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3

First things first. I had setup my 32 bit system as below. /boot - /dev/sda1 / - /dev/sda2 swap - /dev/sda3 /home - /dev/sda4 If you have not setup the /home in a different partition, then you have to backup all the data and restore it. You cannot do as described in this answer. /home is in different partition So if you have /home in different ...


4

You have hosed the installation and you need to do a fresh OS install. If you've been doing proper backups of your whole system, restore from your latest backup and then redo the upgrade. You should do such a backup before any OS update. If you don't have such a backup, then wipe the system and do a full OS reinstall. Even if you can kludge the system ...


0

It is just not supported. Neither it's supported in Debian, nor Fedora, nor Windows, nor Mac, nor any OS that supports downgrading. It's like Sergey said You can't turn mince back into meat by rotating the mincer's handle in the opposite direction The best option is to reinstall the previous OS after doing the backups. Gilles details a method that ...


0

Most people install updates to fix bugs, apply security updates and to get new features. As you remarked: unless you use technology like Ksplice the Linux system needs to be rebooted for an update to kernel to take effect, simply installing a new kernel is not enough. So if you do not reboot you might as well not have installed the kernel update for all ...


3

It won't affect the kernel itself (besides not taking advantage of the update). However, some newly installed programs might rely on newer kernel features. Also, if you run a program that relies on loading a kernel module then you may find that that module is no longer installed, and newly installed modules won't load in the old kernel. Basically, if ...


3

No, not really. The new kernels simply won't be used.


1

The solution is to remove vzkernel-firmware package: rpm -e vzkernel-firmware and exclude it by adding the line marked in bold to openvz yum repo file /etc/yum.repos.d/openvz.repo: [openvz-kernel-rhel6] name=OpenVZ RHEL6-based kernel #baseurl=http://download.openvz.org/kernel/branches/rhel6-2.6.32/current/ ...


0

Just in case anyone else ever has to the same thing I did here, I'll answer my own question. 1) Get the binary DVD iso image from redhat.com 2) Remove unnecessary rpms (GNOME, eclipse) so that it is less than 4GB (this allows it to be stored on a FAT32 filesystem) -copy this iso onto a USB 3) Remove the iso image that comes with the previous bootable USB ...


-1

This seemed to do the job: sudo rmdir /var/cache/apt/archives/lock Everything's work fine now.


0

I also want to keep original config files while doing automatic updates. You can add the following to /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/50unattended-upgrades Dpkg::Options { "--force-confdef"; "--force-confold"; }; See here for a good explanation of the options: http://raphaelhertzog.com/2010/09/21/debian-conffile-configuration-file-managed-by-dpkg/


2

I want to be clear for both you and any other person who might happen upon this thread. What you want to do is not possible. Arch makes no secret of the fact that it expects you to administer your system. Part of that responsibility is being present for the update cycle. Now, there are steps of the update process that you can automate responsibly, but it ...



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