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1

I'm not completely sure, but I think that an udev rule applies to the add action by default. The udev rule is on a graphics card, not on a monitor; so it runs when a graphics card is added to the system, which in practice means at boot time. Plugging in a monitor results in a change action, not an add action. So the udev rule should specify a change action. ...


4

Most filesystems have unique UUIDs and have labels which you can set to a distinctive values. These allow you to refer to the volume containing the filesystem through /dev/disk/by-uuid or /dev/disk/by-label. Other types of volumes (RAID, LVM, etc.) generally have a name as well. RAID and LVM volumes are assembled based on unique identifiers in the physical ...


12

First three octets in a MAC address uniquely identify the manufacturer of the device. Udev rules allow you to match any number of characters with an asterisk. Thus, you can write a generic rule that will match any device of a specific vendor: SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", ATTR{address}=="74:2f:68*", NAME="wlan0" Alternatively, you can stop matching on ...


1

ifconfig = Solaris ipconfig = Windows ip = Linux That I know, but am certainly open to additions and corrections.


0

I give up trying this. It is not working either with 16.04 LTS which is using 4.4 linux kernel. And on Windows 8.1 with proper driver ended with failed too. Here I am finally using BSD (OpenBSD, NetBSD, and another BSD-based) succesfully working. On BSD, it is mounted as ulpt0. It's a dead end trying on other Linux (Debian-based, Arch, RedHat, blabla). ...



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