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0

You could change the ownership of the folder by: sudo chown -R username:groupname /mount/mac/Desktop Replace username with your user-name.


0

It seems you have somehow made an incomplete config file for CT 101, namely /etc/vz/conf/101.conf. If you're confident you have nothing important in CT 101, you can just destroy it (or manually remove /etc/vz/conf/101.conf) then try again creating CT 101. vzctl destroy 101 vzctl create 101 --ostemplate centos-6-x86 And I must correct several ...


0

Try to login as root then comment out all /etc/fstab entries pointing to partitions from the failed data drive. It might be necessary to remount the / partition in read-write mode (if it's mounted read-only and you can't save the file the 1st time, re-try after remounting). When you log out the system will automatically reboot and should come up normally ...


1

looks like your using LVM, so you have to expand your current drive after you have resized it. check the following link. [resize on the fly] http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/features/resize-your-disks-on-the-fly-with-lvm


0

There was something (kind of) similar to your case. That case was (kind of or at least became a bit better) solved after uninstalling the game and Java package then reinstalling both. You may also consider checking for any update that might have been recently released by your VGA vendor.


0

You can create a user, set its home directory to /var/www/ and add him to the www-data group. If you want the files he will create belongs to the www-data group, you'll have to add the "s" bit to the www directory's mod. # useradd -m /var/www -g www-data # chmod g+s /var/www Or did I missunderstand the question? Maybe you want that this user can't read ...


1

Ubuntu provides specific repositories of nonfree software, and Canonical expressly promotes and recommends nonfree software under the Ubuntu name in some of their distribution channels. Ubuntu offers the option to install only free packages, which means it also offers the option to install nonfree packages too. In addition, the version of Linux, the kernel, ...


1

That motd output is all generated by running scripts in /etc/update-motd.d/ on every login. The dynamic motd feature in Ubuntu is governed by pam_motd (see update-motd manpage for details), so you need to enable PAM login to see it. Alternatively, you can call the scripts in the system wide shell profile. Note that you'd better not use run-parts because ...


2

Pip for Python 3 The Python 3 version of pip is pip3 so you would run: pip3 install <package-name> In general, you can run dpkg with the -L, --list option to see what files are in an installed package: dpkg -L python3-pip I just installed python3-pip to verify this and one of the files listed is /usr/bin/pip3. The two versions of Python can ...


1

Try sudo apt-get remove libreoffice first. After upgrading, re-install libreoffice.


0

For me the solution was different. I used the command aptitude, when the graphical menu appeared I used / to get a pop-up search field and find all the linux-header, linux-image, linux-server versions and removed all but the one currently not used by pressing -. To find the current kernel version I used uname -r. Finally I installed a newer version of ...


0

The best solution for this, is to use dd like this dd if=/path/to/debian.iso of=/dev/sdc Is necessary to burn the image to the entire usb and not just the first partition, sdc, not sdc1.


0

In CCSM (Compiz Config Settings Manager), there is the "Rotate Cube". You can change the KeyBindings there, as shown in the screenshot: As shown in the screenshot, I customized them to F1, F2, F3, F4 and they work perfectly fine. Using Viewport Switcher If you do not wish to use "Rotate Cube" and wish to use the good old Viewport Switcher, then first ...


0

Install local DNS server, enabling root zone lookup. The issue you're expecting can occur if the ISP is doing something wrong or in case of netlink faults. Just remember to enable root zone of type "hint"! and add 127.0.0.1 as your first nameserver in resolv.conf . It's not the fastest solution, but if your connectivity by-ip-address is unbreakable - it will ...


0

In vim there's various ways to copy/paste. (In the enumeration below I'm just showing the three variants using first marking the text then copy/pasting.) Select a range of whole lines: type V, move to end of range, type y. Then go to the target position and use p to print the text below the current line or use P to print it above. Select a range of text ...


0

I'd suggest caution if you want to use Debian on the desktop. They don't seem to have the resources necessary to provide QA on the desktop side. For the past couple of years installing Debian Desktop leaves you without notifications for security updates. https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=678340#22 ...


0

Install tuptime, since that moment, you will have a track of the system uptime. https://github.com/rfrail3/tuptime


0

I use Ubuntu and a very close friend uses Debian. We both run pretty much the same packages. He is forever calling me to help him out of crises. Granted the silly things he has problems with most Debian users would not. He calls me because I have been successful in helping him when he accidentally crashed his entire system and I recovered it for him. No... ...


