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1

Assuming you are referring to caja, the default file manager on Cinnamon, you can get the path by pressing Ctrl + L and you can open a terminal by right clicking and selecting the relevant option: The screenshot above was taken on Cinnamon 2.2.16 and caja caja 1.8.2.


2

The problem is: When bash is started non-interactively then it does not read ~/.bashrc. Thus you have to read h() from the script. If you want to use aliases in a script then you have to enable the use of aliases in the script with shopt -s expand_aliases define the alias in the script. An alternative to an alias is defining a shell function (which ...


1

If you have GNU stdbuf, you can use: $ stdbuf -o0 -e0 php -S 0.0.0.0:12345 | tee -a access.log PHP 5.4.34-0+deb7u1 Development Server started at Mon Nov 24 14:38:33 2014 Listening on http://0.0.0.0:12345 Document root is /home/cuonglm Press Ctrl-C to quit.


1

What you describe as your "actual" IP address isn't, it is the IP address of your router, or anything else that got an IP address from your provider and acts as an intermediary for your computer to the internet. That is why your (windows) hosts provides an internal address as well. Your VirtualBox host gives out IP addresses in the range 10.x.x.x by default ...


0

From your experiments, it appears that the vsim program wants its standard input to be connected to a terminal; if it isn't, it either does nothing useful (because it's waiting for input but not getting any) or exits. $ vsim $ sh -c vsim This runs the command normally from a terminal, in the foreground. The command can read input from the terminal. $ ...


0

Sounds like you messed up your /etc/locale.gen file. If you are english/US, comment out any of the other entries in that file, UNLESS YOU NEED THEM. They are for other languages. If you are american you more then likely only need en_US.UTF8. Edit the /etc/locale.gen file and uncomment en_US.UTF8. Comment out any others, unless of course you need them ...


0

Two good answers/examples here http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1710/tail-a-log-file-with-long-lines-truncated tail -f logfile.log | cut -b 1-80 tail -f logfile.log | cut -b -$(tput cols) One caveat: at least on the built in terminal on my Mac cut does not seem to handle tab characters very well. It seems it displays them with e.g., 8 spaces ...


2

The terminal emulator sends the x character, and the terminal driver sees that this has been configured as the erase character. So instead of echoing it back to the emulator, it sends the appropriate sequence to erase the previous character (e.g. backspace-space-backspace). Even when the erase character is set to Backspace, simply echoing it wouldn't ...


2

To plagiarize myself, you can set up a profile with your desired settings (instructions adapted from here): Run terminator, and set up the layout you want. You can use Ctrl+Shift+E to split windows vertically and Ctrl+Shift+O (that's O as in oodles, not zero) to split horizontally. For this example, I have created a layout with 6 panes: Right click on ...


0

Are you searching for terminal multiplexer tmux. http://tmux.sourceforge.net/


0

Back when I was using terminator this is the rc file that I used to open a bunch of terminals and run applications. Save it to .config/terminator/config. [global_config] title_hide_sizetext = True enabled_plugins = LaunchpadCodeURLHandler, APTURLHandler, LaunchpadBugURLHandler [keybindings] [profiles] [[default]] font = DejaVu Sans Mono 9 ...


0

Another user posted a similar problem on the Linux Mint forum: http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=28403&p=164776. Apparently, Linux Mint 17 rewrites /etc/issue, /etc/motd, etc on reboots. To prevent this, edit /etc/linuxmint/mintSystem.conf: [global] enabled = True [restore] lsb-release = True etc-issue = False splash-screens = True ...


3

echo ' ████████ ██████████████ ████████████████ ██████████████████ ██████████████████ ████████████████ ██████████████ ████████' Or programmatically and using reverse video instead of Unicode boxing character: $ awk -v radius=20 'BEGIN{ for (y = -radius; y <= radius; y++) { x = sqrt(radius * radius - y * y) printf ...


1

If the only issue are the colors in the output of ls, it's easy to fix. Just set your own LS_COLORS variable and that will override anything else. So, to start, run dircolors -p > ~/.mycolors That will print the default values into a new file called .mycolors in your $HOME directory. Note that this will set the default colors from your current ...


0

It is mostly to do with the size of the window assumed by the terminal is not the same as your actual window size. If you are using bash, you can try this. $shopt | grep checkwinsize If you don't get checkwinsize on Then activate it with $shopt -s checkwinsize Then just attempt resizing the window once, the above works for me every time.


0

I just wanted to add to what Arcadien had already mentioned. The checkwinsize enabling does the trick, but for me, what was needed was to reset the size of the window for it to work properly. I guess the checkwinsize was meant to eliminate this, but still, worth a shot. Just try changing the size of the window or un-maximizing and maximizing it post this ...


0

I finally find my way (xfce solution): first enable shortcut accelerator as describe here: http://docs.xfce.org/xfce/xfce4-settings/appearance#menu_and_buttons Then you can add, change or remove shortcut by pointing the mouse pointer on action in menu, you wish to modify and tape the shortcut or backspace to delete it.


0

As mentioned by other users, tell the shell which encoding you're using with export LANG=en_US.UTF-8 Put this in .bashrc and gnome-terminal should pick it up on the next login. Set the encoding for gnome-terminal on the fly: Menubar > Terminal > Set Character Encoding Set default encoding permanently: gconf-editor > Apps > gnome-terminal > Profiles > ...


