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Yes, it is possible, but quite complicated. However, your question does not supply enough information on the hardware used to be able to answer it completely. Especially since modern computers can be quite a pain in the neck when it comes to booting and partitioning (for instance, with UEFI). Essentially, using the different fdisk commands, create ...


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You are confusing a couple different concepts here. base is a package group. It's what many consider to be the “default” package set for an Arch Linux install (and many of the rest of Arch will assume that you have all of the packages in base installed—so this isn't really an incorrect assertion). On the other hand, core, extra and community are ...


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As I was attempting to install Kali 2.0 on VMware I was running into the same issue. Startx was not found, and even upon manually installing it would not work. The one thing that worked for me was to enable virtualization in bios. This is usually a problem that occurs with VirtualBox for me, but this time it resolves the issue with Kali 2.0 on VMware.


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You should download the archlinux-2015.08.01-dual.iso, or better yet, the archlinux-2015.08.01-dual.iso.torrent file and download Arch Linux via a P2P application. The 'dual' says that the ISO file is compatible for both x86_64 and i686 architecture computers. The bootstrap image in the mirror is used for installing Arch Linux on an existing Linux ...


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Yes, this is easily possible. You could copy every single file from your system to the USB flash drive, and then copy it over to the partition you desire to have it on. An easier method, which I recommend, would be to take a tarball of your entire system and then extract it to the partition you desire. The last thing you would need to do is make sure that ...


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Maybe it's a BIOS quirk with some bootloader configurations. Since the ArchBang bootloader works, download the linux and initrd.gz files into it from the 64-bit Debian netboot installer, and manually add a corresponding item to the ArchBang boot menu, or invoke them from the bootloader command line.


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Increase your virtual hard disk space to 12 GB or more. I faced similar issue and the above resolved my issue.


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The instructions you're following are written for CentOS 5, you'll need to use CentOS 5 for those instructions to work. BTW, CentOS 5 will be EOL March 31, 2017. There is another repo for CentOS 7 at http://downloads2.goautodial.org/centos/7/goautodial.repo but it has some dependency failures on stuff like grub (el7 uses grub2), php-eaccelerator (project ...


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To answer the title question: remote install with aptitude in a terminal. I use aptitude for all my local package-management because it's excellent. Powerful search, nice UI for managing dependencies. Lets you get a set of purges, upgrades, and installs lined up, and see what's going to happen before it happens. To manage the set of packages installed on ...


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The best thing to do would be as follows: 1- Write a bash script *.sh file with the installation commands 2- Use the scp command to copy the *.sh script along with any binary files needed to the target machine 3- Connect using ssh to the target machine and run the *.sh script Note: if you haven't used ssh before, you might have to install the ...


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I recommend you to introduce configuration management software like Ansible, Chef, CFEngine, etc. See also this Wikipedia article.


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As BrianM already explained, you should use the newest version of Fedora and the standart Workstation image. However, follow the instructions from the Fedora Documentation. The instructions how to verify the image with a hashsum are also important to avoid a corrupt image.


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My advice would be to download Fedora 22 Workstation installer from Fedora's site (https://getfedora.org/) and run it. Fedora 20 is a couple of years old and while it is certainly still usable, they have made improvements. As for the live usb creator, if my memory serves that creates an installable version on a usb device. I used it once a long time ago ...


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Yum will do that by default in Live mode; anything you install whilst running off a live optical disc is installed to RAM because you are running off of RAM as it is. If you want to do it explicitly, though, you can create a RAM disk: mkdir foo mount -t tmpfs -o size=4096M bar /foo where: mount is the command. -t tmpfs specifies the type of filesystem. ...


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FYI, I got it to work by not selecting the "Easy Install" or disconnecting the second CD-ROM drive that contains the autorun.iso (or whatever it's named),leaving just the CD-ROM drive that has the ISO. The installer starts right up.


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So using a combination of Lenovo's BIOS simulator (pretty neat: http://service.lenovo.partner-management.com/et.cfm?eid=1437) and Lenovo's manual for the machine, I was able to get the correct sequence of keystrokes to modify the "Boot Display Device" from LCD to analog VGA. In the rare event anyone faces exactly this problem, here is how to solve it: ...



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