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29

Yes! This is a big deal, and incredibly common. And there are two basic approaches. One way is simply with scripted installs, as for example used in Fedora, RHEL, or CentOS's kickstart. Check this out in the Fedora install guide: Kickstart Installations. For your simple case, this may be sufficient. (Take this as an example; there are similar systems for ...


6

Just install normally. You can boot from your USB and follow the steps of the installer. You can either create a partition manually before installing or use the tools provided by the Mint installer to partition during the installation process. The only thing you really have to worry about is when the installer asks you whether to install a boot loader ...


5

I didn't want to disable Intel(R) Smart response Technology as it does offer performance improvement. Changing the BIOS to get rid of the raid setup would have done just this. The bulk of my resolution came from this Super User answer here. how-do-i-install-windows-7-with-intel-rst-and-linux-to-dual-boot-on-a-dell-xps Mine differed in a few ways though - ...


4

Make sure to format your /boot partition to FAT32. It'll work flawlessly :)


4

Arch uses two tiers of mirrors; the first, Tier 1, syncs directly from archlinux.org every hour. Tier 2 mirrors sync from Tier 1. Synching from archlinux.org directly is prohibited. This ensures that bandwidth charges are equitably distributed amongst the various mirrors and that people in diverse geographic locations are not penalized with slow downloads ...


4

That's a bug in debian-installer-launcher; it stores the wrong values for the distribution name and version. The live CD does contain Jessie, and that's what will be installed (even though the icon and menu entry say "Install Debian sid"). You can verify this by checking the following in a terminal started from the live CD: cat /etc/debian_version ...


4

You should boot into Windows and resize one of the partitions. The tool is at Control Panel -> System and Maintenance -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management and there under Storage -> Disk Management. After this you can install Linux Mint into the empty space.


3

If you are in arch-chroot mode you should run grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg other than grub-mkconfig -o /mnt/boot/grub/grub.cfg Because: When you are installing arch linux for the first time, you mount your file system in /mnt and install base system from outside. Once you're done with base packages, you can arch-chroot inside /mnt and all the ...


3

A WUBI setup is... Easier to install (on older systems - UEFI users sometimes have issues) Doesn't require a new bootloader (which Windows can munch) Doesn't require repartitioning your Windows drives to make room Is slower than native because it's one step removed from hardware Can still get munched by Windows. Windows will ultimately do whatever Windows ...


3

You can use a tool called Linux Live USB Creator (this is to create the USB from Windows). It will create a live USB and will let you specify a space for permanent data that will be kept from run to run. This is called the Persistence File. Or you can create a the whole system in your USB. The way I did that was installing Debian on a machine (I think you ...


3

It is also possible to setup a Proxy DHCP service for PXE. Thus, the existing DHCP server does not need to be changed. A normal Linux system (e.g. a workstation) can then be used to host the preboot execution environment (PXE). Following steps are necessary to setup a PXE for net-booting a Fedora network install image (assuming also a Fedora host): Verify ...


3

I might unfortunately decide to use Windows as the host operating system so that my non-Unixy colleagues would not be at a disadvantage - being able to leverage their existing knowledge - and to use the Windows application as needed without waiting for the Linux operations to cease. I would install Linux (RHEL probably, given the choices) in a virtual ...


3

The three block devices are logical volumes in an LVM volume group, fedora. swap is used for swap (spill-over for RAM), home is used to store all your personal data, and root is used for everything else (programs, system configuration, system logs...). There are good reasons for these three devices to be separate: swap works better as a separate block ...


3

If you want to be supported by any contingent of the Arch Linux community, there are only two guides you can use to install Arch: The Beginners' Guide and The Official Installation Guide. Any other guide/script/tutorial used is not supported and never will be. Now then, that is not to say that you cannot use those scripts, but if you do, you are ...


