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2

Unfortunately Ubuntu for Android has been halted by now or at least until Canonical finds a suitable partner to bring it to phones. Maybe we'll finally see this becoming a reality with the 64bit smartphones on the horizon. Direct quote from Canonical: We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The ...


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Make sure to format your /boot partition to FAT32. It'll work flawlessly :)


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No, you don't need to partition a HDD into FAT32/FAT16 for any Linux distro installation. You have to format your drive into Linux supportable file systems. i.e. ext2,ext3,ext4,btrfs,rieserfs etc. As far as i remember you will have probably three options when you install Mint Linux to your hard disk. (the option could be different but the concept is same) ...


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It turns out the problem was with gdm not finding a screen because of some bios bug. A bios update solved the problem.


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So I don't know if it can help someone but I could find a way to make the installation worked ! To explain it briefly, you need to create your partition by using mdadm and gdisk. In my situation, both were not installed on my live USB key. One this is done, I create 2 newt gpt partition table on both disk (sda and sdb). Then I start to create partition on ...


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If your sister really just formatted the computer, her files are quite easy to recover because only the root of the directory structures is misssing. The most important thing is to immediately make an image of the harddisk to an external harddrive. DON'T repair the harddisk directly. You can do this easily with any Linux Live CD and and copy all data off ...


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Arch Wiki doesn't recommend using Unetbooting for writing ISO on a flash drive. Please, use # dd bs=4M if=/path/to/archlinux.iso of=/dev/sdx && sync for performing this operation under existing Linux, or find other options here


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You probably forgot to format your partitions first. Assuming /dev/sda is your hard drive (where you wish to install Arch) : $ fdisk /dev/sda [create your partitions using fdisk] More information about fdisk here. Then just use mkfs to format them all. Here are two examples creating ext4 filesystems. $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1 $ mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda2 $ # ... ...


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I had problems with several USB image writers, but Win32 Disk Imager worked for me.


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If checkinstall failed probably the package isn't installed, no need to remove, eventually try sudo dpkg -r <package-name>, and you can safely remove with rm intermediate files left in the directory. The version is important for dpkg/apt so you must use one, even a fake, if tomorrow a package with the same name enter the distro, the one with the newer ...


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One needs to edit the isolinux/isolinux.cfg and set the timeout to 1 for example, and also set the default install accordingly.


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I'm not sure what this has to do with UEFI, as I've never heard of any Linux distro that won't still boot via BIOS. Just download an ISO image of the distro you wish to install, and use something like Rufus to "burn" it to a USB flash drive.


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According to the website http://sources.debian.net/src/simple-cdd/0.5.0/README/ to preseed these answers, you should pass the --locale parameter to the build-simple-cdd command Language and Country Selection to pre-select the language and country, it is recommended to use the --locale commandline option: build-simple-cdd --locale en_US



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