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You could delve into this by looking for the MAC address with grep "08:00:27:9b:e5:49" /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/*, and the interface name itself. I'm guessing it gets configured along with something else. Note that those files are not mandatory, they're just conveniences. An interface could be configured without them.


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systemd-udevd listens to kernel uevents. For every event,systemd-udevd executes matching instructions specified in udev rules.May be you are frequently getting the kernel uevents and it is causing systemd-udevd to execute the instructions. Some tips: Check your udev rules in /etc/udev/ and try to update your initramfs.


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It looks like the ftdi_sio module is missing from that package. It does appear to be fixed in a later version, though. You can follow the instructions here to install a newer one.


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Well that led me to the easy answer: update-rc.d network-manager disable and then reboot. I had no idea NetworkManager was still running at all, but it was, and it was assigning the IP.


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As per this suggestion, (here) commented by @don_crissti I am providing solution that worked for me. Following is output of udevadm monitor --property while removing device (KERNEL lines are skipped and only last UDEV remove is attached below) UDEV [1380.287343] remove /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.7/usb1/1-4 (usb) ACTION=remove BUSNUM=001 ...


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Most likely, the command is executing but doesn't know where to display the output. I assume you are being logged in to X with a user other than root, and that rule is most likely being run as root. Try the following command: su - your_X_user_here -c 'export DISPLAY=:0;zenity --info' For running any Bash Script follow the command: su - your_X_user_here ...


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In my case, the issue is coming from the fact that the mac address for each interface was set in three files : /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1 We need consistency between ifcfg file and net.rules for the mac address.


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The /sys filesystem (sysfs) contains files that provide information about devices: whether it's powered on, the vendor name and model, what bus the device is plugged into, etc. It's of interest to applications that manage devices. The /dev filesystem contains files that allow programs to access the devices themselves: write data to a serial port, read a ...



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