0

I experienced the same problem after my ssh connection closed unexpectedly with the message Write Failed: broken pipe while I had a screen session attached. However I could not get my screen session to reattach using any of the commands above. Note that I use the following version: ~> screen --version Screen version 4.00.03 (FAU) 23-Oct-06 Apparently ...


0

Turned out it was a bug in the particular version of pppd that was being used in the distro. I checked and previous and later versions of pppd do not have this problem. Also the problem is not specific to this arch and platform or tmux. If pppd is being run inside a shell script, It does not handle Ctrl-C, while outside shell, it has no problem.


1

get is a legal sftp command, but can't be used that way. The correct syntax to download filename.tar.gz to your Mac is: sftp user@host:/path/to/filename.tar.gz /some/local/folder (Replace user with the user you use to connect to the remote server, replace host with the remote server name.) There's nothing special to tar.gz files in the above command, it ...


1

The control sequence \e]0;TITLE\a is recognized by many terminal emulators; it sets the window title. This control sequence is not recognized by the Linux console (which doesn't have a title anyway): it sees \e]0, decides “I don't know what this means, so I'll ignore it”, and prints the following text. You'll need to set your prompt differently depending on ...


0

Plain CtrlPgUp and CtrlPgDn should work to cycle tabs. There's a option in the "Tabs" menu which shows the shortcuts. If you don't see the menu bar, right click inside the terminal window and pick "Show Menubar".


1

All sessions will stop as the get signalled with SIGHUP. (Assuming you did nothing to prevent that signal from being processed). There is no timeout for that, just a minimal delay as the signal causes the process to be stopped, which causes the SIGHUP on the next, etc.


1

Another solution (not mentioned already) is to send the SIGQUIT signal using ctrl+\ It is stronger than a ctrl+c


1

This seems to have worked for the OP. gdbserver :2345 ls > /dev/null 2>&1 & I think the reason for this is because when a program is daemonized it closes all the STDIO 0,1 & 2. The next IO to open will be 0. If the program tries to use 0,1 or 2 with things like printf or scanf it will be acting on the wrong IO or a closed IO. For example ...


1

I have never found a way to truly fork off with a shell, there are too many reasons why something will remain connected. I wrote a very small C program to fully fork off any commands you run after it. I hope this helps you. ----- daemonize.c #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include ...


1

If your terminal starts a normal bash session, that bash will read in ~/.bashrc. If you have additional commands in ~/.bash_profile, those will only be read by the login shell and not by a non-login bash start. You can easily source ~/.bashrc from ~/.bash_profile with something like: if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then . ~/.bashrc fi And then move everything else ...


0

In the spirit of this I will answer my own question. So to get this to work: Open the terminal application in Centos (In the Applications\Accessories\Terminal) Select the Edit\Current Profile (If you want to make this the default for your current profile) Select the "Title and Command" tab and tick the option "Run command as login shell" This then ...


0

Well the most useful solution I have seen for the moment is this one: screen -S CMD1 -d -m command1 ; screen -S CMD2 -d -m command2 ; And you connect to the screens with: screen -r <pid>.<cmd> and logout with control+a d It's interesting but... a bit clunky a would say as you don't visualize your interfaces and have to move from one to ...


1

You don't need X on the server in order to run xterm (or gnome-terminal). If DISPLAY is not set once you ssh into the server, that might be the problem (check with echo $DISPLAY). If your local machine has no X installed, then you should look at tmux or screen to "multiply" your terminals.


1

I am working on a terminal spreadsheet based on "sc". It has undo/redo, mapping and other stuff. If interested, you can take a look at: https://github.com/andmarti1424/scim


0

You can put this into the .bashrc to change the terminal name (window name) to the last directory (or file name) that you are in (working on). case "$TERM" in xterm*|rxvt*) PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;${PWD##*/}\007"' ;; *) ;; esac more described here: link


0

The following in /etc/sudoers should give you per-user rather than per-user-per-tty credential caching: Defaults !tty_tickets According to the sudoers man page, sudoers uses per-user time stamp files for credential caching. Once a user has been authenticated, a record is written containing the uid that was used to authenticate, the terminal ...


1

In addition to @wurtel's answer (especially the likely explanation of the > problem), stty echo is the opposite of stty -echo, so you might use that. You can also use reset, which usually comes with ncurses packages.


4

The usual remedy for things like this is stty sane The stty -echo should not have made this worse, as that just turns off echoing of input, and you already had that. The fact that you say returns just causes > to appear means that you've started somethng that is causing continuance over the next lines, e.g. echo ' will do that because it's waiting for ...


1

The direct aequivalent of unzip -p -a for 7zip is 7z e -so -bd. But that complains it does not want to write to stdout (even if I clearly told itso): $ 7z e -so -bd file.zip 7-Zip [64] 9.20 Copyright (c) 1999-2010 Igor Pavlov 2010-11-18 p7zip Version 9.20 (locale=en_US.UTF-8,Utf16=on,HugeFiles=on,8 CPUs) Error: I won't write data and program's messages ...


0

The corresponding 7zip command is 7zip x -so that will extract your archive to the standard output stream.



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