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9

I think, general principles of network troubleshooting are: Find out at what level of TCP/IP stack(or some other stack) occurs the problem. Understand what is the correct system behavior, and what is deviation from normal system state Try to express the problem in one sentence or in several words Using obtained information from buggy system, your own ...


8

To the first point: USB1.1 was a lot slower than USB2.0, in most cirumstances. Note that devices can still connect at the lower 1.1 speed of 12Mbps instead of the faster 480Mbps, but usually when this occurs it's either because the port is autonegotiating low or it is because one of the two devices is really 1.1. Try disconnecting and reconnecting if you ...


8

The methods will depend on the kind of the problem. In general "How To Ask Questions The Smart Way" by Eric S. Raymond and Rick Moen is sometimes a helpful advice to focus on the problem and to check if you have thought about important parts of the problem. Your first source of information during debugging are the logfiles your system/application writes. ...


8

If the screen and input devices (keyboard and mouse or trackpad) froze, the first place to start by looking would be in /var/log/Xorg.0.log (assuming that Xorg is running on the first display server). If that doesn't yield any immediate clues, the next logs to check would be /var/log/messages.log and /var/log/dmesg.log. If you are unable to find anything ...


8

Well, you can recover from the permissions problem by booting a live CD/DVD/USB-drive, mounting your root filesystem (in a subdirectory), and running the chmod command there. SystemRescueCd is a distribution designed especially for this sort of repair, but any live CD that can handle your root filesystem will work. But if your server has been compromised, ...


6

I suggest using a different testing method. hdparm is a bit weird as it gives device addresses rather than filesystem addresses, and it doesn't say which device those addresses relate to (e.g. it resolves partitions, but not devicemapper targets, etc.). Much easier to use something that sticks with filesystem addresses, that way it's consistent (maybe except ...


5

I found the answer from this thread (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2114055) over at ubuntuforums.org. It seems with newer Gigabyte mainboards (at least) there is a BIOS option called IOMMU Controller that is disabled by default and gives no clue or indication as to what it is for. Enabling this setting and rebooting "magically" restores all my ...


5

If you look at these lines in your top output: Mem: 1016284k total, 1008232k used, 8052k free, 580k buffers Swap: 2096440k total, 2095168k used, 1272k free, 9872k cached you've run out of both RAM and swap. I suspect if you watch vmstat 10 output, you'll see the machine is dying from thrashing. A machine running MySQL and Apache ...


5

UPDATE So, I really didn't think I would be researching NTFS this morning, but, thanks mostly to @AndrewMedico's comments below, I learned something. The truth is file streams are weird, and they confuse me, but apparently it gets deeper. Behaving in a way very like NTFS file streams, Transactional NTFS commits file changes to some alternate cache until ...


4

For me this sounds most likely that your graphics card drivers are not installed correctly. Could this be a possibility ? Because then GNOME would start in "Fallback mode" which looks most likely like Gnome2. Check /var/log/gdm3/:0.log and /var/log/Xorg.0.log for errors, particularly stemming from the graphics card driver.


4

Sounds like a hardware problem. Have you added anything to the system? E.g. RAM, new GPU, HDD, PCI cards? Physical: Check all cables. Check mounting of RAM. Check mounting of all PCI's. Remount CPU (If nothing else works). Check powercables, both external and internal. [Edit]: And as pointed out by @vonbrand Ensure the cooling etc. and do a cleanup ...


4

It seems the problem was incorrect mapping of the hard disk. If the USB was plugged in during boot, hard disk was recognized as hd1; but if there wasn't the USB, it was recognized as hd0. Fixed the problem by changing grub.conf to use hd0.


4

The preferred way is via apt: apt-get install --reinstall packageNameGoesHere


4

You should compare the following file between your account and an account for which printing works: ~/.config/evince/print-settings (and/or backup your copy and replace with one from another user). If that doesn't help you might try to replace the whole ~/.config/evince directory.


3

If you want a single, general principle for debugging, it would be this: Understand how the system works, as much as you can. Understand each component of the system, and the failure modes of each component. Be aware of which components you have changed recently, and which components may have changed or failed on their own. If you were looking for ...


