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28

Try the unicode utility: $ unicode ‽ U+203D INTERROBANG UTF-8: e2 80 bd UTF-16BE: 203d Decimal: ‽ ‽ Category: Po (Punctuation, Other) Bidi: ON (Other Neutrals) Or the uconv utility from the ICU package: $ printf %s ‽ | uconv -x any-name \N{INTERROBANG} You can also get information via the recode utility: $ printf %s ‽ | recode ..dump UCS2 ...


14

Characters of code 0 to 31 in ASCII are control characters. When sent to a terminal, they're used to do special things. For instance, \a (BEL, 0x7) rings the terminal's bell. \b (BS, 0x8) moves the cursor backward. \n (LF, 0xa) moves the cursor one row down, \t (TAB 0x9) moves the cursor to the next tabulation... \r (CR, 0xd) moves the cursor to the first ...


6

Outgoing ICMP (ping) is probably blocked by your firewall or gateway. That you are able to browse the Internet does not need ICMP (ping) to be working. You also might have a proxy configured which allows you to only surf the web.


5

\x0d is the character \r which brings the cursor to the start of the line, then \x20 is a space, so it overwrites the a with a space. If you're on a unix-y system you may want to consider just removing \r from your output/file since it's not needed if it's for text output. The \n "implies" it for *nix, but not for Windows.


5

Perhaps the closest thing to what you are looking for is MacPorts (or some other package management system like Homebrew). It can be used to install software(including many Unix software) easily.


4

The best way I know is through Perl's uniprops. It comes with Perl's Unicode::Tussle module. You can install it with sudo perl -MCPAN -e 'install Unicode::Tussle' You can then run it on any glyph you want to test: $ uniprops ‽ U+203D ‹‽› \N{INTERROBANG} \pP \p{Po} All Any Assigned InPunctuation Punct Is_Punctuation Common Zyyy Po P ...


4

You can use Perl viacode function from charnames module: $ perl -Mcharnames=:full -CLS -nle 'print charnames::viacode(ord)' <<<"‽" INTERROBANG $ perl -Mcharnames=:full -CLS -nle 'print charnames::viacode(ord)' <<<"🐄" COW charnames was first released with perl v5.6.0


4

You can use unicode, which also outputs some more information than just the name: # unicode – U+2013 EN DASH UTF-8: e2 80 93 UTF-16BE: 2013 Decimal: &#8211; – Category: Pd (Punctuation, Dash) Bidi: ON (Other Neutrals)


4

Probably a limit of the terminal device line discipline internal line editor buffer. You should be able to enter long lines by pressing Ctrl+D in the middle of it (so the currently entered part be sent to cat and the line editor flushed), or by disabling that line editor altogether. For instance, if using zsh: STTY=-icanon cat > file Note that then ...


4

The built-in delay is to slow down the process of password guessing. Looks like someone could programmatically guess about 27 potential passwords per minute, which, as you've observed is a good deal less than if there was no delay.


3

I don't think this has to do with fonts. The invisible windows look like a graphics stack problem. Try switching to a non-compositing window manager temporarily, and see if the problem goes away. Re corrupt files, I'm not sure how they'd get corrupted unless they were being written or replaced during the crash. I suppose font caches and such might be ...


3

If you have root access to the remote box, install the package ncurses-term. This will provide the rxvt-256color terminfo entry. As a non-root user, you can also copy over the rxvt terminfo entries to $HOME/.terminfo/r/ on the remote machine, and export TERMINFO=$HOME/.terminfo. ssh <host> 'mkdir -p .terminfo/r' scp ...


3

Use W (capital w) to save the top configuration after you made your changes.


3

Have a look at the Drawille library. It uses the UTF braille characters to draw pixels.


3

webster is not a common command among Unix systems. It is not a part of Debian's apt repository and it is also not part of the two major packaging tools Homebrew and MacPorts. Probably it is only available on Stanford computers. However additional commands can be installed with ease using one of the two. I would suggest using Homebrew since many packages ...


