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It's an efficiency measure. The CPU runs so much faster than the serial port that if the kernel let the userspace process run every time there was a little bit of room in the buffer, it would end up making a trip to userspace and back for every single byte of data. That's very wasteful of CPU time: $ time dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null bs=1 count=10000000 ...


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There is no standard way to ask about control-backspace. The conventional way to ask about the backspace key is in the terminal database, e.g., look at the output of tput kbs If your terminal is configured to match the TERM value, that gives the "backspace" key. Some terminals (originally rxvt, later xterm and now "several" undocumented) implement ...


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There are many possible solutions for that: You can configure sudo not to require tty: RequireTTY in /etc/sudoers You can force tty allocation on command-line in these specific cases, where you need it: ssh -tt host command You can tell scp not to allocate TTY by -T or -o RequestTTY=no command-line option: scp -T file host:path/ or scp -o RequestTTY=no ...


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SCP protocol is binary one. With TTY enabled, the control characters have their meaning. So as soon as the TTY sees a character in the SCP protocol binary data that appears as a control character, it interprets it. Particularly as soon as there's ^C (ASCII 0x03), it aborts the SCP process. Use ssh -t to force TTY for interactive sessions, instead of ...


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Solution That I Have Settled With This issue still plagues me somewhat, but I have mashed together a multi-pronged solution that gets very close to what the original question was seeking, to the point that I am marking this issue "resolved". 1.) Remove the xorg.conf changes These changes to xorg.conf from the OP can be removed, as the functionality will ...


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Running dmesg -w (follow mode) shows the contents of the message buffer and waits for new messages. To get an effect similar to the virtual consoles, i.e. a terminal you can continue working in but where kernel activity is printed out regardless of anything else that's happening, you can run that command in the background dmesg -w & If your dmesg ...


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reset has its place, but clears your screen. If you are running xterm or anything compatible, the shortest, least intrusive thing to use would be printf '\033[?9l' That is not explicitly stated in the Mouse Tracking section of XTerm Control Sequences, but xterm allows you to reset (disable) mouse mode by turning off any of the possible modes that might be ...


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You could try setting TERM=dumb, which might work — if wineconsole does not insist on making a full-screen display. If not, as noted, script is part of the solution. That lets you run your program, transparently collecting all of the data sent to the screen in a text file. Making sense of it is the rest of the solution. If wineconsole simply writes ...



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