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4

You should boot into Windows and resize one of the partitions. The tool is at Control Panel -> System and Maintenance -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management and there under Storage -> Disk Management. After this you can install Linux Mint into the empty space.


0

If this is your setup, all you need to do is boot into Linux and let it know you have a new OS installed. So, keep grub where it is, on /dev/sda, boot into your Linux system and run: sudo update-grub That will generate output similar to this: Generating grub configuration file ... Found background image: /usr/share/images/desktop-base/desktop-grub.png ...


0

From Arch Linux: Currently we have official packages optimized for the i686 and x86-64 architectures https://www.archlinux.org/download/


-1

I've come up with an alternative solution: check the modification date of the files in /etc/directory. The assumption is that most of them will have the modification date equal to that of the installation. The last line(s) of the following command is the installation date guesstimate: ls -ltrR /etc > etc.txt -- and then -- cat etc.txt | tr -s " " | cut ...


3

The three block devices are logical volumes in an LVM volume group, fedora. swap is used for swap (spill-over for RAM), home is used to store all your personal data, and root is used for everything else (programs, system configuration, system logs...). There are good reasons for these three devices to be separate: swap works better as a separate block ...


0

The easiest way to do this using a UI that will guide you through the process is GParted, otherwise you could delete/modify partitions with fdisk in the command line.


1

Why would you need 3 partitions? You only need one. Either sda2 or sda3 are big enough for a normal installation. The new installation normally will overwrite your boot sector, if you don't want that make sure to deselect that option. In that case you will have to boot in the old 14.04 and run update-grub for it to find the new 14.04 and add it to the grub ...


0

I posted an answer to this over on this page, it should work for this too. CentOS 7 Installation Failed


1

/dev/root is missing. This can often be caused by a mismatched label or /dev/sdXx root device when booting from USB. When the dracut shell becomes available, create a directory: mkdir /mnt/ Mount different block devices until you have found the one that contains the USB installer(this typically doesn't happen on true/Virt CDROM mounts). Once you find ...


0

I made a detailed tutorial regarding creation of a GRUB2 multiboot/multiISO LiveUSB. Feel free to fork and make pull request(s)!



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