sddm It now works for me.


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Run through these basics, it's unclear what you mean by 'gui'. When you boot, you see grub, I assume. You hit enter, and the boot process starts. When you say 'splash screen', do you mean what you see right after you start the boot from grub process? Does the disk chatter for a while? Guess 1 This is unlikely, but because it's what most people with this ...


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I'm trying to work this out at the moment as well. So far I've found this post on the FreeBSD forums which have lead me to try mkdir /basejail mount -t nullfs -o rw /usr/jails/basejail /basejail which allows the /usr/jails/newjail which is being updated to find the paths such as boot, etc and others and update them. So you can then run ezjail-admin ...


0

Clear yum cache, yum clean all, followed by yum makecache to refresh it. If this doesn't help, get a new CentOS repository definition file from the official website. Given you are using version 6, it has been a while since you installed it, and the repository definitions in /etc/yum.repos.d might be pointing to the wrong location to obtain the mirror list.


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You can fix broken package using synaptic package manager sudo apt-get install synaptic To fix broken packages Choose Edit > Fix Broken Packages from the menu. Choose Apply Marked Changes from the Edit menu or press Ctrl + P. Confirm the summary of changes and click Apply. Using command line You can fix broken upgrade or installation Open a ...


0

Firstly, backup Data Launch Software and from System Settings and on the Updates tab, disable "Pre-released update. Create a file called "99-downgrade-proposed" under /etc/apt/preferences.d/ gksu gedit /etc/apt/preferences.d/99-downgrade-proposed And in this file, paste the following: Package: * Pin: release a=saucy Pin-Priority: 1001 Package: * Pin: ...


0

Try to boot to maintenance mode or non-graphical login (probably by appending "3" to the kernel line), and try to update this way (if it was a hiccup, fixes might be available by now). If not, you could look at the logs to see what went wrong (and report it).


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Open "Dash" and Search for "Update Manager" then open it. In update manager Click on "Settings" Button. Disable all Third-Party repositories from "Other Software" Tab. Go to "Updates" Tab at the end of this window "Notify me of a new Ubuntu Version" Select "For any new Version" and click ok, then close the update manager. Now start "Update Manager" again ...


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You probably need to additonally specify the non SDK repo with your zypper dup like so: zypper dup --from SLE11-SDK-SP4-Pool --from SLES11-SP4-Pool Background: Problem: nothing provides product(SUSE_SLE) = 11.4 means the main SLES 11.4 product itself cannot be found. Use a command like zypper search --details SUSE_SLE to see which of your repositories ...


0

get sonic-pi manually and retry .... wget http://sonic-pi.net/files/releases/v2.9.0/Sonic-Pi-for-RPi-Jessie-v2.9.0.tgz tar -xvzf Sonic-Pi-for-RPi-Jessie-v2.9.0.tgz


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[At this point] GNOME 3.18 is the latest version, released in September 2015. You can try it [using this specific openSUSE live image; follow the instructions below to install it to a USB stick]. -- https://www.gnome.org/getting-gnome/ Alternatively, run the ISO download using your favorite virtual machine software (cough, GNOME Boxes). Disclaimer: ...


1

In Debian, this is usually a manual process, ultimately accomplished with apt-get upgrade (to upgrade to the current stable release, Debian 8 Jessie). There are other considerations which apt-get doesn't handle for you and these factors are listed in the Release Notes. Find your target release on the Debian Releases Page. On the release page you'll find a ...


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Officially, there's no tool - you're supposed to take care about it on your own: see https://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/release-notes/ch-upgrading.html, for example. Basically, it revolves around changing/adding URLs to repository for newer version and upgrading packages, sorting out any trouble that might come. You can see in the guide that it's ...


0

I confirm that is a problem in fstab. If you go inside fstab and delete the last line you made all is like before and the system start. I have a automount problem in sharing in VirtualBox 5 / debian 8. No problem in Virtualbox 4 / debian 7


4

What you're seeing is a backported Kernel. It is as linux-generic-lts-vivid - which is the Linux kernel from Vivid built for Trusty. It's installed on your system, so you have a newer kernel than the original one that showed in Trusty; so either you installed a newer Hardware Enablement Stack, or you installed from a later Trusty ISO (the Trusty 14.04.3 ...


0

Here is the official answer: Linux Mint does not support upgrading the way Ubuntu does. You appear to be trying to do an Ubuntu upgrade with Linux Mint and that appears to be the source of the confusion. What follows is not my view. It is from Linux Mint. How to upgrade to a newer release - Linux Mint Community From our point of view, Ubuntu does three ...


1

Use LVM instead. It's more flexible. For anything but a small installation, you certainly want multiple filesystems. The reasons include: If you have a runaway process that is trying to fill up your disk, it will be contained within the filesystem. With a single filesystem it can fill your entire disk. If you want to do a reinstall, it makes sense to have ...


1

You can absolutely keep /home on the same partition. I always do that, and have never had any problems upgrading. Upgrades won't try to repartition anything, they'll just replace files in-place. Whenever I've tried to split up partitions I've ended up running out of room on one of them and had to work around it or re-install just to fix that problem!


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Set it up so that the /home directory is on a separate partition. That way, if you have to do a fresh install, you can reformat the other partitions and keep the current /home directory. You can even have your /home directory as a second disk, and put 2 or more versions of Linux separate root partitions! I use a small main disk 80Gb (hda) for a root drive ...


0

Ubuntu 13.10 (saucy in you list) is EOL. You should update [source] Support for Ubuntu 13.10 ended on 17 July 2014. You can upgrade from terminal as described in ultimate guide for uprading to new version do-release-upgrade or follow any other guide you can find on the internet, such as howtoforge: open /etc/apt/sources.list: sudo gedit ...


0

It's not normal behavior for a functioning system. Looks like you have some obsolete repo references in there. I'm not familiar with Mint, but you can probably disable the local repo pointing to your CD-ROM unless you're actually using it to speed things up. Also, why are you pointing to Ubuntu repos. Are those binaries compatible with Mint? Nonetheless, if ...


2

450MB is not much for a root+boot partition on a modern amd64 system. If you want to install multiple kernels, you're going to have to reorganize your partitions. Even if you don't, it's pretty tight. Given the partitions you have now, I suggest moving the root partition to what is now /var. Since you're going to move the root partition, boot from rescue ...



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