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6

Whatever you're saying about ~$, home$, and /home$ doesn't make much sense.  I guess you're talking about your command line prompt; if so, it would have been useful to show what you typed and what happened (and then explained what you expected). But I can read minds, so I believe that I understand the issue: ~ and ~user239887 (assuming user239887 is your ...


3

Generally, stopping and starting the system cron daemon is a bad idea. Commenting out the line isn't always convenient so here are a couple of related alternatives Use a semaphore One solution to this requirement is to use a semaphore - or flag - to indicate whether or not the script is permitted to run. In this instance the semaphore can be represented by ...


2

Use lsblk to list block devices. It's likely that '/dev/sr0' is a read-only-media (rom) device. That should be what you seek.


2

In shell, user's home directory is located in /home/username, ~ is shortcut for home directory of the current user using the shell, ~usr is shortcut for home directory of user with username usr, so ~usr is the same as /home/usr. If your username is usr, then ~ and ~usr are the same. The home directory of current user is also saved in variable $HOME.


1

The sequence of commands you give clones the grub repository, changes the current directory to that newly created by git (cd grub), builds grub, changes the directory to grub-core, and runs the grub-mkimage executable which is in the parent directory. More explicitly, if you start off in your home directory (I'll imagine it's /home/evan): git clone ... ...


1

The $HOME environment variable is commonly set and exported by login to the pathname of a user's home directory when a user logs in. A POSIX-compatible shell will use the value of this environment variable in a context when it should perform a ~ tilde expansion to complete a path to a username's home directory but the actual expanded field is otherwise null. ...


1

You'll have a hard time building such an old version of gcc on a modern system... The errors you've copied are from texinfo, which is no longer compatible with the documentation included in gcc 2.95. You can try installing binaries straight from http://snapshot.debian.org/package/gcc-2.95/2.95.4.ds15-27/; installing cpp-2.95 and gcc-2.95 from there will ...


1

I have an experimental workaround. First get adapter sink name First one has to figure out the sink name for the adapter. Open a shell. We'll assume bash and prevent any localization issue by switching to the default locale: export LC_ALL=C To get a list of sinks: pacmd list-sinks | grep name: You can read the output and copy-paste manually the ...


1

Edit your python program and let it check for a 'do not run' file first. If such file exists, exit your program i.e. import os.path if os.path.isfile('/tmp/disable_mypython'): exit() If you check for a file called for instance /tmp/disable_mypython you can easily 'disable' your program using: touch /tmp/disable_mypython and enable it again using: rm ...


1

The simpliest method I can think of is just to edit crontab and comment out the cronjob. Open crontab with: crontab -e And comment out # the line which is your cronjob.


1

Don't kill the cron daemon as it does a lot of tasks which are necessary to the system. Instead, edit the crontab file and comment out the cron job related to your script. (FYI, you do not need to restart the cron daemon after editing that.)


1

I ended up solving it myself (kind of). It's not the ultimate way, but it's a workaround that I can live with myself. Essentially, I took the original sources of the DMZ-Cursors package and created a fork of DMZ-Black, then I removed the 32x32 and 42x42 images, and am now using that as my cursor set. For convenience sake, I've put up my version of ...


1

Had the same problem, and your answer pointed me in the right direction. I found a different solution which does not require editing the apparmor configuration. Instead of using a symlink to redirect access to /home, use the bind option on mount. I added the following line to /etc/fstab: /elsewhere/home /home none bind Once you do this, apparmor won't ...



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