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6

Short answer Yes it is possible, use tsocks nmap -sT IP Long answer First of all Tor doesn't use privoxy, Tor provides an socks proxy for connecting via the Tor network. This means you won't see any network routes or things like that on your system but you have to configure your applications to use the Tor socks proxy to connect via Tor. Typical Tor ...


4

First, you need tun2socks (often a part of the 'badvpn' package). tun2socks sets up a virtual interface which you can route traffic through, and that traffic will get sent through the target socks proxy. Setting it up gets a little tricky as you only want to route certain traffic through the tunnel. This script should do what you want: #!/bin/bash ...


3

Depending on which browser you are using, using a proxy auto-config file might work best. Most modern browsers will support this. Something like this should be a good start: function FindProxyForURL(url, host) { isp = "PROXY ip_address:port; DIRECT"; tor = "SOCKS 127.0.0.1:9050"; if (shExpMatch(host,"*.onion")) { return tor; } ...


2

Keep in mind that: Tor clients switch virtual circuits every 10 minutes or so to my current understanding. This means the source IP is changing around that time frame. You are unlikely to prevent any behavior you deem malicious for longer than that duration. Note that the fact that Tor only proxies TCP traffic and not any other protocol limits abuse ...


2

You can't have your cake and eat it. Your ISP carries the network traffic from your computer to the server, so it has to know which host the traffic is going to. Note that if you use HTTPS, the ISP knows which host you're connecting to, it doesn't see the rest of the URL. If you don't want your ISP to know which server you're connecting to, you need to ...


2

Try Tor's obfsproxy. It was specifically designed for this kind of usecases. It obfuscates the traffic between the client and a Tor bridge in a way, that - in theory - it becomes indistinguishable from gibberish. At least it shouldn't be triggered as Tor- or SSL-traffic. https://www.torproject.org/projects/obfsproxy.html.en


2

You can block all outgoing network traffic for one user using the iptables owner module: iptables -A OUTPUT -m owner --uid-owner <username> -j DROP Note that this will block on all interfaces. If you want to use a specific interface, use -o <interface>. You could also consider setting up another machine as the gateway to the network, and then ...


1

Can I configure the TOR Browser which comes with Whonix to use a proxy, so that it becomes an extra hop after the TOR exit node? Yes. Connecting as follows: Browser(workstation) > TOR(gateway) > exit node > proxy Or in other words: user -> Tor -> Proxy -> Destination In contrast to the Tor Browser Bundle which connects to TOR via 127.0.0.1 ...


1

I have set the LD_PRELOAD manually to libtsocks.so and worked good, I think this may be a bug. export LD_PRELOAD='libtsocks.so'


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We're just talking about manipulating the "HTTP_PROXY" environment variable, right? Depending on what GUI/OS you're using (you didn't mention), there are many ways to set an environment variable. For example, in Ubuntu/gnome (and maybe others) you could make browser shortcuts for each setting of the variable, as described here under "Launching desktop ...


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What you're describing is a tor middlebox. There seems to already be documentation on how to do this. http://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-set-up-a-tor-middlebox-routing-all-virtualbox-virtual-machine-traffic-over-the-tor-network This might be different depending on what network manager you use.


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The rule that takes care of the packets after the first ACK is: iptables -A OUTPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT It essentially means: let all packets that are part of, or related to, an established session go through. All packets from your machine that follow the initial SYN (provided there was a valid reply to that) are part of an ...


1

It will be harder than usual to prevent these attacks since the source IP is not constant. However, to my knowledge the routes in tor are only changed every few minutes or so. So you could still deploy some of the standard limitation/filtering rules but with a higher threshold, since you must assume there is a whole network behind your source IPs. You can ...


1

Services are usually meant to run as root. However, you have 2 options: You have some sort of script that launches the service as that user. There are a few ways to accomplish this. You could do the following: sudo -u debian-tor /etc/init.d/service and then add debian-tor to the sudoer's file for this command You can use the stop-start-daemon with the ...



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