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0

Some info about how recovery works can be found at Recovering a damaged .gz file There also is a tool that helps you doing this: gzip Recovery Toolkit aka gzrecover


2

You can do this with squashfs. Not only do you get the single archive built from the stream - but it's mountable and builtin to the kernel's vfs: From pseudo-file.example: # Copy 10K from the device /dev/sda1 into the file input. Ordinarily # Mksquashfs given a device, fifo, or named socket will place that special file # within the Squashfs filesystem, ...


3

You problem puzzled me for some time, and I think I have found a solution that would work. I think you can achieve what you want with 7z using the -si{NAME} flag. You will be able to adapt to your need. 7z a test.7z -siSDA2.txt < /dev/sda1 7z a test.7z -siSDA2.txt < /dev/sda2 7z l test.7z 7-Zip [64] 9.20 Copyright (c) 1999-2010 Igor Pavlov ...


2

In Test: pax -w's|.*/||' dir[1-3]/* | xz > file.tar.xz would archive the files without their path components. Note that the dir[1-3]/* would omit hidden files. For symlinks, the -s would also rewrite the symlink targets. If you only want the regular files in there, and assuming none of your file names contain newline characters, you could do: find ...


0

From the top of the manual: Examples: tar -cf archive.tar foo bar # Create archive.tar from files foo and bar. Therefore: tar cf tarfile.tar directory-to-tar Note: In Unix speak a directory is a file, and many other things also: If it is in a directory, then it has a file-name, and it is a file.


5

The tar command historically has been one of the few commands that doesn't follow the Unix utility syntax guidelines. The standards page for tar says: f Use the first file operand (or the second, if b has already been specified) as the name of the archive instead of the system-dependent default While the syntax guidelines include this: Guideline ...


-1

To create the archive $ tar -cvf music.tar Music/ This shows the list of file & folders $ tar -tvf music.tar And to extract again $ tar -xvf music.tar


10

The -f option should directly precede the filename. So, use tar -vczf filename.tar.gz instead of -vcfz


3

Remove - from vcfz options. tar does not need hyphen for options. Also check your write permission to the directory from which you are executing the command.


0

Spent sometime on this today, and I think there are two issues here: every for loop iteration, a new incremental file is created (or old one is overwritten :-) . Remember, there is 1:1 mapping between the archive file and the snapshot file, thus one gtar-incremental can not serve all of the archive files. gtar does not like time stamps.This is because the ...


1

Let's assume you have a tarball called lotsofdata.tar.gz and you just know there is one file in there you want but all you can remember is that its name contains the word contract. You have two options: Either use tar and grep to list the contents of your tarball so you can find out the full path and name of any files that match the part you know, and then ...


0

I have figured out how to deal with this problem without changing any MIME settings. Go to the page that has the download link Assuming you have the numbered link option on, set the cursor on the link using the "g" command. For example, if the link is numbered "[23]", type "23g" and press enter. If you just enter 23, then Lynx will try to download or ...


2

When you untar, you can specify the destination directory by specifying the -C option: /home/user>tar -xzvf test.tar.gz -C /home/user/destination/dir


1

Not sure to catch what you meant, however tar usually strip first / , so unless extracting from / you should have no problem. cd /data1 ; tar xf whaterver cd /datan ; tar xf whaterver in your case, you end up with /data1/usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages/openerp-7.0_20140802_231142-py2.6.egg/ /data1/home/openerp2/openerp2 ...


-2

You can do it by passing the following arguments to tar: $ tar -cvzf test.tar test_file


2

These meta characters for --checkpoint-action were introduced in version 1.28, which was released a week ago. A way to get approximate progress status on demand is to check the position of the tar process in its input file. You can see that with lsof -p1234 where 1234 is the PID of the tar process. On Linux, you can check the pos: line of ...



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