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2

You can use this if you are on a little endian system: iconv -f utf-8 -t ucs-4le | od -tx4 or this if you are on a big endian system: iconv -f utf-8 -t ucs-4be | od -tx4


1

After some time spent talking to the poster in the U&L chat room, it because obvious this was a Python problem, specifically an encoding problem. The issue was that the poster's Python 3 was refusing to handle utf8 characters in scripts correctly. The specific errors in the question above were for a utf8 character, I think the copyright symbol. I then ...


0

After some fiddling, I found it was system-related rather than emacs-related. Apparently my locale settings were messed up somehow, as we saw in the OP: locale: Cannot set LC_CTYPE to default locale: No such file or directory locale: Cannot set LC_MESSAGES to default locale: No such file or directory locale: Cannot set LC_ALL to default locale: No such file ...


1

According to the Unicode standard, these are wide characters. See http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr11/tr11-28.html: 4 -> ED4 for the definition of "W", and 6.3 -> Data11 to check that these characters indeed belong to this category.


2

enscript just does not support Unicode. You need to use a different tool such as paps to convert text to PostScript. With --header option an output .pdf is similar to one produced with enscript: $ paps text --header | ps2pdf - outheader.pdf


5

A number of versions of sed support Unicode: Heirloom sed, which is based on "original Unix material". GNU sed, which is its own codebase. Plan 9 sed, which has been ported to Unix-like operating systems. I couldn't find information on BSD sed, which I thought was strange, but I think the odds are good that it supports Unicode too. Unfortunately, there ...


0

Works for me with GNU sed (version 4.2.1): $ echo -ne $'\u9991' | sed 's/\xe9\xa6\x91//g' | hexdump -C $ echo -ne $'\u9991' | hexdump -C 00000000 e9 a6 91 (As another replacement for sed you could also use GNU awk; but it don't seem necessary.)


12

Perl can do that: echo 汉典“馑”字的基本解释 | perl -CS -pe 's/\N{U+9991}/Jin/g' -CS turns on UTF-8 for standard input, output and error.


15

Just use that syntax: sed 's/馑//g' file1 Or in the escaped form: sed "s/$(echo -ne '\u9991')//g" file1


1

Step-by-step manual how to install to Linux the multiple fonts from the specific folder: Open the Terminal application and gain root privileges by typing su and the correct root password. Go to the folder with the fonts by using cd command, e.g suppose, the user font folder is in Downloads: cd /home/**user_name**/Downloads/Fonts Copy the font files to ...



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