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Since you listed /var/cache in /etc/fstab, a tmpfs filesystem is mounted to /var/cache during the boot sequence. Any contents of /var/cache are shadowed by the mount point. The files underneath a directory on which another filesystem is mounted still exist, but they can't be reached, since a path like /var/cache/foo goes into the other filesystem. For more ...


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The mount hides, or shadows, anything already present in the given directory (this may cause fun problems if the permissions are wrong on the thus shadowed dir). So when the tmpfs mount is removed, the original stuff will be there. (If the cache will need to persist, you could mv /var/cache /var/cache.save, and then do rsync things after the tmpfs is first ...


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/etc/default/tmpfs is for sysvinit, for systemd (Debian jessie default) you only need to do: systemctl enable tmp.mount



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