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2

ntpdate is giving you the "socket in use" error because you have a NTP daemon running. This is good. Now, the problem with VMs is that they tend to have a huge time offset (because of being frozen and restarted), and by default NTP panics and exit when the clock skew is too big. Add the following lines to /etc/ntp.conf: tinker panic 0 server ...


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There's no standard definition for “fully start”. If you come up with a definition, there may or may not be a way to detect it. If your definition of “fully start” is “wait until the application becomes idle, waiting for user input”, then you can trace its system calls and look how long it takes to start reading user input. strace -o myapp.strace -tt myapp ...


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What do you mean by "app"? A GUI app? And which app? And what do you mean by "start up"? All programs pretty much start instantly — the delay is in the receiving the output.


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You can try using the date command. Running date with no options will output the system date and time, as in the following output: date Thu Feb 8 16:47:32 MST 2001


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Look at the ls -l /etc/localtime to see at what time the change happened. Then look through logs such as /var/log/audit/audit.log and /var/log/secure for what might have started at around that time. Note that now systemd has taken over /etc/localtime and there is a command timedatectl set-timezone <zone> that can change this file too. Also, there ...



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