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3

The term backporting means (by definition) rebuilding existing packaging on an earlier version of the system. Why is that "backporting process does not consider upstream releases"? Packaging a previously unpackaged software release is not backporting. What is the advantage of downstream release over upstream ones for backporting? I'm not ...


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There are at least two mistakes in your cron script: First, you should do a set -e at the beginning so that any error will end the script immediately. Moreover since you are using relative pathnames, you should do a cd to the wanted working directory: cd /home/nalangi Note. The cron(8) man page says: When executing commands, any output is mailed to ...


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Unfortunately Ubuntu for Android has been halted by now or at least until Canonical finds a suitable partner to bring it to phones. Maybe we'll finally see this becoming a reality with the 64bit smartphones on the horizon. Direct quote from Canonical: We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The ...


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apt-get source is extremely useful if you want to customize a package. Distributions already make several customizations (small if the package is already well-behaved) to every package in order to make it fit. If you encounter a bug or want to add a feature to some program you're using, you shouldn't have to give up all bugfixes, features, and system ...


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$HOME/.vnc/xstartup is for the X desktop running in the server, not for the server itself. You need to create a $HOME/.vncrc file with: $geometry = "1400x850"; in it. You have some documentation in: /usr/share/doc/vnc4server/examples/vnc.conf.gz


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If you are not writing your own software but want to start/stop existing service, than like @jasonwryan wrote, RHEL/Fedora are using systemd. The command for handling services is systemctl. systemctl start/stop/restart servicename If you want to list the installed services, use: systemctl list-units


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I think you are mixing things called tar-balls (when referring to multiple folders), with regular installation packages (files ending in .deb on Debian/Ubuntu and in .rpm on Red Hat/Fedora/SuSE). The former is "only" a, often compressed, directory structure with some instruction (in the form of scripts, Makefiles, configuration files) to get the files ...


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Since your server has no GUI you're working with a simple CLI terminal and there's no X server running. I guess there are various X commands on your HD in case you do want to run X. OTOH, it's weird that $TERM is xterm... Anyway, I've never played with this stuff myself, but you should be able to customize your terminal's palette. Have a look at setcolors ...


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I would think of something like this: watch -n0.1 "sensors | grep 'temp1\|temp2\|Core 0'" Which would start outputting the temp1, temp2 and core 0 rows. With that maybe you can have like a small terminal on a corner or something, checking the information out. You could also include information from hddtemp so you have both, CPU temp and HDD temp.


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Even with latest firmware and driver updates the server didn't make a TCP connection, but the problem was solved changing the motherboard. An IBM technician changed the motherboard and it started to work properly. Really weird problem.


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Here is a full explanation I wrote about how to get Ubuntu (all releases) working with Spacewalk. Also with full Errata support http://www.devops-blog.net/spacewalk/registering-ubuntu-and-debian-servers-with-spacewalk



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