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It means that mouse clicks will be reported to whatever is reading the terminal as standard input, the position and click will be encoded in an escape code similar to a special function key. Text mode mouse-aware applications (e.g. aptitude) can then use that to perform functions like any "real" graphical use interface (GUI) programs use a mouse. Such ...


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The two vim instances are completely separate from each-other, but there are two possibilities to do this. If your version of vim was compiled with X clipboard support you can use eg. "+yy to yank the current line to the X clipboard register, alternatively putting set clipboard=unnamed in your vimrc to yank to the clipboard by default. See :help registers ...


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Inside tmux, you need to set TERM=screen-256color. It may be something like here that this only works from inside tmux, but not in tmux.conf. Check that you don't unconditionally overwrite the TERM value, e.g. in your .bashrc, or anything that gets sourced when you open a shell inside tmux.


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There are a lot of ways to do it. The way you mention could be one. xterm is a program that runs another one - it wraps another program in a pty - usually your shell - and channels the input you feed it to the wrapped programs. The thing about pseudo-terminals is they are just emulated devices - and so xterm takes a guess at the device you'll eventually be ...


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My answer to this was to do 2 things: First have the .bashrc line use this so that it works on OSX: [ `uname -s` != Linux ] && exec tmux Secondly, for Ubuntu, change the terminal profile to use tmux directly, e.g. on check the custom command enter tmux, e.g. For quake I also had to update preferences (right click while using it -> ...



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