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The terminal emulator sends the x character, and the terminal driver sees that this has been configured as the erase character. So instead of echoing it back to the emulator, it sends the appropriate sequence to erase the previous character (e.g. backspace-space-backspace). Even when the erase character is set to Backspace, simply echoing it wouldn't ...


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I certainly agree with the other suggestions to use tmux/screen - this is "right way" to accomplish this task. With that said, if the poster wants something incredibly simple, and isn't concerned with having the sessions restored if his/her Windows box disconnects, MTPuTTY would probably be the very easiest solution from a Windows client.


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You can use tmux to have multiple screens/windows running. Below is a snippet of a script that i Use to show you an example of this: #Declares winod WinSplit tmux new-window -a -n WinSplit tmux new-session -d -s WinSplit -n SSH0 -d tmux selectp -t WinSplit #Binds Keys, activates window activity, color coding of panes tmux bind-key -n M-Left previous-window ...


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When you connect via Putty, that is not the same as opening a terminal program on the desktop (there you can use Ctrl+Shift+T). You'll have to install an X server on your Windows machine (like MingW) and then you can use any X client including such a terminal program that support multiple tabs. Alternatively use tmux or screen to start an application with ...


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Okay here is what I have on my .zshrc for ctrl+<-, ctrl+-> and alt+<-, alt+-> ## use Ctrl <- and Ctrl -> for jumping to word-beginnings on the CL bindkey "^[[1;5C" forward-word bindkey "^[[1;5D" backward-word ## the same for alt-left-arrow and alt-right-arrow bindkey '^[[1;3C' forward-word ...



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