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Terminal emulators have control sequences for inserting and deleting characters (and lines) on the screen. But when you are running an application (whether a shell or a text editor), the control sequences you may enter are as a rule not echoed to the terminal. The application reads these special keys and decides what control sequences to send to the ...


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Terminal emulators cannot edit text on their own, and hence the concept of insert mode vs. overwrite mode doesn't exist on this level. They just send the keypresses to the running application (via the kernel's tty driver), and receive (again, via the kernel tty driver) and interpret data from the application and update the screen accordingly. For the ...


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There is no need to stay with Tilda for the "drop-down" function. Terminator already offers this. To use it, right click on the Terminator window and select Preferences. Then select Window state: as Hidden. You can customise the hotkey in the preferences as well with Keybindings > hide_window.


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I just had the same question as this, because I though Terminator affords the ability for split windows, but @RAKK is right, tmux can be used as well, here's how: First, I wanted to have a customized bash (which I start with command mybash) start up, that can be done in Tilda with /bin/bash -i -c 'LINES=10 COLUMNS=150 mybash' under Preferences / Title and ...


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Most terminal emulators can "do" this, but it takes some work: Suppose the line you want to move is at the bottom of the screen. If you want to move that line up, you would scroll (or "index") the line by sending an escape sequence to the bottom row and (counting!) move the line up by the number of lines you want to scroll. Scrolling moves all lines on the ...



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