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1

I found the solution and I'll leave the answer here, as it might be useful for other people who have the same problem. Open the text file using different encoding! For me (Polish language), it was CP1250 (Central European). To do this, open gedit, select "Open" option and find the neeeded file. Then choose the character encoding (bottom left side) and pick "...


4

The standard 8-bit encoding for Polish is latin2 a.k.a. ISO 8859-2. The text with ³ for ł, ¿ for ż etc. is the result of interpreting a sequence of bytes that represent text in latin2 as if they represented latin1. Latin1 a.k.a. ISO 8859-1 is the standard encoding for most West European languages. If the text is encoded in latin2, then you need to convert ...


0

I asked the GraphViz developers about this and looks like the answer is that there is no way to do that: We looked at this problem years ago. The native graphviz -Tps Postscript driver does not have any custom font loading capabilites. As mentioned here: http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Unicode-HOWTO-5.html rendering utf-8 fonts in Postscript is a do-it-...


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We can take advantage of the fact that the UNICODE code point of Persian numerals are consecutive and ordered from 0 to 9: $ printf '%b' '\U06F'{0..9} ۰۱۲۳۴۵۶۷۸۹ That means that the last hex digit IS the decimal value: $ echo $(( $(printf '%d' "'۲") & 0xF )) 2 That makes this simple loop a conversion tool: #!/bin/bash ( ### Use a locale that use ...



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