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2

Don't reinvent the wheel. apt-get install apticron Apticron is a simple script which sends daily emails about pending package updates such as security updates, properly handling packages on hold both by dselect and aptitude.


1

I had been struggling with the same problem on Centos6.4 x86_64. I got the following error : Could not retrieve mirrorlist http://mirrorlist.centos.org/?release=6&arch=x86_64&repo=os error was 14: PYCURL ERROR 6 - "Couldn't resolve host 'mirrorlist.centos.org'" Error: Cannot find a valid baseurl for repo: base So, I fixed it by these steps: ...


1

You are in a pager program, where you can scroll through the change logs of the packages that you are installing. Ubuntu's default pager (like most unices out there, except some embedded or antique systems which have the more primitive more) is less. The installation process is not hung: it's waiting for you to read the changes. You can use arrow or page ...


1

I think the errors you're seeing are pertaining to APT's changelog facility. You can either disable it or remove it all together. 1. to disable In the file /etc/apt/listchanges.conf open it in a text editor and change the frontend line to none. [apt] frontend=none email_address=root confirm=0 save_seen=/var/lib/apt/listchanges.db which=news You can also ...


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You could try to upgrade just tmux first, and then perform the full upgrade. With some luck, the currently installed system libraries versions will satisfy the dependencies for the new tmux version.


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Now 18 months later this seems possible, as easy as exmplained in this blog entry: https://scottlinux.com/2014/04/01/apply-security-updates-to-freebsd-with-pkgng/


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Debian validated that version of their operating system against all of the features in 1.0.1e. 1.0.1f added more features to openssl that have not been thoroughly tested in the Debian environment. 1.0.1g is the version with all of the 1.0.1f features and the bug fix for heartbleed. Instead of introducing those features and possible incompatibilities by ...


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Updating an offline machine means finding a way to present the updates to that machine (this will most probably involve an external hard disk or USB stick, to move the files from online machines to the offline systems). In generic strategy terms, you have the choice between the three following solutions: Put the systems briefly online, behind some ...


1

A quick and dirty way on Linux (thanks to Lekensteyn): grep '/usr/lib/libssl1.*(deleted)' /proc/*/maps For precise parsing, you can call lsof with the -F option to get parsable output. Include the f field to filter on deleted files (fDEL) and the n field to get the path to the file. Note that the snippet below chokes on file names containing newlines. ...


4

I found two ways to do this: Debian-specific, lists most deleted/replaced files held by processes (with the exception of certain files known to be transient, e.g. stuff in /tmp): The debian-goodies package contains checkrestart, which accomplishes something like what I've described by scraping the output of lsof to find open files that are gone or replaced ...


0

I installed CentOS via Vagrant, and it came with the /etc/yum.repos.d/ directory prepopulated with things like puppet.repo. Lo and behold, puppet.repo and other included repos did not point to valid resources. So I removed them and yum works now.


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The upstream version is 1.0.1e, which is what is being shown. What is the problem? Note the 2+deb7u5 after the dash is Debian-specific.


6

Per the Debian bug tracker, the Heartbleed issue was updated in version 1.0.1e-2+deb7u5: Marked as fixed in versions 1.0.1e-2+deb7u5. Request was from Salvatore Bonaccorso to control@bugs.debian.org. (Mon, 07 Apr 2014 21:45:14 GMT) Full text and rfc822 format available. As such, you're running the updated version and are no longer vulnerable. Source: ...


2

Linux Mint is not meant to be updated over release boundaries. The suggested approach is killing your old installation by re-installing. I know this is a rather unsatisfying answer, but it's the way it's meant to be from upstream. Trying to do a "rolling" update ia is essence possible but might break in an unpredictable and thus horrible way and when trying ...


0

If you use aptitude, you have to look somewhere different: tail -20 /var/log/aptitude or cat /var/log/aptitude For older, zipped logs, use this command zcat /var/log/aptitude.1.gz or zcat /var/log/aptitude.1.gz | tail -20


1

Horrible approach. It's almost as bad as Dell's support for the best kernel in existence. This is how you do it to keep your sanity: Install unetbootin Make a USB FreeDOS bootable Put your Dell BIOS file on the USB Load FreeDOS in safe mode Execute the BIOS files from C:\ Oh Dell, if it weren't for the fact that I received this laptop for free, you'd ...


2

You need to make an uImage with your new kernel: make uimage and copy it to e.g. /boot/uImage-3.0.7. Then you can: either make uImage point to it: cd /boot; ln -sf uImage-3.0.7 uImage, or copy: cd /boot; cp uImage-3.0.7 uImage. Could you post the output of ls -l /boot? Alternatively, you can adjust the U-boot script to load the new uImage-3.0.7. I ...


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I don't know Zorin OS, but if it's Ubuntu-based (actually, Debian based), apt is surely installed. If it is, it works the same way in every distribution you can find !


3

I'm not a beagle board user, so the first thing you want to do is make sure you have an appropriate kernel source. The vanilla source does support various Cortex-A8 (ARMv7) chips, including "OMAP3 BeagleBoard", but I can't say for sure whether that is good enough without further patches. The 3.x kernel should be backward compatible with a 2.6 oriented ...


4

CentOS 6.x does not provide 2.4.x, only 2.2.x versions of Apache. CentOS like the Red Hat OS it derives from, RHEL are geared towards stability and so tend to lag behind what's cutting edge. So you'll need to either: compile it yourself find source RPMs and rebuild/recompile them find a repository that already has it pre-built in RPM form find pre-built ...


2

Check GRUB's menu.lst file, /boot/grub/menu.lst and make sure you're pointing to the new kernel you just installed. It should be the first one in the list and the default value above should be set to 0, indicating the 1st one in the list. Also I'd use the command yum upgrade as opposed to yum update. I typically do this: $ yum clean all $ yum update $ ...



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