New answers tagged

1

I was launching mutt by running tmux neww mutt. mutt was inheriting the environment set in tmux. This includes $GPG_TTY which is different for the new pane in which I'm running mutt (or unset if not in the tmux environment). I wrote a wrapper called gpgtty that sets $GPG_TTY correctly for new panes. #!/bin/sh GPG_TTY=$(tty) $* Then I launch mutt: tmux ...


0

If you're using this inside a .shrc file or similar with exec I'd recommend if tmux ls exec tmux attach else exec tmux fi


0

If you're using this inside a .shrc file or similar with exec I'd recommend if tmux ls exec tmux attach else exec tmux fi


1

It looks like tmux is doing the right thing for your example: For example, ctrl-shift-right passes as ^[[C (which is the same as the escape sequence of the right key), instead of ^[OC (outside tmux). because the usual connotation of that sequence is that it is the same as cursor-movement sent from the host. A zero parameter is the same as a missing ...


0

On top of what @cuonglm said, check for references to bash in your .tmux.conf. For example, I was using a typical integration for copying & pasting in iTerm on Mac: set-option -g default-command "reattach-to-user-namespace -l bash" ... which, to function properly with zsh had to be changed to: set-option -g default-command ...


2

Probably you cannot. xterm (and the programs which act like it) makes a distinction between mouse operations with/without the shift modifier: the unshifted operations can be programmed, i.e., an application can send an escape sequence telling xterm to send back escape sequences for each mouse click. the unshifted operations cannot be programmed in this ...


0

The solution I found was to simply bind Ctrl-P to Ctrl-O in tmux. Add this line in .tmux.conf: bind -n C-o send-keys C-p


1

I added this to my ~/.tmux.conf: set-option -g detach-on-destroy off When I destroy the last shell in a session, it switches to another active session. Once all sessions are closed, tmux exits.


-2

If tmux is version 1.7 or higher move-window -r or set-option -g renumber-windows on in .tmux.conf for automatically doing, in future.


0

http://www.dayid.org/comp/tm.html re-attach an attached session (detaching it from elsewhere) tmux attach -d OR tmux attach-session -d


0

Here's a rollup of all of the other answers into a bash script that will automatically generate .tmux.reset.conf from the default key bindings: #!/bin/bash tmux -f /dev/null -L temp start-server \; list-keys | \ sed -r \ -e "s/bind-key(\s+)([\"#~\$])(\s+)/bind-key\1\'\2\'\3/g" \ -e "s/bind-key(\s+)([\'])(\s+)/bind-key\1\"\2\"\3/g" \ -e ...


1

According to XTerm Control Sequences, those are responses for a particular flavor of mouse, "SGR (1006)". Your terminal was perhaps initialized to send those, e.g., in continuous mode, and on resizing you are seeing the effect of your mouse movement relative to the screen.


0

I have this same problem. The way I workaround it is by making a few X selections (by simply highlighting text in my terminal). If I do this a few times tmux seems to "catch up" and starts responding normally again.


0

This was happening to me. I deleted a .tmux file in my home directory, and that fixed it. You could also try tmux kill-server.


0

With the command tmux ls you will list every session of tmux available and you can find their ID to the far left side, you can also see whether you're attached or not and various other information. To re-attach to the session use the command tmux attach -t ID and the ID you found out earlier. To scroll press Ctrl-b then [, then you can move around as ...


0

Type control-b followed by the modified key (release the control and the b before you type the modified key). The Apple/command key does nothing within a normal terminal session nor does Raspian recognize the key (and the fact that it is pressed is probably not even transmitted over the ssh connection). tmux requires the control key as a modifier unless you ...



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