3

Boot into single-user mode by pressing 'a' at the grub menu, and then adding " single" to the command line and pressing ENTER. Then go through and individually start the services on your usual runlevel (which defaults to runlevel 5). You can do this by executing in turn, with the argument start, each file starting with "S" in /etc/rc5.d (they should all be ...


3

The xev output shows a KeyPress event for the Alt_L key with state 0x400. The state indicates which key modifiers and mouse buttons are down immediately before the event, e.g. state 0x1 would indicate that Shift was down, state 0x4 that Control was down, etc. state 0x400 indicates that Button3 (the right mouse button) is down. What's happening is that your ...


3

You don't say in your question but are you able to print using other applications? The command line? I'd confirm that you're printer is still configured and working correctly by doing the following: 1. confirm that printer is setup and accessible using: lpq # check for jobs on the default printer % lpq mfc-8480dn is ready no entries # check for any jobs ...


3

This happened to me too. I checked the ".xsession-errors" log on my home and it pointed to a permissions issue on $HOME/.cache/dconf/user, which I changed to be owned by my user and that fixed the problem. I hope this helps.


3

Your test routine is wrong—you're getting sector numbers relative to the block device which the filesystem sits on—which in this case, is a logical volume. The logical volume, of course, does not start at the first sector of the physical volume (and may not even be contiguous). Even if the logical volume started at sector 0 of the physical volume (which it ...


3

Double checking the configuration This is the first thing you want to make sure is correct. It is also the one most likely responsible for any errors. Yes, there are bugs in any software, but things like su are so used so much, that it is much more likely that you have misconfigured your system, than that there is a bug in the code. checking system logs ...


2

first, try reseat the card next check if you have the correct driver installed # lscfg -vpl ent0 should display something like this ent0 U0.1-P2-I1/E1 Gigabit Ethernet-SX PCI-X Adapter (14106802) Gigabit Ethernet-SX PCI-X Adapter: Part Number.................00P3055 FRU Number..................00P3055 EC Level....................H11634A ...


2

A surprising number of "network problems" boil down to DNS problems of one kind or another. Initial troubleshooting should use ping -n w.x.y.z in order to leave out DNS resolution of a hostname, and just check IP connectivity. After that, use route -n to check the default IP route without DNS resolution. After verifying IP connectivity, and routing, ...


2

The only definitive way is to try them one by one. But there's a good chance that the bind mounts are triggered explicitly from one of the init scripts, so simply searching them is likely to provide the culprit. And of course you should check /etc/fstab first. grep bind /etc/fstab grep 'mount.*bind' /etc/rc*/* (The location of init script may be different ...


2

The "Killed" message isn't coming from rm or cp, rather it's coming from the shell telling you that the process was forcibly terminated with signal 9. The usual reason this happens is that the operating system is running low on memory and swap space and has no choice but to randomly kill processes to free up RAM.


2

As long as you don't have root, you can't test all of the memory. There are several programs out there for testing the memory, but I suspect most or all of them require root access. What you could try is to generate a large file with random data, the size of your ramdisk, run a checksum like sha1, copy it over and then compare the checksum. Repeat this ...


2

An update to the packages on your system could've led to having a file under /etc/profile.d being upgraded/replaced, which would be causing the variable $LANG to now be gone. I'd start by taking a look for any .rpmsave files which RPM will typically create when it needs to replace a file as part of an update. These would show up in your /etc directory or a ...


2

Scan codes are the same on all PC keyboards (except that there is variation with multimedia keys). They are determined by the position of the key, not by the labels on the keys (in fact the labels on the keys have no relationship whatsoever with the electric signals sent by the keyboard). So for a German (QWERTZ) keyboard, simply swap y and z. hdparm ...


1

Kill the console-kit-daemon process if it's still running. Remove the file /usr/share/dbus-1/system-service /org.freedesktop.ConsoleKit.service (or move it to some place where you could restore it, if necessary). Reboot and you will see that console-kit-daemon no longer automatically starts up.


1

You are using BusyBox' umount, presumably that one doesn't understand encfs specific flags (and its mount might also do things wrong). Does the encfs package include mount/unmount programs? Better use those. Perhaps you need to build a BusyBox with encfs support?



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