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13

As mentioned by @Kusalananda, usually upgrades are done by removing the old file, and creating a new one with the same name. This will actually create a new file with a new inode, leaving the system free to use the old one as long as it is open. As a simplified example, stuff like rm /bin/cat cp /new/version/of/cat /bin/cat will create a logically new ...


8

apt-get dist-upgrade does nothing because your system is already up-to-date… for wheezy. You've instructed your system to follow wheezy, and that's what it does. To upgrade to another release, you need to change your package sources to point to that other release. Package sources are declared in the file /etc/apt/sources.list. Edit this file and change all ...


4

Open the terminal and type the following command: sed -i 's/wheezy/jessie/g' /etc/apt/sources.list apt-get update apt-get upgrade apt-get dist-upgrade apt-get autoremove apt-get clean apt-get dist-upgrade -f reboot


3

Files won't be "properly deleted" if they are unlinked while they are still opened. When they are closed, the disk space that they used will be considered "free" again. This goes for currently running applications and their shared libraries as well. The only thing that I could see failing would be if a program used dlopen() to load a shared library on ...


3

From their site, published June 30, 2016: It will also be possible to upgrade from Linux Mint 17.3. Upgrade instructions will be published next month. Link: Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” MATE released! Assuming they do it as they did before, it'll show up as an option in the Mint Update Manager.


2

For the do-release-upgrade command to work, you need to have update-manager-core installed. sudo apt-get install update-manager-core However, you can still upgrade without installing that package. You have 2 options: through the update manager GUI through apt-get I suppose option 1 is not showing you any updates, otherwise you would have chosen that. So,...


2

Different releases of Debian have different versions of tmux. Take a look at the package page for tmux. It seems that apt-get is looking at wheezy (a little old). The Debian releases-page shows how old: 2013 (and still being updated). By the way, you could be running Ubuntu or some other downstream distribution rather than Debian, but it's likely there ...


1

If using Debian stable, and you have a package you want updated, you can use backports, as seen in https://backports.debian.org/Instructions/ in short: add "deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main" (after main, can also add contrib and non-free, if using them.) to your sources.list, which by default is /etc/apt/sources.list (as root, or ...


1

I would also suggest that you comment out any third party repositories that may have been added to the file /etc/apt/sources.list, or added in the directory /etc/apt/sources.list.d It is probably easier to turn off any third party repositories in the /etc/apt/sources.list.d directory using the software manager. Choose 'Edit' then 'Software Sources'. These ...


1

As I understand, upgrade step by step is most supported way. Upgrading is not only replacing old files to new, it also can contain conversion of old configuration to new (install script in rpm can do many things). This upgrade process tested for some popular upgrade scenarios and can depends on core system components (glibc binutils ...). There possible not ...


1

As Krzysztof points out, you'll need a separate cron entry for this. It's probably best to call unattended-upgrade directly (it's a python script), to ensure package blacklists/whitelists, reboots and other details are handled appropriately. For example: echo "0 0-23/4 * * * root sleep $(( $RANDOM % 14400 ));PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/...


1

I upgraded Fedora 16 to 17, then to 19, then to 21, and I think most of the issues I hit probably would have been hit in a clean install anyway. However, each upgrade took about a full day including doing a full drive image beforehand, then following all the detailed upgrade procedures I've read which include doing things like checking for RPM packages ...



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