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19

It depends a bit what you mean by tiling: Permanently tiling or just temporary to get an overview and select a window? If you use compiz ("Desktop effects") the latter is possible by pressing Super+W (Super is normally the "Windows"-Key). For "permanent" tiling: Tile windows with compiz: Install the Compiz Settings manager (e.g. package ...


12

Personally, i3 takes the best features of the other big tiling-wm's (Xmonad, Awesome, DWM, etc) and combines it into one, Combined with dmenu/conky/dzen2 it's just what I look for in a WM. Check out the page; http://i3.zekjur.net/


11

"Complicated to configure" varies greatly depending on what languages you're proficient in. XMonad was extraordinarily complicated for me to configure, but that was because I know absolutely no Haskell, and that's the language the configurations are in. The two tiling window managers I've used and quite liked are: Awesome. Awesome configurations are in ...


11

The added benefit of terminal multiplexers is that your multiplexer sessions will still be alive and you can reconnect to them even if X (your desktop session) crashes, or you logged out of X.


10

There's a Arch Linux wiki entry comparing 13 different Tiling Window Managers, in grid-like fashion, here on the Arch Linux Wiki. Perhaps it would be hepful. I haven't tried any of them yet, personally, but plan to in the near future when I have some time, so I'm following this thread closely as well.


9

I don't believe there is. The reason for this is probably that people that use tiling window managers tend to be a) quite technically proficient, and b) tend towards minimalism—or exacting standards of control over their setups. Neither of these two conditions lends themselves naturally to pre-built solutions. If your window manager of choice is ...


8

I'd like to recommend two different tiling window managers, one dynamic and one manual. XMonad is very powerful yet easy to learn, there is a short guided tour that explains its basic features and key bindings. It integrates smoothly with GNOME, the documentation is comprehensive and there are lots of additional extensions available. It supports the ...


7

I personally use Ratpoison when I need a light weight tiling WM - The configuration worked pretty well out of box, and since I'm quite adjusted to using GNU Screen for many years the leap to Ratpoison wasn't very difficult. I've also been using StumpWM Which has been more active in development than Ratposion.


7

There are a few out there, but there's one that sticks out (to me) which I found suited my needs: It was not just configured in a nice language, but was also programmed in it (Python) The ability to make my own layouts (which I found awesome didn't do) Lightweight even though it's programmed in a dynamic language (just 6.6MB of ram) The name is Qtile.


7

Your best bet is to go for a "minimal install" of your favorite distro and then "build up" from there. A few distros I have used that offer minimalist installations: Arch Linux would actually be perfect for the minimalist approach as you only install what you want (and dependencies). Awesome, Scrotwm, dwm xmonad, and other tiling WM are available either in ...


6

Salix Ratpoison 13.37 is released! This is probably the first ever linux distribution release featuring Ratpoison as the main window manager. The aim of the Ratpoison edition is to create a system that is fully usable with the keyboard only... (via http://www.linux.org.ru/news/slackware/6856589 (a news item, in Russian)) Salix OS is a derivative ...


5

Just seen another note about a distro featuring such a window manager: Awesome has been around for a few years now, but may be gaining some visibility now that Sabayon Linux has added an awesome edition. Guest author Koen Vervloesem has been using awesome for a number of years, and subscribers can click below for his look at the window manager ...


5

I have lots of experience using xmonad and I think you'll be fine if you give it a whirl. Regarding your specific questions: Almost everything will work just as they normally do. Regarding the specific list you gave, the only one that needs some TLC is chrome. Full screen is a bit flaky and you'll need to futz with your xmonad.hs config to get it to ...


5

Have a look at awesome, name says it all. :-) The awesome wiki has lots of configuration advice.


5

If you know Haskell, definitely Xmonad! Ratpoison is also quite nice, but I like Xmonad's tiling algorithm better and workspaces are a big win IMO.


5

As has been mentioned, Gnome is not a Window Manager, but a Desktop Environment. You can choose from many tiling window managers, such as StumpWM, wmii, or XMonad. Here is how you use one to replace the default window manager. From Mikael Jansson(with a little editing by me to make this more general). If you, like me, use gnome-session 2.3 and ...


4

I've tried several: Awesome, Xmonad, i3, wmii, scrotwm and dwm. dwm stuck with me for the following reasons: dwm has only three layouts: tiled, floating and monocle. tiled mode splits your screen into a 'main area' and a 'stack' of secondary windows, great for coding and debugging It has per-monitor tags. You switch tags only on the active monitor. can ...


4

BlueTile is based on Xmonad but configured OOTB to work well with GNOME (to some degree, it's not as polished as Metacity or Compiz yet...).


4

The answer to your first question is: No. But, there are window managers that can be configured to look and behave almost exactly like you want. The answer to your second question is: Yes. There are several window managers that are easy to use, without needing to configure them. However, what is percieved as "ease of use", varies from user to user and ...


4

I use dwm and tmux. Before learning to use tmux, I would have multiple terminals open for different things, and have them in different tags. Now I can run everything inside of one tmux session, under a single tag, and can detach and reattach without losing state if I need to restart X.


3

Figured it out. I should have run xrandr --output HDMI-0 --mode 1280x1024 --right-of DVI-0 with sudo. That way normal applications don't have access to Randr's setup (resolution etc.), and so can't break anything. Edit: Actually, it helped with only one game (Osmos). For others, monitor is still losing signal, but I can at least run xrandr again to restore ...


3

Yes, theming is specific to each particular application (window manager or otherwise). Applications that use the same GUI toolkit usually use the same configuration mechanism to select a theme, so they'll look the same. Many tiling window managers are designed to have a low visible footprint, so there's not much room for visual theming. Maybe that's why you ...


3

Go to Systemsettings Workspace Appearance and Behavior Window Behavior KWin Scripts Get New Script Tiling Install Enable the checkbox of the installed plugin Apply Have fun! You should read the "documentation" to know how to handle free-floating, different layouts, etc.


3

dwm is an acronym for dynamic window manager: the central principle of dwm is that the tags are supposed to be dynamic, not fixed. See why tags don't remember their layout. The pertag patch breaks this paradigm. If you want to be able to have your window manager use static workspaces, you are better off using xmonad or awesome (both inspired by dwm). ...


2

GNOME is a desktop environment; it's not responsible for handling your windows. You need to change your window manager, which does handle that sort of thing. There are quite a few tiling window managers for X you can experiment with


2

The applet 'X Tile' can tile your windows from the Gnome panel on demand. It's in Fedora at least and works nicely.


2

As other folks have said, you can use whatever tiling window manager tickles your fancy. Xmonad, however, is one of the few - AFAIK - which advertises GNOME integration and is widely used with it. Well, for some definition of "widely" I suppose.


2

I suggest you use gtk-chtheme to set the GTK2 options, and qt-config (part of Qt) to set Qt options. KDE will use the Qt theme if you havn't set anything else, but you should be able to run kcontrol and set a theme/fonts etc, if you want. GNOME saves its configuration in their little registry. KDE saves in the Qt .ini format, under ~/.kde/ somewhere - can't ...


2

For GTK applications themes can be set in the file ~/.gtkrc-2.0. Mine is gtk-icon-theme-name="gnome" and that makes various applications use the gnome icons. You can see a list of available icon themes in /usr/share/icons/.


2

I have used ratpoison in the past. I still remember I happily remap the Caps Lock key to Ratposon's escape key. I switch to awesome because it doesn't have all funtions I need and doesn't seem to actively mantain any more.



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