3

The main requirement for files provided by a distribution is that they allow users to boot a computer using the distribution (either as a live system or an installation system, or both). On PCs, it's commonly understood that to allow booting a single image on as many systems as possible, the best approach is a combined El Torito/EFI image; this can be ...


3

I managed to solve my problem with debootstrap, here is a quick run-down of the process I followed. unmount usb Partition the USB (4GB) Zap out GPT with gdisk, as my board didn't want to boot GPT. Created just one linux partition, nothing else. I had lots of problems getting a usb drive bootable on my embedded system. mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb1 mount ...


3

Yum will do that by default in Live mode; anything you install whilst running off a live optical disc is installed to RAM because you are running off of RAM as it is. If you want to do it explicitly, though, you can create a RAM disk: mkdir foo mount -t tmpfs -o size=4096M bar /foo where: mount is the command. -t tmpfs specifies the type of filesystem. ...


2

/dev/root is missing. This can often be caused by a mismatched label or /dev/sdXx root device when booting from USB. When the dracut shell becomes available, create a directory: mkdir /mnt/ Mount different block devices until you have found the one that contains the USB installer(this typically doesn't happen on true/Virt CDROM mounts). Once you find ...


2

Unfortunately Ubuntu for Android has been halted by now or at least until Canonical finds a suitable partner to bring it to phones. Maybe we'll finally see this becoming a reality with the 64bit smartphones on the horizon. Direct quote from Canonical: We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The ...


2

One needs to edit the isolinux/isolinux.cfg and set the timeout to 1 for example, and also set the default install accordingly.


2

Yes! This is what debootstap is for — at least in Debian-derived distributions like Ubuntu. There are great, straightforward instructions for doing (almost) exactly what you're looking for on the Ubuntu wiki: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/DebootstrapChroot. This has some important steps for bind mounting /proc/, /dev/ and /sys/ which you'll need for the chroot ...


2

If your sister really just formatted the computer, her files are quite easy to recover because only the root of the directory structures is misssing. The most important thing is to immediately make an image of the harddisk to an external harddrive. DON'T repair the harddisk directly. You can do this easily with any Linux Live CD and and copy all data off ...


2

The everything ISO contains all packages, but they are still arranged in the normal category lists. So it does not install everything by default, you have to install specific packages/categories that you would like to have available. It is mostly so you can install whatever you need on a disconnected computer or install the system before connecting to the ...


2

Question: 1. Why is rootnoverify not found? rootnoverify is a command for the grub shell you get when you first boot not for bash. By the time you boot into the OS it's too late to run that command. If you're already in the OS you might try adding something like this: title Windows OS rootnoverify (hd0,0) chainloader +1 To your ...


2

A Linux distribution such as Arch isn't really a single piece of software; instead, it's a collection of many different programs by many different authors. The maintainers of each distribution select what software to include and compile it, configure it all to work well together, and then bundle it as an operating system (this process is called packaging, ...


2

Off the top of my head: All user home directories. Nuke it. Clear the command history for root. Clean out /var/log. Any sensitive networking information. Any configuration files for programs on the box that contains personal information. Any paid programs, movies, or music. Any browser data. Edit: for servers specifically: Any httpd files that ...


2

Original host (or another similar freshly installed distro): getfacl -R / > permissions.acl your host: setfacl --restore=permissions.acl from here


2

Overview It’s probably easier to just reinstall. I know you want to avoid that, but it’s the only way to be sure that you don’t delete the wrong files. What follows below will mainly just show you how error-prone and time-intensive it is to try deleting everything otherwise. Ways to try making it work The steps below are just an idea. Don’t go deleting ...


2

Increase your virtual hard disk space to 12 GB or more. I faced similar issue and the above resolved my issue.


2

Sure you can shrink the partition size of preinstalled windows and install linux debian or ubuntu as your wish side by side with the windows. Grub bootloader will help you to boot OS properly. For some persons, installing VM is NOT THE answer, it is depend on the Need. I personally have been using linux for about 8 years, 6 years on gentoo and last two years ...



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