2

You said you wanted to grant read and write permissions to all subdirectories and files under: /home/user/workspace/MinimalDbaseExample ... right? Octal 0777 permissions grant rwxrwxrwx symbolically. Octal 0755 permissions grant rwxr-xr-x symbolically. Octal 0666 permissions grant rw-rw-rw- symbolically. To set read/write/execute permissions to the ...


2

This is nothing to do with the echo command. You'd see this same behaviour if you wrote the output using cat, printf, or some other program. This is an aspect of your terminal. And terminals can differ amongst themselves in this regard. The terminfo database will or won't have, for your terminal, an auto_left_margin capability, known as bw in termcap. ...


2

echo can't move back past the position it started at. No matter how many backspaces you use, once you've erased everything you've output it stays at the initial position. That's why you always see the 'c' character, however many times you backspace.


2

You can use a trap to achieve this: trap 'echo -ne "\e[0m"' DEBUG According to bash's man: a trap on DEBUG executes before every simple command, for command, case command, select command, every arithmetic for command, and before the first command executes in a shell function So every time you execute the command, the shell will insert \e[0m ...


2

There is currently no way to do this. See this accepted answer on stackoverflow which suggests changing pane-borders instead. You can set values for pane-active-border-style and pane-border-style in your ~/.tmux.conf. See this answer for more details configuring these values (and some inconsistencies between tmux versions).


2

Sometimes, a reinstall might not work because there may be dependencies that are corrupt, but not reinstalled because the OS thinks they're good. Try these: On your invisible terminal, try installing debsums. sudo apt-get install debsums. Then, a visible terminal would really help at this point. Init the freshly-installed package. sudo debsums_init Then, ...


2

Using screen -x allows you to connect to a session that it currently attached, without forcing it to detach. For example, if you do this in two separate xterms, you will see input and output of both instances simultaneously. This is useful when logging in from several locations; it avoids having to reattach once you go back to the location where you first ...


2

You can use script. It will basically save everything printed on the terminal in that script session. From man script: script makes a typescript of everything printed on your terminal. It is useful for students who need a hardcopy record of an interactive session as proof of an assignment, as the typescript file can be printed out later with lpr(1). ...


2

I haven't been able to find a full, detailed description of what the mapping between keypresses and control characters needs to be. What makes you think that it needs to be anything? Hint: Why do you think that every terminal emulator program has, either directly or indirectly (via X or some such), some sort of keyboard map file? Go and look at ...


2

You should probably start at http://invisible-island.net/xterm/ctlseqs/ctlseqs.html and http://www.vt100.net/ which describe the desired behavior (at least the input/output sequences), as well as of course studying some of the terminal emulators out there, including their changelogs of the issues they addressed. I don't think there's a complete checklist ...


2

Try pressing Alt+F2. I'm not totally sure about this though, as when I search Alt+F2 in LXDE on Google there seem to be a fair number of results about a bug. Not sure if those still apply. However, this is the shortcut that worked for me last time I used LXDE.


2

The argument to a LS_COLORS directive is a string that is written to the terminal as part of an escape sequence. When displaying a file name, ls writes \e[, then the string associated with the file type, then m, then the file name, then \e[0m (where \e represents an escape character). This is the escape sequence that tells xterm and compatible terminals ...


1

Looks like compositor in Cinnamon is not working properly, it is probably an issue with your drivers. Unfortunately, it seems that you can't disable compositing in cinnamon manually: Github issue. My suggestion is to install some non-compositing wm like openbox and try if this issue will reproduce. Besides, try different drivers. Now you use drivers: ...


1

Wait, the terminal text is invisible AND you don't see text in dropdown-boxes from X-Windows widgets?? That sounds like a font problem to me. You do know you have a console, right? CTL-ALT-F1 should get you there. At least then you have a working, local terminal, one which you can read. (Usually, ALT-F7 gets you back to X, but I can't say for sure on your ...


1

Yes. This is easy. Install the system with the GUI libraries for X (drivers optional) and for the desktop environment you want. Then, run something like the TigerVNC server, and you're done.



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