New answers tagged

0

tmux allows you to create "session groups" - multiple sessions that can all attach to the same set of windows. (With thanks to https://gist.github.com/chakrit/5004006 :) In the left terminal, create a new session+window group. tmux new-session -s left Split it into panes as usual. :split-window -v In the other (right-hand) terminal, connect to ...


0

You will want to start a separate tmux session in each terminal, and then split each session's single tmux window into two panes vertically. So, in each terminal: $ tmux new-session \; split-window -h Or shorter, in each terminal: $ tmux new \; splitw -h You need two sessions, because with one session, the two terminals would always be synchronized ...


0

Can you not do the low-tech method of resizing one terminal (by dragging edges) to cover both monitors, such that the centre divider is at the boundary of the two monitors?


0

tmux looks at the terminal description to see if it can set the title: if the terminal description has the ncurses extended capability XT or if the terminal description has the terminfo capabilities fsl and tsl (from- and to-status-line). ncurses' terminfo database has defined XT for xterm entries for some time (since 2010); there is a discussion of the ...


0

The tmux approach is to use three sessions: an outer session for the panes, an inner session for the windows (you can attach to this from one pane), a secondary view onto the inner session (for the other pane). Yes this is UNIX philosophy gone mad. Let's get started. # Create a session to hold the multiple windows $ tmux new-session -s inner <...


0

The reason why an event-script fails to send a "growler" message is that mcabber closes the standard input, output and error streams when it runs an event command. You can see this in hooks.c: if ((pid=fork()) == -1) { scr_LogPrint(LPRINT_LOGNORM, "Fork error, cannot launch external command."); g_free(datafname); return; } if (pid =...


1

It is working now. Here is a screenshot using the current imgcat script along with iTerm 3.0.2 tmux 2.2 (MacPorts) on OSX El Capitan (10.11.5): The developer is very active, and if it was not working last September there may be a related bug-report/issue number (there are many open issues mentioning imgcat).


0

The various comments about the TERM setting, etc., do not appear to address the actual problem. The most likely explanation is a problem with permissions which prevents tmux from opening the pseudo-terminal connection. For instance, someone may have done a chmod or chown which broke the program. You can see whether this is the case by looking at the ...


4

tmux \ new-session 'compass watch /path/to/project1/compass/' \; \ split-window 'compass watch /path/to/project2/compass/' \; \ detach-client The new-session command (which creates a new tmux session) and the split-window command (which splits the current window into two panes) in tmux takes optional shell commands to run. The detach-client ...


1

An idea: run tmux in tmux. Original set up: Pane 1 and pane 2; side by side. Run vim in Pane 1 as normal. In pane 2, run tmux again and create two panes (one on top of the other this time). Then run vim in pane 2.1 and your CLI in pane 2.2. This should allow you to full screen pane 2.1 with your second instance of Vim resulting in the behaviour you want....


3

The problem is twofold. First, tmux by default converts the control-arrow keys from one type of escape sequence to another. So special keys such as controlleft are sent to vim without the modifier, e.g., left. If you use cat -v to see the different escape sequences, you might see something like this ^[OD versus this (outside tmux): ^[[1;5D The line ...


0

For macOS you can add this line to .tmux.conf bind -t vi-copy y copy-pipe 'pbcopy'


0

Go to terminal preferances. And then click to "command" bar. Check the "Run a custom command instead of my sell" and write whatever command you want to execute at the startup of your terminal.


1

So i got it all working [Unit] Description=HW1SVC After=network.target [Service] Type=simple User=servers2 WorkingDirectory=/data/steamcmd/hw6/ ExecStart=/data/steamcmd/hw6/Hurtworld.x86_64 -batchmode -nographics -exec "autoexec.cfg" -logfile "gamelog.txt" KillSignal=SIGINT TimeoutStopSec=30 Restart=always [Install] WantedBy=network.target this is the ...


1

.tmux.conf set -g utf8 on Fixed the exact same issue for me.


2

This is similar to How to enable Control key combinations for GNU screen on putty?, but addresses a different aspect. In a quick check, it seems that the problem is a conflict between this line set-window-option -g xterm-keys on and this: set -g terminal-overrides "screen*:kLFT5=\eOD:kRIT5=\eOC:kUP5=\eOA:kDN5=\eOB:smkx@:rmkx@" Dropping the set-window-...


0

Vim ~/.vimrc: set t_Co=256 colorscheme <name> Tmux ~/.tmux.conf: set -g default-terminal "screen-256color" Shell After the previous changes, you should adapt your workflow to one of these options: Option #1: always start tmux with the -2 argument: tmux -2 Option #2: set up an alias in your shell config file (~/.bashrc, ~/.zshrc): alias ...


0

Following this link solves my problem: sudo localectl set-locale LANG=en_CA.UTF-8 # or change to en_US.UTF-8 depends on your locale-gen it generates a file /etc/locale.conf that fixes this issue


-1

to fix the issue for me: I just killed the issue pane and window, and created a new window and pane. In the issue pane, CTRL+AX and CTRL+AC.



Top 50 recent answers are included