New answers tagged

0

I had a similar problem, I seemed to only see strange client_input_channel_req: channel 0 rtype exit-status reply 0. User I was trying to ssh into didn't have a shell by default. I ran the following: chsh -s $(which sh) username And then I was able to ssh. Note: Running su username was returning exit-code 1 (was failing) and now it just works.


0

I have encountered this on Mac OS X where the configuration in ~/.bashrc had an problem which caused ssh to work, but sftp to not work. @st├ęphane-chazelas seems to have the right idea in the comments above. On the remote system via SSH, rename ~/.bashrc to ~/.bashrc-MOVED and try it again and see if it works; then restore ~/.bashrc and determine the issue. ...


0

It seems the problem, so to speak, was my wrong assumption that a systemd service respects the ulimit configured in /etc/security/limits.conf. As it turns out a daemon configured via systemd does intentionally ignore settings in the limits.conf and requires a LimitNOFILE configuration in the service configuration file. Updating my systemd unit file fixed ...


0

For RHEL and related distributions, there is now a new directory /etc/security/limits.d The files within this directory silently override the information in the /etc/security/limits.conf file(!). Check for 90-nproc.conf and you'll see the culprit there. You can create new files in this directory - they are read in numeric order, so for application ...


3

They are described quite well in the standard AIX documentation. fsize : Identifies the soft limit for the largest file a user's process can create or extend. core : Specifies the soft limit for the largest core file a user's process can create. cpu : Sets the soft limit for the largest amount of system unit time (in seconds) that a user's process ...


2

I don't believe there is a specific sftp file limit. There are regular filesystem file limits, and limits imposed by ulimits, but they're not special to sftp. So the answer is, sftp file transfers are limited by either the target filesystem limits, or the ulimits set for the user in question. Given modern AIX filesystems have very large limits, you're ...



Top 50 recent answers are included