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2

From what I can understand, you want to create a rule when you build the OS and have it reside in the rootfs. If that's correct, then you need to add a recipe for it. Store your rule in a directory such as the following "distro/meta-myproject/recipes-core/rfs-myproject/rfs-myproject/myrule.rule". Then, up a level in the rfs-myproject folder you need a rfs-...


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To simplify in Xfce for example please install "arandr" which should be available in your distro packages. Configure your display using "arandr" then save it as "displayLayout" for example. Arandr should add for you ".sh" extension so it can be directly used in "function connect()" as written in the script "hotplug_monitor.sh" mentioned by iyrin above, for ...


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You can probably check that the directory is a mountpoint (as per this answer) before copying anything. I would put the check in an infinite while loop, but I don't think this is very orthodox, since it could hang.


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udev does not have only serials to match devices, you can use any property available. So you can use almost any thing different in udevadm info /dev/... & udevadm info -a /dev/... from both devices with same serials. If you can share those outputs for each device, I may able to help. From your answer, it seems you already got vendor/model not the same, ...


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The root cause was that initial release of ath9k driver in kernel-2.6.27 had limited chipset support. Kernel-2.6.32 has support for the AR9227 chip in TP-LINK TL-WN851ND PCI card. Credit for the solution goes to @jeremy31 who suspected that the installed ath9k driver may not support the actual chipset. What I have learned is that even if module installs ...


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Yes, either su -c 'udisksctl mount -b /dev/sdd --no-user-interaction' - thb or su - thb udisksctl mount -b /dev/sdd --no-user-interaction exit will mount /dev/sdd on e.g. /media/thb/mydevice without causing an unwanted GUI authentication dialog to pop up.


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Try something like this: evdev:atkbd:dmi:bvn*:bvr*:bd*:svn*:pn*:pvr* On my Thinkpad x240 on Ubuntu 16.04 it works fine: cat /etc/udev/hwdb.d/61-ThinkPad-X240-keyboard.hwdb # ThinkPad X240: switch End and Insert keys (so that when Fn-Lock is enabled, End works without Fn). #keyboard:dmi:bvn*:bvr*:bd*:svnLENOVO:pn*:pvrThinkPadX240:* evdev:atkbd:dmi:bvn*:...


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You can use gvfs and udisks to automatically mount USB devices. You can do the same using a file manager that supports automatic mounting. I use PCManFM and gvfs and my USB devices are automatically mounted to /run/media/$USER/$DEV_LABEL.


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There's no reason to make a udev rule executable. They aren't executable (the kernel wouldn't do anything with them) and udev doesn't attach a special meaning to executable rule files. A udev rule must not be writable to non-root user. A user who modifies it could inject arbitrary code that is run as root. Udev rules don't normally contain anything ...


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"device files" are a special type of file (in much the same way directories, symlinks, named pipes and unix domain sockets are special types of file). They do not store user data directly, instead they store a major and minor device number and a device type (char or block). Filesystems designed for unix-like systems will have support for storing device files....


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Well, this is not an answer to the question but brings me a solution. so here it is. I fiddle quite a bit with Udev rules, could not get anything better than my Arduino persistently appear on /dev/arduino01 (will use /dev/arduino02, /dev/arduino03,... for other jigs) My testing script is in Python, I just found out that there is a nice library called ...


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Your script doesn't set the DISPLAY environment variable. It should look like this: #!/bin/sh export DISPLAY=:0 xrandr --output LVDS-1 --auto --output DP-5.8 --off



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