0

You would need someone to precompile source of all packages and get .debs ready for you (the Debian binary packages for Linux kernels won't work for FreeBSD kernels), and recompiling/porting is not always trivial. Ubuntu doesn't have those precompiled binaries, so I think the simple answer is "no -- at least not without a team of very competent developers". ...


0

open a terminal and execute the following commands: sudo ufw allow out 53 sudo ufw disable; sudo ufw enable echo "nameserver 8.8.4.4" | sudo tee /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base echo "nameserver 8.8.8.8" | sudo tee -a /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base sudo resolvconf -u EDIT: Another way you can set the nameserver is through dhclient: echo ...


1

edit /etc/resolv.conf ; add, nameserver ip.ad.dr.es lines. You are supposed to add a nameserver or two for failover. Usually you'd use nameservers that your ISP provides, but using 4.4.2.2 and similar is ok if you want to give them your browsing habits


-1

Try remove it then re-install: apt-get install python-capstone


0

I got it working with the help of a workaround. Possibly there is an error related to the path of some files which are starting with a :/. I guess that's related to some relict's of the Windows version. After trying rosmake lsd_slam you can edit the CMakeCache.txt-file to remove these colons by using: cat CMakeCache.txt | sed s/":\/"/"\/"/g > ...


0

Most importantly you should have permissions to do so. Most of the problem like cannot start process or cannot find some file are due to permissions. Use sudo before any command. Now for ssh you can simply do sudo stop ssh sudo start ssh This leverages upstart


1

The sequence of commands you give clones the grub repository, changes the current directory to that newly created by git (cd grub), builds grub, changes the directory to grub-core, and runs the grub-mkimage executable which is in the parent directory. More explicitly, if you start off in your home directory (I'll imagine it's /home/evan): git clone ... ...


1

The $HOME environment variable is commonly set and exported by login to the pathname of a user's home directory when a user logs in. A POSIX-compatible shell will use the value of this environment variable in a context when it should perform a ~ tilde expansion to complete a path to a username's home directory but the actual expanded field is otherwise null. ...


0

A simple GUI method: Right-click Menu and then click Configure. Click Open the Menu Editor. Optionally create a new folder for your custom links. Create a new item that opens the file, using the command, evince /path/to/file.pdf, or whichever PDF viewer you want to use. Close the menu editor and right-click on your new menu item, selecting Add to ...


2

In shell, user's home directory is located in /home/username, ~ is shortcut for home directory of the current user using the shell, ~usr is shortcut for home directory of user with username usr, so ~usr is the same as /home/usr. If your username is usr, then ~ and ~usr are the same. The home directory of current user is also saved in variable $HOME.


6

Whatever you're saying about ~$, home$, and /home$ doesn't make much sense.  I guess you're talking about your command line prompt; if so, it would have been useful to show what you typed and what happened (and then explained what you expected). But I can read minds, so I believe that I understand the issue: ~ and ~user239887 (assuming user239887 is your ...


1

You'll have a hard time building such an old version of gcc on a modern system... The errors you've copied are from texinfo, which is no longer compatible with the documentation included in gcc 2.95. You can try installing binaries straight from http://snapshot.debian.org/package/gcc-2.95/2.95.4.ds15-27/; installing cpp-2.95 and gcc-2.95 from there will ...


0

You will need to compile the older version of gcc from source and give it a different destination directory with the prefix option. ./configure --prefix=/usr/local/gcc I think the gcc configure will allow you to use your existing /etc. ./configure --prefix=/usr/local/gcc --sysconfdir=/etc


2

Use lsblk to list block devices. It's likely that '/dev/sr0' is a read-only-media (rom) device. That should be what you seek.


1

I have an experimental workaround. First get adapter sink name First one has to figure out the sink name for the adapter. Open a shell. We'll assume bash and prevent any localization issue by switching to the default locale: export LC_ALL=C To get a list of sinks: pacmd list-sinks | grep name: You can read the output and copy-paste manually the ...


1

Had the same problem, and your answer pointed me in the right direction. I found a different solution which does not require editing the apparmor configuration. Instead of using a symlink to redirect access to /home, use the bind option on mount. I added the following line to /etc/fstab: /elsewhere/home /home none bind Once you do this, apparmor won't ...


