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4

Use the time keyword instead of the external command. Using the keyword allows you to run time on any shell command, including function calls, not just on running a program. You can control the output format to some extent through the TIMEFORMAT variable. TIMEFORMAT=%2U time run_eclipse_on … echo "$i::$stat" The time output gets printed on its own line, ...


2

In "Bash Get Time", they describe the arguments to date command. screen uses a similar format, but the arguments are different. Check out the "String Escapes" section of the manual (also available in the man page) for details. As far as I can see, there's no way to achieve what you want. Perhaps seconds (%s) will suffice?


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The time builtin of bash shows timing info on STDERR after the command after it (the actual one) returns. So unless you grouped them and pass the STDERR of the group to a file, only the actual command's STDERR will be redirected to the file and the file will be closed when command returns (prior to time shows its info). You can use command grouping, ...


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I'm assuming you're referring to the 11-minute clock updates in Linux. If you want to keep ntpd running without updating the hardware clock, it appears the only viable option is to rebuild your kernel without the RTC_SYSTOHC option: Set the RTC time based on NTP synchronization If you say yes here, the system time (wall clock) will be stored ...


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@ulrichschwarz is right. The performance tests should not run both processes in parrallel. ---- You could use time which is a shell keyword. On my debian box there is also a binary in the PATH which has more option. In that case, \time needs to be used to run the binary version. There is no explicit fork. I mean the shell does everything for you when a ...



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