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I'm impressed about how richfully formatted and detailed the answers (and the question!) are. While they provide valuable info and solutions about the tools you mentioned, they provide very little insight about what the heck is going on, and, most importantly, why things are (somewhat) working for some tools when they supposedly should not. So here's some ...


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You can achieve this by making tmux run these as shell commands, with the run-shell (aliased to run) instruction and some additional quoting: bind B run "tmux capture-pane -S -999000; tmux save-buffer ~/.tmux/buffers/\"$(date +%d%m%y)\"" This will save your buffer output as ~/.tmux/buffers/240115. You can obviously customize the date command to deliver the ...


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If the problem is that the output from your bash script is getting lost, then you can win the battle with redirection: echo "\ePtmux;\e\e]9;foobar\007\e\" > /dev/tty However, I suspect the real problem is that you should be using echo -e so that bash processes the escape sequences in your string.


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By default, tmux spawns a login shell for all new windows. This would then source your ~/.zprofile or wherever your start your ssh-agent. As man tmux makes clear, you can avoid this behaviour by explicitly setting a default command in your ~/.tmux.conf: default-command shell-command Set the command used for new windows (if not ...


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The reason is that in your xterm, ^H is the erase character, and tmux apparently translates the erase character to the corresponding control character (^?) for the terminal it emulates, so that erasing works as expected in cooked mode (for instance, what happens when you just type cat). The translation is needed in case you use a terminal with ^? as the ...


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Check your tmux key bindings. Tmux - ArchWiki Tip: To mimic screen key bindings copy /usr/share/tmux/screen-keys.conf to either of the configuration locations.


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There is some palliative. I added keyboard shortcut to terminal (~/.bashrc), that draw some colored marker (actually, green line in my case). print_green_line() { echo "$(tput setaf 2)________________________________________$(tput sgr 0)" } bind -x '"\eG": print_green_line' # Alt+Shift+G After marker I start my long output command. Now, it's easy to ...


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This question is a bit old, but I was looking for something similar, and found it here. It creates a second session that shares windows with the first, but has its own view and cursor. tmux new-session -s alice tmux new-session -t alice -s bob If the sharing is happening between two user accounts, you may still have to mess with permissions (which it ...


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simply do this $ reset && tmux rename-window <new_window_name>


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No, this is not currently possible. The only thing you can do about this without restarting the server is to override the name manually when creating a new session by issuing tmux new -s 5, for example: $ tmux new -d -P 10: $ tmux ls 10: 1 windows (created Wed Jan 7 15:50:29 2015) [107x89] $ tmux new -s 5 -d -P 5: $ tmux ls 10: 1 windows (created Wed Jan ...


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Yes: try Ctrl+F3 and Ctrl+F4 t swap upper or lower panes. You can also iterate to reach other configurations.


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tmux already opens a shell for you in which it executes the cd and perl commands. If you don't want to run another shell under that, just so that you continue an interactive session (or prevent the window from closing, without using set-remain-on-exit), you can do: tmux new-window -t $SESSION:0 -k -n MAIN tmux send-keys 'cd ~/main/ && perl -Ilib ...


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Turns out you have to edit the key bindings for the emacs-copy table. Here's how I made the changes that I wanted above. First, I checked out what the current bindings were by entering the following command in tmux (by pressing Prefix+colon) list-keys -t emacs-copy. This gave me a list of the keys that were bound in emacs-copy mode and I looked through ...


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If naming your session is okay, then it's easy to do with the new-session command: tmux new-session -A -s main where main is the session name that will be attached to or created if needed. From man tmux The -A flag makes new-session behave like attach-session if session-name already exists; in the case, -D behaves like -d to attach-session.


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If screen does not work as well, make sure you have read-write access to /dev/ptmx. If not, no new pty can be spawned and especially tmux terminates without an error message.



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