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16

Updating Userland is Rarely a Problem You can often update packages on a live system because: Shared libraries are stored in memory, not read from disk on each call, so the old versions will remain in use until the application is restarted. Open files are actually read from file-descriptors, not the file names, so the file contents remain available to the ...


15

Driver updates occur when the kernel is updated, with each version of a new kernel new features (and bugs :) in drivers are introduced and bugs are fixed. You can read the kernel's changelog if you want to see what changed, e.g. for kernel 3.3.7, also posts in the Linux Kernel Mailing List, e.g. Linux 3.4 released. KernelNewbies also provides information on ...


14

The first place to check is if there's a backport, but there isn't, which isn't surprising since maverick has vim 7.2 too. The next thing to try is if someone's put up a repository with vim 7.3 packages somewhere, preferably a PPA. There are many PPAs with vim, including several with 7.3 (not an exhaustive list). If you don't find a binary package anywhere ...


13

You have several options: Either wait until the version you need is present in the repository you use. Compile your own version and create a deb. Find a repository that provides the version you need for your version of your distribution(e.g. Git PPA). If you don't need any particular feature from the newer version, stay with the old one. If a never ...


12

I've just had exactly this problem. As Gilles suggested, upgrading tar is the answer but (surprise surprise) tar can't be upgraded in the usual way because dpkg requires version 1.23 or later before it'll unpack and install the latest tar deb. dpkg really needs an explicit dependency to ensure that when a later version of dpkg is installed, the latest tar ...


11

I saw this coming about 6 months ago when I started playing with ZFS. At the time, the next release of OpenSolaris was already way overdue, and I had yet to be impressed by the progress between any two releases I'd seen over the years I'd been watching the project. It was clear to me that OpenSolaris wasn't winning hearts and minds, so by the time I ...


8

There are two types of drivers in distributions: compiled in kernel (and/or distributed in the same package) and distributed as kernel modules in separate packages. Most distributions when you perform system update updates all of the installed packages including packaged kernel modules and kernel itself, so whole update process is invisible to user.


8

We distribute our commercial software as .deb packages with our own Debian repository server. You can create and maintain the repository with the standard reprepro tool and you can then configure the web server that hosts the repository to require authentication for the *.deb packages. On the customer side, the credentials are supplied in the sources.list ...


7

Testing will always point to the current testing. You do not need to change anything if you wish to stay on testing. The only time you would need to change to remain on testing is if you specified the release by name eg: deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian wheezy main


6

Based on the error messages, it looks like your upgrade is trying to upgrade your 5.3.6 version of PHP to an older version (5.2.17), and it's running into conflicts. Did you add an extra repo in the past? What is the output of yum list *php* I'd expect that you have 2 different repos listing PHP. On that assumption, the fix would be to exclude the ...


6

It's a combination of a number of factors. Most distros use major releases as the time to implement significant, sometimes breaking changes. For example, Fedora 15 added systemd and Ubuntu added upstart in 6.10. Debian is a very conservative distro in many ways. Large, breaking changes are frowned upon. It's a consequence of that, for example, that ...


6

As mentioned in Why does a software package run just fine even when it is being upgraded?, the lock is placed on inode not on filename. When you load and execute a binary, the the file is marked as busy - which is why you get ETXTBSY (file busy) error when you try to write to it. Now, for shared libraries it is slightly different: the libraries get memory ...


6

Before Fedora 17 None of the Red Hat distros prior to Fedora 17 included the ability to do dist-upgrades as you've asked. This had been a long discussed option on many peoples' wish list but had never been implemented. But before we start a clarification... According to the Upgrading topic in the wiki, there was a method where you could put a DVD in ...


6

The d means "download only", which sounds like it will just fetch the packages for your update but not apply them. It is the same as yum --download-only according to this mailing list archive.


