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1

It seems that there is a race between the new-window and the delete-buffer commands: that is, the buffer "PIPE" is deleted before it can be piped into vim or whatever program you want to be executed. The following ugly hack that sleeps a second before calling delete-buffer fixes the problem for me: bind P command-prompt -I "vim -" \ "capture-pane -eJ ...


3

Those messages are generated by the fortune program, a database of quotations that hails from the UNIX days. The fact that they are appearing when you start tmux (or open a new window or pane) suggests that they are called for your login shell. You can stop this behaviour by removing fortune: apt-get uninstall fortune, and then looking through your shell ...


1

There are alternative repositories from which you can install later versions of tmux, but they are not official. Installing from source is relatively easy: # install any dependency packages needed for building sudo apt-get install -y exuberant-ctags cmake libevent-dev libncurses5-dev # download link from official http://tmux.github.io/ site wget ...


1

This is one possible way to do what you are looking for: tmux sets environment variables in the shells it creates (example $TMUX, $TMUX_PANE), its possible to detect these and run your ssh command to inform your remote session how client has started, we are looking at two steps. First, detecting where ssh is being started, this can be done in a function, ...


2

You are likely looking for 'switch-client' command switchc -t <session name|number> example # create a named session tmux new -s 'main_session' # to switch to it you would use the command switchc -t 'main_session' To the session which you jump a lot, if you name it the same every time then you can bind a key for it. In your ~/.tmux.conf file add ...


0

I was searching for a solution to this exact problem. It can be done using 'set-buffer' and 'paste-buffer' commands tmux att -t <session-name> \; set-buffer "<command>^M" \; paste-buffer Here is a complete example : # let's start with two sessions running bash tmux new -s theOtherSession \; detach tmux new -s astropanic \; rename-window ...


2

tmux (since v1.5) provides TMUX_PANE in the environment of the process it launches for a pane; each new pane gets a server-unique value. So, assuming that TMUX_PANE is available in your environment, then this should do what I think you want: tmux display -pt "${TMUX_PANE:?}" '#{pane_index}' The ${…:?} syntax in a Bourne-like shell prevents the expansion ...


1

You can get all pane index as well as many other information about the panes with tmux list-panes -a See tmux(1) FORMATS to get a list of information you can get and work with.


2

Your second problem seems to be an issue with tmux and the evaluation of certain AppleScripts through osascript. There's a wrapper you can install which should fix the problem. You'll want to install reattach-to-user-namespace through Homebrew or MacPorts and wrap the call to osascript: reattach-to-user-namespace osascript -e 'display notification "Hello, ...


3

You haven't set window active background color, you only set active panel border, try: set-window-option -g window-status-current-bg red


1

It should be enough to modify your ~/.bash_profile so it reads: if [ -f /bin/ksh93 ] then renice -n 4 $$ exec -l /bin/ksh93 fi The renice -n 4 $$ will set the nice value of the current shell ($$) to four, causing subsequent commands launched by that shell to inherit the same niceness value. I have not tested in a tmux session, but it works as ...


0

Just to share my experience. I did struggle today with tmux and linux mint 17 Border in tmux were not ok since last updates. (? i.s.o - or |) I tried lots of things without success. What did solve my problem at the end: - go to setting -> Languages - set Language to English,United kingdom UTF-8 (or other UTF-8) - set Region to French-Belgium UTF-8 - ...



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