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12

First three octets in a MAC address uniquely identify the manufacturer of the device. Udev rules allow you to match any number of characters with an asterisk. Thus, you can write a generic rule that will match any device of a specific vendor: SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", ATTR{address}=="74:2f:68*", NAME="wlan0" Alternatively, you can stop matching on ...


1

ifconfig = Solaris ipconfig = Windows ip = Linux That I know, but am certainly open to additions and corrections.


0

I give up trying this. It is not working either with 16.04 LTS which is using 4.4 linux kernel. And on Windows 8.1 with proper driver ended with failed too. Here I am finally using BSD (OpenBSD, NetBSD, and another BSD-based) succesfully working. On BSD, it is mounted as ulpt0. It's a dead end trying on other Linux (Debian-based, Arch, RedHat, blabla). ...


1

Others have explained what they do, so I'll skip that. The point in dd having seperate bs and count argument is that bs controls how much is written at a time. Specifying really large values for bs will require a really large buffer in the program, and specifying values less than the block size of the device will be slow because the kernel has to build an ...


19

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=4096 count=4096 Q: why 4096 is particularly used for counter? This will zero out the first 16 MiB of the drive. 16 MiB is probably more than enough to nuke any "start of disk" structures while being small enough that it won't take very long. dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=512 count=4096 seek=$(expr blockdev --getsz ...


4

Those commands will overwrite your sda device with zeroes -- the first one will do the first 16MB (block size of 4096 and count of 4096 blocks) and the 2nd one will overwrite the last 2MB (512 block size with 4096 blocks) with zeroes. (it's not technically erasing, and that relates to my first point below.) (that was the part already mentioned in other ...


12

This will erase the first 4096*4096=16MB and last 512*4096=2MB of your hard drive, which contain important structures useful for recovery. I assume this code was posted maliciously. I've never encounter a situation where explicitly specifying a count other than 1 was useful. I have erased the first block if I wanted to ensure I wasn't leaving any traces of ...


0

With udev on, get your keyboard layout with: xkbcomp $DISPLAY mylayout.xkb Then you should be able to load it (once udev is off) by: xkbcomp -i <XInput_id> mylayout.xkb $DISPLAY where <XInput_id> can be found by xinput list or grep XINPUT /var/log/Xorg.0.log. References that may be of interest: this and that (not an exact duplicate).


2

Maybe I overlook something, but isn't this just a matter of adding the XF86MonBrightnessDown and XF86MonBrightnessUp to your xmodmap? xmodmap -e "keycode 101 = XF86MonBrightnessDown NoSymbol XF86MonBrightnessDown" for testing this temporarily. Similar for brightness up. If it works, you need to make this permanent depending on your display manager. LXDE ...


2

I've been ducking for the solution for a while and finally I've found a solution. It worked for me. I don't know what triggers this weird behaviour though. This is the recipe for shutting down your Debian: Run ps aux | grep suspend. One of the results should be looking like this root 3651 0.0 0.0 8668 1716 ? Ss 07:18 0:00 /lib/systemd/systemd-sleep ...


2

Add the following section: Section "ServerLayout" Identifier "Layout[all]" InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard" InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer" Option "AutoAddDevices" "off" EndSection To find the correct mouse and keyboard drivers, I suggest you inspect /var/log/Xorg.0.log before you turn udev off: you will see which driver it ...



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