New answers tagged

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I'm not sure why the firewire (fwip) interface is causing issues, but two things you might try, either of which should help: Go into the BIOS setup and disable the firewire interface Hit space to interrupt the NetBSD boot, then use boot -c to enter userconf at which point you should be able to disable fwip0 and then quit to continue the boot


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1) You can install Linux Os on your smartphone using Linux Deploy Install Linux Deploy from google play store enter link description here Description: This application is open source software for quick and easy installation of the operating system (OS) GNU/Linux on your Android device. The application creates a disk image on a flash card, mounts it and ...


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I was able to boot to USB on XServe G4. I was using the "memstick" bootable image I obtained from FreeBSD ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/powerpc/powerpc/ISO-IMAGES/10.2/ I inserted my USB stick into the first usb port (in OF, it is known as "usb0") Note, this has to be done directly for some reason; you can't insert the USB stick into a hub. ...


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Backup data on external drive and delete all the partitions,format the disk then start to install the OS whichever you want.


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An NTFS Easy2boot drive will boot multiple linux ISOs with persistence even if the linux being used does not support NTFS. You can even boot from an exFAT E2B drive to a linux distro that does not support exFAT. E2B creates a 4th partition on the E2B USB drive and 'maps' the ISO to that partition. When the ISO boots, it sees the 4th partition as having a ...


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That's an issue I had a lot with Linux Mint and Ubuntu, you should get the appropriate graphics driver, for amd it's fglrx (not updates) and for nvidia it's nvidia-current. Use apt-get install and the command line for installation. But before you do anything collect your graphic card's type and search for it. There may be another solution then.


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You need to disable secure boot from (BIOS) settings, because if secure boot is activated you can't boot from any cdrom or usb.


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Well, the problrm with *PIs is that you can only boot from SD Card. So you need any system installled on the sd card to boot. You can use the CoreFS from Ubuntu and add the rpi kernel to it. After that you can configure the whole system remotely. Here is an example for a BananaPi, you can modify it for RPI: https://endercoding.com/endercoding/bananapi-bsp


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BIOS : boot priority order you must chose cdrom ,secure boot must be disabled and mode of boot is legacy boot from cd and try to re-install grub sudo apt-get install --reinstall grub


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the easy way to create a custum debian CD is: install Simple-CDD via synaptic or package manager


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All of these answers work in some cases but not others. For example, you can depend on dmesg while boot-up log details are still in the ring buffer, but it will likely fail on a machine that has been running for any length of time. Worse, a message might be logged by the bare metal OS concerning a running hypervisor, in which case a naive test like dmesg | ...


2

Try this in login window: Username: root Password: password the "root" is exactly word "root", means root user the "password" is the password you created during installation. From: https://forums.kali.org/showthread.php?18428-Username-PW-login-failure-to-Kali-Linux


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Yes, you can install Linux to a drive without booting any kind of special installer. There are many ways to do this. First, you can manually partition the drive, create a filesystem onto it, create a working chroot, install the applications you want onto the drive (including, of course, a kernel, which you would want to compile fairly generically, or ...


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I mean you don't really give enough info for a real answer. Try mounting the / partition on your live USB to see if theres any data actually there, and if it does truly look like it really installed, try using a grub repair tool to see if your problems there. If that doesn't work try reinstalling the whole system I guess. Other than that I'm not sure if ...


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From #debian-boot on OFTC: 06:47 <musca> faheem: yes, the dvd series is much bigger, but only the first three images are available as http downloads. 06:50 <musca> for stretch the number of DVD images is 15 http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/weekly-builds/amd64/jigdo-dvd/ 06:55 <musca> faheem: let me point out: you really don't need ...


3

INSTALLING UBUNTU ALONGSIDE WINDOWS 10 Installing Linux is easy, requires no BIOS reconfig/secure boot nonsense. I've tested tested with both 14.04 LTS and 15.10. First build an Ubuntu install disk on a USB thumb drive (either 15.10 or 14.04 LTS). Boot into windows, use Disk Management utility to shrink Windows partition, reboot and boot from USB by ...


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This is how i solved my problem: Download another iso file : CentOS-5.4-x86_64-bin-DVD_1.iso, tried to create booable USB but couldn't work so write to DVD & installed successfully.


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I just ran into this issue when using cp -R . /var/ftp/pub/osdirectory and instead used (in mounted iso/DVD): find . | cpio -pmd /var/ftp/pub/osdirectory to copy the files over correctly



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