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Vivian, you can easily do this by using VirtualBox or any kind of virtualization software. You will need to download the iso files to do this of course. I have included a link that shows (with images) how to install VirtualBox and use an ISO to create a virtual OS. Please look here. Hope this helps you.


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The first thing I would investigate is if you can cut down your custom distribution to fit on one DVD and install the rest from the net. If that would not work (no network), just keep track of the .deb packages you remove to size down and copy those to second DVD, and install them from there using dpkg.


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Based on the technical details page for that distro I'd assume it derives from Lubuntu. Lubuntu derives from Ubuntu, which derives from Debian. http://cylonlinux.weebly.com/technical-details.html excerpt Package Management : Debian Packager with APT Desktop Environment : Gnome Classic (also contains Unity & Gnome Shell) Kernel Version ...


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For automated installs of RHEL or distributions based on this, use Kickstart. When you build a RHEL server a /root/anaconda-ks.cfg file is created that can be used to build a duplicate host. There are various options, the two most suitable: 1. Custom Live CD / removable media build from the kiskstart image. 2. Full PXE boot network installation. The ...


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Fedora 20 install can resize a Windows partition, but it's kind of obscure. First, you need to have insufficient space on the selected drive. You then have to proceed with the installation, then Fedora will tell you the free space on the drive is too small but will offer custom partitioning or guided resizing. Click the latter button, and you'll get a nice ...


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Unfortunately Ubuntu for Android has been halted by now or at least until Canonical finds a suitable partner to bring it to phones. Maybe we'll finally see this becoming a reality with the 64bit smartphones on the horizon. Direct quote from Canonical: We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The ...


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Make sure to format your /boot partition to FAT32. It'll work flawlessly :)


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No, you don't need to partition a HDD into FAT32/FAT16 for any Linux distro installation. You have to format your drive into Linux supportable file systems. i.e. ext2,ext3,ext4,btrfs,rieserfs etc. As far as i remember you will have probably three options when you install Mint Linux to your hard disk. (the option could be different but the concept is same) ...


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It turns out the problem was with gdm not finding a screen because of some bios bug. A bios update solved the problem.


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So I don't know if it can help someone but I could find a way to make the installation worked ! To explain it briefly, you need to create your partition by using mdadm and gdisk. In my situation, both were not installed on my live USB key. One this is done, I create 2 newt gpt partition table on both disk (sda and sdb). Then I start to create partition on ...


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If your sister really just formatted the computer, her files are quite easy to recover because only the root of the directory structures is misssing. The most important thing is to immediately make an image of the harddisk to an external harddrive. DON'T repair the harddisk directly. You can do this easily with any Linux Live CD and and copy all data off ...


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Arch Wiki doesn't recommend using Unetbooting for writing ISO on a flash drive. Please, use # dd bs=4M if=/path/to/archlinux.iso of=/dev/sdx && sync for performing this operation under existing Linux, or find other options here


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You probably forgot to format your partitions first. Assuming /dev/sda is your hard drive (where you wish to install Arch) : $ fdisk /dev/sda [create your partitions using fdisk] More information about fdisk here. Then just use mkfs to format them all. Here are two examples creating ext4 filesystems. $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1 $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda2 $ # ... ...


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I had problems with several USB image writers, but Win32 Disk Imager worked for me.


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If checkinstall failed probably the package isn't installed, no need to remove, eventually try sudo dpkg -r <package-name>, and you can safely remove with rm intermediate files left in the directory. The version is important for dpkg/apt so you must use one, even a fake, if tomorrow a package with the same name enter the distro, the one with the newer ...



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