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2

It looks like tmux is doing the right thing for your example: For example, ctrl-shift-right passes as ^[[C (which is the same as the escape sequence of the right key), instead of ^[OC (outside tmux). because the usual connotation of that sequence is that it is the same as cursor-movement sent from the host. A zero parameter is the same as a missing ...


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Probably you cannot. xterm (and the programs which act like it) makes a distinction between mouse operations with/without the shift modifier: the unshifted operations can be programmed, i.e., an application can send an escape sequence telling xterm to send back escape sequences for each mouse click. the unshifted operations cannot be programmed in this ...


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I don't know if this is possible, but would be interested in a solution as well. You can use the following bash script to simulate a similar behavior, but it's not tested at all, it might break already on simple use cases. #!/usr/bin/env bash cols=$(tput cols) colsi=$((${cols} + 1)) wrap='>>> ' $@ | while IFS='' read -r line; do while [ ...


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I was launching mutt by running tmux neww mutt. mutt was inheriting the environment set in tmux. This includes $GPG_TTY which is different for the new pane in which I'm running mutt (or unset if not in the tmux environment). I wrote a wrapper called gpgtty that sets $GPG_TTY correctly for new panes. #!/bin/sh GPG_TTY=$(tty) $* Then I launch mutt: tmux ...


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According to XTerm Control Sequences, those are responses for a particular flavor of mouse, "SGR (1006)". Your terminal was perhaps initialized to send those, e.g., in continuous mode, and on resizing you are seeing the effect of your mouse movement relative to the screen.


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I added this to my ~/.tmux.conf: set-option -g detach-on-destroy off When I destroy the last shell in a session, it switches to another active session. Once all sessions are closed, tmux exits.



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