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That's pretty much all archlinux is with the bare bones install. Want a de? Install it yourself. Web browser? The same. Archlinux is beautiful in that it avoids shoving a bunch of crap on your machine that you might remove anyways. The base installed gives you just enough to have a bootable, usable system. After that, you're free to add whatever you want.


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I had the same issue with a virtual CD. The installer looks up the drive based on the label that contains spaces (\x20). In my case, the installer could not find the virtual CD. I changed the command line (press TAB) to DRIVE=hd:/dev/sr0


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The iso you download may be correct md5 wise, but the problem may be either with the way the DVD is recorded or the way it is read by the drive. You can try burning the iso with an other program, like Infrarecorder (http://infrarecorder.org/) and verify the image when burning it, or you may try making a bootable usb flash and boot from that.


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I have done it: hypervisor=`dmesg --notime | grep -i hypervisor | cut -d ':' -f2 | tr -d " \t\n\r" echo "Hypervisor is $hypervisor" It helps on scripts


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In Non-UEFI machines, we can use GRUB2 to make USB stick bootable. Then, we can use 'ntldr' command in the GRUB2 to boot Windows from USB. menuentry 'Install Windows 8' { ntldr /bootmgr } See complete answer at my blog Creating a bootable windows USB from Linux


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.xz First, the last extension .xz is a lossless data compression program and file format which incorporates the LZMA/LZMA2 compression algorithms, say Wikipedia. Developed by The Tukaani Project. For use on Mac OS X, Appleā€™s Archive Utility.app cannot handle this format (as of Yosemite). The XZ project page suggests the XZ Utils library and command-line ...


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Start from disabling ACPI, if will not help - try 'Safe Mode' https://www.freebsd.org/doc/handbook/bsdinstall-start.html#bsdinstall-boot-options-menu If you wouldn't be able to boot even with safe mode (what is common for FreeBSD on laptops) - please post dmesg output from linux here.


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Select manual partitioning and create two new partitions in the free space: A small one (about 500 MB), which you format with a Linux file system (e.g. ext4). Select /boot as mount point for it. For the remaining space, choose "Use as: physical volume for encryption". Afterwards, go through the process of configuring encrypted volumes (in the top of the ...


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I have a Macbook 2006 running linux mint 17. The only thing you should do is start 32bit linux mint live CD and from the installation manager to delete all partitions you have on your macbook and create a new partition to install linux. Then reboot and install linux mint normally.


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I was able to get this to work by creating the live USB from a different computer. It seems that there is something wrong with the way Unetbootin runs on Manjaro, as even uninstalling and re-installing Unetbootin didn't do the trick (including its dependencies). In my case, I just had to create the live USB with Unetbootin on Windows 7.



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