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4

You haven't said which cut you're using, but since you've mentioned the GNU long option --characters I'll assume it's that one. In that case, note this passage from info coreutils 'cut invocation': ‘-c character-list’ ‘--characters=character-list’ Select for printing only the characters in positions listed in character-list. The same as -b for now, ...


2

This should work at least for your example: $ perl -CS -Mutf8 -lne 's{ (?= [\p{Arabic}\p{Cyrillic}] ) [\p{Arabic}\p{Cyrillic}\p{Common}\p{Inherited}] + (?<= [\p{Arabic}\p{Cyrillic}] ) }{}xg || print' < file kedi cat candy şeker çağrı resumé The basic idea is to use the \p to define a set of code points, in ...


1

Ultimately gnome-terminal uses fontconfig to (among other things): ...efficiently and quickly find the fonts you need among the set of fonts you have installed, even if you have installed thousands of fonts... In the API documentation you can find functions to query fonts character ranges and for operations on character ranges, but the documentation is ...


3

The file command just guesses what is in the files you have it analyse. It does the analysis by reading a certain amount of bytes from the header of a file, sometimes in a multiple step process (if it find some clear marker at the beginning). In a non structured text file it will certainly read more than the number of characters than are in your extended ...


5

I think you're confusing "encoding" and "character sets". In the first case, the file contains only characters found in US-ASCII. This means that the file will look the same no matter what language settings you're using to display it. In the second case, the file now contains characters belonging to the UTF8 character set, because that's what you put into ...


1

This displays all high characters as <xx>: set encoding=latin1 set isprint= set display+=uhex Any single-byte encoding will work, vim uses ASCII for all lower chars and has them hard-coded as printable. Setting isprint to empty will mark everything else as non-printable. Setting uhex will display them as hexadecimal. Here is how the display changes ...


1

konsole does and supports bidirectional writing


0

If you need to find out the encoding of a particular file, you can use the file command: $ cat findenc.txt Let f be a measurable function from (Ω,F,μ) to (R,B(R)). then μ(|f|>t) as a function of t is Riemann integrable over [0,∞). the expectation of the measure f induces on its codomain i.e. ∫_Ω |f| dμ = ∫_[0,∞) μ(|f|>t) $ file findenc.txt ...


0

How do you find out the encoding charset of the example text? If you mean how to find the charset while the example text is open in emacs, then perhaps M-x describe-current-coding-system in emacs is what you're after?



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