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8

This is done via an authorization manager called polkit: polkit provides an authorization API intended to be used by privileged programs (“MECHANISMS”) offering service to unprivileged programs (“SUBJECTS”) often through some form of inter-process communication mechanism. With systemd and polkit users with non-remote session can issue power ...


5

Yes, a dist-upgrade from wheezy to jessie will switch to using systemd as the init system. The jessie release notes devotes a whole section to this issue, also giving a recommendation about how to stay with your current init system: to prevent systemd-sysv from being installed during the upgrade, you can create a file called ...


4

Looks like that's a systemd issue currently tracked under bug #751636. When the host is shut down or restarted, systemd might shut down the network before it kills the ssh session. There are a couple of solutions provided but nothing concrete: Using acpid/acpi-support-base to handle the power events & add the following to the ...


3

I'll try to summarize my findings for this issue in case someone comes across this as information on this topic is scant. Restart=on-failure only applies to process failures (does not apply to failure due to dependency failures) The fact that dependent failed units get restarted under certain conditions when a dependency successfully restart was a bug in ...


2

Since you're using /etc/network/interfaces, you'll need a systemd service to monitor the status of each interface. Check to see if you have /lib/systemd/system/ifup-wait-all-auto.service (installed by the ifupdown package in Ubuntu 15.04). If not, then create /etc/systemd/system/ifup-wait-all-auto.service, and paste in the following: [Unit] Description=Wait ...


2

Why? Even though you can remove sysvinit a lot of system packages still rely on sysvinit style scripts. How can I safely get rid off sysvinit? Is it safe to remove remains of sysvinit by... This depends on what you have installed on your system, if no system components depend on them then yes it is safe, apt will tell you. Note that you can use rdepends ...


2

As nzbget -D runs it in the background as a daemon you need to tell systemd this: [Service] ExecStart=/opt/nzbget/nzbget -D # process will demonize and parent return ok Type=forking or perhaps not run with -D? See this article. It is one in a series on systemd that I can highly recommend.


2

systemd does its own minipalistic shell-style command line parsing of the contents of ExecStart= and other parameters. This minimalistic parsing supports basic environment variable substitution but apparently not things like ${PORT:+port is $PORT}. You will want to prevent systemd from doing that and let the invoked shell handle it. From the documentation: ...


2

Apparently, udev has changed the way it matches hardware in v220, which means that it was necessary to change keyboard:usb:v046DpC52B* to evdev:input:b0003v046Dp402D* (the b0003 is the bus-id of USB) What irritates me is that another product ID is now needed. Before v220, the ID C52B was used for all parts of the device (a multi-button mouse), however ...


2

Because the Gentoo developer community thinks it's no problem installing those files unconditionally, as long as the systemd dependency is not pulled in. And you can prevent that with INSTALL_MASK=/usr/lib/systemd in your make.conf (see man 5 make.conf).


2

Systemd is working with services and targets. Targets is the equivalent of runlevels, services is the equivalent of init scripts. Most of systemd configuration is located in /usr/lib/systemd, while standard init are in /etc/{init.d,rc*.d,inittab}. When an issue kicks in during the boot process (default are getty.target or graphical.target, you can get them ...


2

Assuming the service's name is subsonic, If you run systemctl status subsonic.service and there are no errors, then the subsonic service is being run as a system service, in which case this answer won't help much. However, if you get an error there, but instead run systemctl --user status subsonic.service and have no errors, then that means that the ...


2

First of all, you must not have several ESPs. The one and only ESP in your system can contain any number of bootloaders in form of EFI applications. Now you need to stick with one EFI System Partition, copy there all files from the other one and then delete the other one. After that, re-install systemd-boot (or any other EFI boot manager of your choice) on ...


2

The problem is due to socat being bi-directional by default. It attempts to read its standard input which is /dev/null, it gets an EOF and exits. The solution is to use the -u option: ExecStart=/usr/bin/socat -u UDP-RECV:4321 STDOUT This tells socat to run unidirectionally from UDP-RECV:4321 to STDOUT.


2

You can use the directive StopWhenUnneeded=yes in the dependency target unit file (i. e. hlstatsx.service).


2

Required is not a valid directive. You might mean either Requires or RequiredBy. The directives are enumerated in the man page for systemd.directives(7).


1

The After= and Before= parameters are strictly for ordering the startup (and maybe the shutdown) of two services if both are asked to be started. Having a service listed there doesn't mean that those services will also be started up. If you want to control whether or not another service gets started, you need to use Requires=, Wants=, or Conflicts= (which ...


1

What does replacing a hot plugable disk drive it have to do with how the system is booted? It doesn't manage hotpluggable devices, but it has the information to react to the events a hotplug produces, it may start, stop restart a service, you can ask it to mount the disk and it will know if it is still there when the system reboots so it is unmounted ...


1

Systemd reimplements many functionalities previously scattered over the whole OS (eg. in udev daemon), and is able to recognize that device was just plugged in or out. At the same time, systemd holds all system services configuration: what need to be run, how to run it etc. And simply, it has all knowledge needed to start, stop, or even reconfigure services ...


1

Jessie will install systemd by default, even as an upgrade from Wheezy. After installation you can disable it by following the instructions at How to remove systemd from a Debian jessie/sid installation There are explanations of these commands on that page, but the gist is as follows: apt-get install sysvinit-core sysvinit sysvinit-utils reboot # BE AWARE ...


1

IUSE is needed only if you actually reference that USE flag in the ebuild. In the few ebuilds I checked they don't use the systemd USE flag and just blindly install systemd service definitions in /usr/lib/systemd/system/, just as they blindly install the OpenRC init scripts without checking for the openrc USE flag. The systemd (and openrc) USE flags are ...


1

The latter (fsck.mode=force) is the right approach. However, to fsck a root, you must either: have a systemd-controlled initramfs (so that it could parse fsck.mode=force) with the corresponding fsck binary built in; have an initramfs which mounts rootfs read-only (so that systemd, started from rootfs, still can check it — checking a read-write mounted ...


1

I encountered the same problem: The systemd-localed service launches the binary /lib/systemd/systemd-localed, which then tries to read /etc/locale.conf, /etc/vconsole.conf and — even though that doesn't seem to be documented anywhere — /etc/default/keyboard: # strace /lib/systemd/systemd-localed […] open("/etc/locale.conf", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE|O_CLOEXEC) ...



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