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why not try guake? It's always running in background,and when you want to use it,press the hot key it will show up! For more detail click here


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some_command | cat - /dev/tty ...will work with anything, pretty much. If the launcher you use doesn't properly handle pipelines in a command, you might want... sh -c 'some_command | cat - /dev/tty' You can send an interrupt with CTRL+C to kill cat and end the session, or else just close the terminal window when ready.


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xterm -hold from $(man xterm): -hold Turn on the hold resource, i.e., xterm will not immediately destroy its window when the shell command completes. It will wait until you use the window manager to destroy/kill the window, or if you use the menu entries that send a signal, e.g., HUP or KILL.


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You can achieve this in any terminal emulator by the simple expedient of arranging for the program not to exit without user confirmation. Tell the terminal to run terminal_shell_wrapper which is a script containing something like #!/bin/sh if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then "${SHELL:-sh}"; else "$@"; fi echo "The command exited with status $?. Press Enter to close the ...


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The terminal emulator translates events like “the Tab key was pressed” into sequences of characters that the application running in the terminal (bash, in your case) reads. See How do keyboard input and text output work? for a more detailed presentation of this topic. For historical reasons, a few of keys send a character that's the same as pressing Ctrl ...


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Keyboards speak key transitions and keycodes, programs reading them directly can see every keydown and keyup. The terminals being emulated speak ASCII, and they universally produce TAB aka HT via ^I. There's really nothing any terminal emulator can do to work around that. So windowing-system-based programs can generally distinguish between TAB and ^I -- ...


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You should probably start at http://invisible-island.net/xterm/ctlseqs/ctlseqs.html and http://www.vt100.net/ which describe the desired behavior (at least the input/output sequences), as well as of course studying some of the terminal emulators out there, including their changelogs of the issues they addressed. I don't think there's a complete checklist ...


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I haven't been able to find a full, detailed description of what the mapping between keypresses and control characters needs to be. What makes you think that it needs to be anything? Hint: Why do you think that every terminal emulator program has, either directly or indirectly (via X or some such), some sort of keyboard map file? Go and look at ...


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This answer is not the most-specific for the user's question Please see my 2nd answer. I am leaving this here because it addresses the more general issue. Per the comments to your original post, you need (1) a terminal emulator which supports bracketed paste and (2) corresponding support for whatever is running in the terminal, ie, vim, bash, zsh. Terminal ...



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