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8

I think this should do it: tar -xzf file.tar.gz -C ~/locationX folder1 -C ~/locationY folder2 The -C option means to change to the specified directory before doing the extraction. Specifying filename arguments after the tarfile name restricts the extraction to just those files or directories. And you can repeat this -Changing directories as you do. Note ...


5

A filesystem goes into read-only mode when it has consistency issues. It is a way to prevent possible data corruption. Your next would be to take a backup of all important data from this drive since this could also mean that the hard-drive could be on its way out. When you rebooted the machine, the / partition got mounted back in the regular rw mode from ...


4

This script will not run correctly at boot time as gnome-terminal, firefox and gedit will expect a X session to be running. The init.d and/or systemd route is too early in the boot process for your requirements. You'd be better off creating a .desktop file and configuring your system to auto-start this on login. Create a the file as follows:- $ gedit ...


3

With GNU xargs: xargs -d '\n' mkdir -p -- < foo.txt xargs will run as few mkdir commands as possible. With standard syntax: (export LC_ALL=C sed 's/[[:blank:]"\'\'']/\\&/g' < foo.txt | xargs mkdir -p --) Where it's not efficient is that mkdir -p a/b/c will attempt some mkdir("a") and possibly stat("a") and chdir("a") and same for "a/b" even ...


2

You can have multiple connections without a problem. Each connection will have its own shell. In the future you may want to start the script with nohup and background the script. This will allow the script to continue to run, even if you loose your shell. Also you can continue to use your existing shell without needing to open a new connection nohup ...


2

Your caracteristics are way too restrictive. The key notion here is: a daemon is a background process, therefore it cannot be the controlling process of a terminal, nor can it have a controlling terminal. This simple "rule" allows daemons to survive across terminals open/close and users login/logout. Each terminal has a controlling session, that is, a set ...


1

To remove inkscape and all its settings do: sudo apt-get remove --purge inkscape If this dosn't work look in your home folder, show hidden files, look for ~/.config/inkscape that folder should contain your users settings so you can transfer and/or delete those settings.


1

No, it won't log you off. Linux (and pretty much any UNIX-like OS) is a multi-user, multi-session environment, so in your example,you'll have two independent user sessions.



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