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4

What you're seeing is a backported Kernel. It is as linux-generic-lts-vivid - which is the Linux kernel from Vivid built for Trusty. It's installed on your system, so you have a newer kernel than the original one that showed in Trusty; so either you installed a newer Hardware Enablement Stack, or you installed from a later Trusty ISO (the Trusty 14.04.3 ...


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You can update the Flash plugin using sudo update-flashplugin-nonfree which is provided by flashplugin-nonfree. Alternatively you can use Chrome's Flash plugin in Iceweasel using the browser-plugin-freshplayer-pepperflash package (and pepperflashplugin-nonfree).


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450MB is not much for a root+boot partition on a modern amd64 system. If you want to install multiple kernels, you're going to have to reorganize your partitions. Even if you don't, it's pretty tight. Given the partitions you have now, I suggest moving the root partition to what is now /var. Since you're going to move the root partition, boot from rescue ...


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Here's what I would do. So, you can SSH to the server (let's call it server, from your machine; let's call it workstation. Set up an HTTP Proxy like Squid on workstation, listening on localhost:8080. From workstation, open a reverse SSH tunnel to server: ssh -R 8080:localhost:8080 user@server Configure yum on server to use localhost:8080 as a proxy. yum ...


1

In Debian, this is usually a manual process, ultimately accomplished with apt-get upgrade (to upgrade to the current stable release, Debian 8 Jessie). There are other considerations which apt-get doesn't handle for you and these factors are listed in the Release Notes. Find your target release on the Debian Releases Page. On the release page you'll find a ...


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Use LVM instead. It's more flexible. For anything but a small installation, you certainly want multiple filesystems. The reasons include: If you have a runaway process that is trying to fill up your disk, it will be contained within the filesystem. With a single filesystem it can fill your entire disk. If you want to do a reinstall, it makes sense to have ...


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You can absolutely keep /home on the same partition. I always do that, and have never had any problems upgrading. Upgrades won't try to repartition anything, they'll just replace files in-place. Whenever I've tried to split up partitions I've ended up running out of room on one of them and had to work around it or re-install just to fix that problem!


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Set it up so that the /home directory is on a separate partition. That way, if you have to do a fresh install, you can reformat the other partitions and keep the current /home directory. You can even have your /home directory as a second disk, and put 2 or more versions of Linux separate root partitions! I use a small main disk 80Gb (hda) for a root drive ...



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