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Apparently LibreOffice tries to use ISO-8859-1 by default, which is causing the problem. In response to this bug report, a new parameter --infilter has been added. The following command produces U+2014 em dash: libreoffice --convert-to csv --infilter=CSV:44,34,76,1 --headless --outdir dir file.xlsx I tested this with LO 5.0.3.2. From the bug report, it ...


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You could try, $ libreoffice --convert-to \ > csv:"Text - txt - csv (StarCalc)":"44,34,0,1,,0" \ > --headless --outdir dir file.xlsx Here, you have a very detailed help about.


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You have probably figured out the answer for yourself by now. However, if anyone happens to google your question and end up here, the following steps fixed it for me: Navigate into your System Settings → Languages → Input Methods. If "IBus" is not available in the "Input Method" drop-down menu, click the "Add Support for IBus" button. Else, continue to ...


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Hello Googler from the future! I have found a fix with the help of this post , hopefully it will work for you: Open up your System Settings then go to Languages → Input Methods. On the dropdown menu in the "Input Method" section select "IBus". If the option is not avaible, click the "Add support for IBus" button, then do step 2. Restart your machine.


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For one-line strings, the GNU implementation of wc has a -L (a.k.a. --max-line-length) option that does exactly what you're looking for (except the control chars).


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That is actually four questions: How do I know their code points? Some sort of regex? How do I count how many character cells a string takes? How do I erase everything that was outputted? OP mentions xterm, but only the last two are possibly specific to xterm. For (1) and (2), the echo command is not much help. You are better off using printf, which ...


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To expand on the hints at possible solutions using col and ksh93 in my question: Using the col from bsdmainutils on Debian (may not work with other col implementations), to get the width of a single non-control character: charwidth() { set "$(printf '...%s\b\b...\n' "$1" | col -b)" echo "$((${#1} - 4))" } Example: $ charwidth x 1 $ charwidth ...


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I found a python library, fonttools (pypi) that can be used to do it with a bit of python scripting. Here is a simple script that lists all fonts that have specified glyph: #!/usr/bin/python from fontTools.ttLib import TTFont import sys char = long(sys.argv[1], base=0) print u"Looking for U+%X (%c)" % (char, unichr(char)) for arg in sys.argv[2:]: ...


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Uh, sure, just use export (works in any Bourne-style shell), or typeset -x, or a few other variants. To print specific variables, you can use typeset -p VAR1 VAR2 VAR3. These all print the values in a quoted form that can be re-read by zsh. If you want just VARIABLE=VALUE even if the value contains special characters, you can write a function: zprintenv () ...


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Perhaps there isn't one because it would be non-POSIX. Further reading: getenv - Environment variable on Mac OS X and Linux Getting environment Variables as UTF-8 Strings in Linux Granted, zsh could implement an extension, but unless other applications can read the variables, they are of limited use. Shell variables and environment variables are ...


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Answering my own question: in gentoo you have to build urxvt with unicode3 and vanila USE flags, and without alt-font-width flag


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You can use Compose s o (as well as a few other synonymous sequences) to obtain the character §. This is both shorter and more mnemonic than Shift+Ctrl+u a7 enter (you didn't mention pressing Enter but I had to do that do get it to work for me). The compose sequences are meant to be easy to remember, such as + - for ± or e ' for é. IMHO that's certainly ...



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