1

I ended up solving it myself (kind of). It's not the ultimate way, but it's a workaround that I can live with myself. Essentially, I took the original sources of the DMZ-Cursors package and created a fork of DMZ-Black, then I removed the 32x32 and 42x42 images, and am now using that as my cursor set. For convenience sake, I've put up my version of ...


0

For me (Debian sid/stretch), the udev $id attribute is empty when I plug in my USB device. It is $kernel that contains the necessary string to pass to USBHID's unbind. Here are the udev rules that I'm using: SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="0000", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0000", MODE="0660", GROUP="plugdev" ATTRS{idVendor}=="0000", ATTRS{idProduct}=="0000", ...


0

In the random moments of the time segmentation faults are happened and processes shut down. What can I do to avoid that? Indeed, this is also my experience when trying to run standard Ubuntu off of a USB flash drive. Some drives can take it, others can't, presumably due to firmware bugs. Try with a less-hardcorely-efficient drive.


1

Edit your python program and let it check for a 'do not run' file first. If such file exists, exit your program i.e. import os.path if os.path.isfile('/tmp/disable_mypython'): exit() If you check for a file called for instance /tmp/disable_mypython you can easily 'disable' your program using: touch /tmp/disable_mypython and enable it again using: rm ...


3

Generally, stopping and starting the system cron daemon is a bad idea. Commenting out the line isn't always convenient so here are a couple of related alternatives Use a semaphore One solution to this requirement is to use a semaphore - or flag - to indicate whether or not the script is permitted to run. In this instance the semaphore can be represented by ...


1

The simpliest method I can think of is just to edit crontab and comment out the cronjob. Open crontab with: crontab -e And comment out # the line which is your cronjob.


1

Don't kill the cron daemon as it does a lot of tasks which are necessary to the system. Instead, edit the crontab file and comment out the cron job related to your script. (FYI, you do not need to restart the cron daemon after editing that.)


0

While Ubuntu's default AltF2 is pretty useful, I've noticed in the comments that it does not work for you. An alternative run dialog that you can use is bbrun. This run dialog is originally for black box desktop environment, but can still be used elsewhere. Install it using sudo apt-get install bbrun. Once you do, run it in terminal with nohup bbrun & ...


2

Try pressing Alt+F2. I'm not totally sure about this though, as when I search Alt+F2 in LXDE on Google there seem to be a fair number of results about a bug. Not sure if those still apply. However, this is the shortcut that worked for me last time I used LXDE.


1

You probably have unused kernels in /boot. Generally you only need at most two kernels there: the one you're currently running, and the one that you're installing. Once you've upgraded to a new kernel and you've rebooted to it and you know it works, you can remove older kernels. The packaging system tends to err on the side of caution and risks filling up ...


0

If you uninstall the desktop packages and install the server packages through tasksel, you should be prepared to do a LOT of reconfiguration, as this will remove your network settings, wireless card drivers, etc. If all you need to do is get rid of the gui, follow steps 1-2 from the first answer. It's up to you whether or not to purge the GUI completely. I ...


1

Simplified: your host sends ARP requests for "who has host2.lan"; when it doesn't receive any response, it sends an "echo-request for host2.lan" to its gateway (presumably host1.lan); the gateway answers with a host-unreachable; when host2.lan wakes up it replies to the ARP requests, and gets registered in the ARP tables on all machines in your LAN; your ...


1

I doubt ping is printing the wrong IP address—I'm pretty sure it'll print what's actually in the packet. I'd suggest tcpdump/wireshark to investigate further. Things that come to mind: Firewall NAT rules. On both the machine you're pinging from, the machine you're pinging, and (especially if its a hop between you and to host2!) host1. DNS confusion. Your ...


-1

You can try to use sudo su And after that you can try /etc/init.d/sphinxsearch start If this won't work you should comment on me


0

Update your cursor theme and cursor size first of all First in a terminal type: sudo update-alternatives --config x-cursor-theme Choose the number of the theme you want - e.g. 0 for DMZ-White Reboot your system. Using dconf-editor (install using sudo apt-get install dconf-tools) navigate to org.gnome.desktop.interface change the cursor size to ...


2

I think the best advice is just in this forum post. Here are your options (2 and 3 are more-or-less the same in terms of effect, really): Use a package manager and a repository. That means you get updates, you get official releases, signed releases, etc. etc. etc. If you can't or won't use a package from a repository, build a package for the software and ...



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