6

Per the Debian bug tracker, the Heartbleed issue was updated in version 1.0.1e-2+deb7u5: Marked as fixed in versions 1.0.1e-2+deb7u5. Request was from Salvatore Bonaccorso to control@bugs.debian.org. (Mon, 07 Apr 2014 21:45:14 GMT) Full text and rfc822 format available. As such, you're running the updated version and are no longer vulnerable. Source: ...


5

I had the exact same problem with my Fedora installation, and the solution is quite simple : partitions. Since I have created a /home partition, I format / but all my preferences for every program are staying. Just separate your data from your system with partition, and on reinstall, make sure to format only /, and specify your home partition as mounted on ...


5

There are two separate, but related, issues. First, package-query is an unsupported package (from the AUR) and it is your responsibility to rebuild it whenever other dependencies—in this case pacman—are updated. Uninstall it, update pacman and then rebuild package-query against the newer version. Second, in addition to Shawn's advice to force ...


5

Except for that urging feeling that I should upgrade the computers, I wouldn't see any reason to hurry. For home use security is not that much of a concern... Are you running those machines as servers of some sort? Anyway 24 days is like nothing so don't worry too much about it. Being out of support is just like stop installing updates. It doesn't mean ...


5

3.3 is not currently in Ubuntu it seems. The most recent version is still 3.2. One thing you can do is package it yourself. This is (probably) not difficult. Here is an outline of how you could go about it. Download 3.3 sources from the Nagios site or wherever. Download Ubuntu sources for 3.2 or whatever version you have available apt-get source nagios3 ...


5

Probably, on that distribution, it is normal. It depends on how the package manager installs the new kernel. I suppose that your package manager (when upgrading the kernel) deletes the old kernel-modules directory immediately. This way, when you try to mount a vfat-formatted usb stick, the kernel will fail to load the needed vfat kernel module. To verify ...


5

Update: Found a site that has a pretty good explanation: LINK From the link: Then we have to do some configuration. Debian has a script to maintain different version of programs like java called update-alternatives. update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/java java /usr/lib/jvm/jdk1.7.0/bin/java 1065 update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/javac javac ...


5

You need to put the package “on hold”. You do that by issuing echo 'your-package hold' | dpkg --set-selections Use dpkg --get-selections [package pattern] to see what the current selections are. Use echo 'your-package install' | dpkg --set-selections to make the package upgradeable again.


5

Did you add the repositories of the release to your sources.list? Also, upgrading to a new version in Debian or Ubuntu usually is only installing new versions of the applications you have installed. In some cases it will actually change packages (for example the Ubuntu change to Unity) but this doesn't always happen.


5

As you found and set in your config, apt-listchanges should not prompt if you set the frontend to none. You can also set the environment variable APT_LISTCHANGES_FRONTEND=none to achieve the same thing. It sounds like what you really want to do is use the unattended-upgrades package. It handles everything for you: disabling apt-listchanges, setting the ...


5

Well, in my case the start of the polkit service failed. A reinstall of this service made my system work: yum reinstall polkit Found it on http://ekuric.wordpress.com/2012/11/10/upgrade-to-fedora-18-aka-spherical-cow/#comment-135


5

It depends on your distribution. For debian-based distributions (such as Ubuntu) you can use the command apt-offline http://www.researchut.com/tools/apt-offline This guide provides another methods for updating ubuntu offline: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Synaptic/Offline


5

Unless you have a particular reason, just use the packages provided by your distribution. That is, after all, the point of using a Linux distribution. You get stability, some expectation of compatibility, and security updates — all with the convenience of yum update. If you are running an application that requires a particular version, or if your whole ...


5

Why can't the system itself be updated the same way as other software packages, via small, continuous updates ? It could, as you notice some distros do work that way. The process of upgrading essentially is a set of updates; your distinction between "updating the system itself" and "not the software packages you have installed" is a little imprecise ...


5

The only method I've ever heard of that allows you to forgo performing a reboot is through the use of the KSplice technology. excerpt What is Ksplice Uptrack? Ksplice Uptrack lets you apply 100% of the important kernel security updates released by your Linux vendor without rebooting. Ksplice Uptrack is available for Oracle Linux, free of ...



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