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1

It's hard to say exactly what causes this. Unfortunately, Linux serial ports do not make timing guarantees, and normal UART protocols aren't supposed to have tight timing requirements like this. If your protocol requires this kind of timing guarantee, you're going to have to dig into your kernel drivers, and perhaps write your own driver that guarantees ...


-1

users=$(who | awk '{print $1}') for user in $users<br> do DISPLAY=:0 sudo -u $user notify-send "hello!!" done


1

Yes, a program running over SSH will depend on its output going somewhere. If the connection is slow, the output must be buffered somewhere, and buffers cannot be infinite, so the program must block if they are filled. Note that the output might not necessarily go to a terminal: consider running something like ssh user@somewhere "cat file.txt" > ...


9

An SSH connection can die prematurely if the underlying TCP connection receives a packet with the RST flag. That could happen if one side sends a packet (which might be a periodic SSH keepalive probe) but doesn't receive a TCP acknowledgement in a reasonable amount of time, or if a router decides that the connection has been idle too long, or if an ISP is ...


23

The output of programs is buffered, so if the connection is slow the program will be halted if the buffer fills up. If you use screen, it has a buffer as well that it uses to try and display to a connected session. But a program connected in the screen session will not be stopped if screen cannot update the remote terminal fast enough. Just like when a ...


0

Hey everyone I got solution luckyly by bit roaming in file manager. I got file namely bash.bashrc in /etc. I viewed and found PS1 so I edited that with "/@" and it changed to current time.


0

Include the line PS1="/@" in /root/.bashrc. This is the shell configuration file for the root user. Please note that it is unwise to log in as root. You should have good reasons if you are not following the points from the post installation guide, AKA General Recommendations.


1

SystemTap 3 lines, problem solved, SystemTap completely rules: Install SystemTap, create ptysnoop file: #!/usr/bin/stap probe kernel.function("pty_write") { if (kernel_string($tty->name) == @1) { printf("%s", kernel_string_n($buf, $c)) } } Make it executable. Now to watch /dev/pts/6 you just: $ sudo ptysnoop pts6 Edit: other ...


1

You can specify multiple file descriptors for peekfd. e.g. peekfd -n -8 -d -c 24184 0 1 2 will snoop on stdin, stdout, and stderr of pid 24184. The -c option will also attach to any child processes. This is necessary in order to see the ouput from them (e.g. seeing the output of ls that has been run in a snooped-on shell process) Strangely, I find ...


1

The gpg-agent man page explains under the option --enable-ssh-support that the ssh agent protocol is not able to provide the name of the tty to the agent, so it defaults to using the original terminal it was started in. Before running the ssh command that requires a passphrase in a new terminal you need to type gpg-connect-agent updatestartuptty /bye in ...



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