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29

Yes! This is a big deal, and incredibly common. And there are two basic approaches. One way is simply with scripted installs, as for example used in Fedora, RHEL, or CentOS's kickstart. Check this out in the Fedora install guide: Kickstart Installations. For your simple case, this may be sufficient. (Take this as an example; there are similar systems for ...


8

This is possible for syslinux: syslinux ~/floppy.ima The syslinux installer contains enough magic to be run on an unmounted filesystem. (In fact, it is designed to do that.) The extlinux installer expects to be run on a mounted filesystem, though. It is almost certainly possible to split off the extlinux installer into a part that copies the files ...


7

Quite simple. 8GB isn't enough for this version of Kali Linux. Use VBoxManage to resize the virtual disk, and GParted to expand the filesystem.


7

From the Fedora web site, you will need around 10 GB disk space during install. You will probably want more, though, if you are going to have large packages (like LaTeX, games, etc...). 20~30 GB won't hurt and should be enough for most users.


6

I'm one of the Anaconda authors/maintainers. I could go into way too much detail about how the installer boots, but I'll try to be brief. (Note that this only applies to RHEL/CentOS 6.x or Fedora 14 and earlier; the installer was almost completely rewritten between Fedora 15, 16, and 17, so things are very different now.) How does Anaconda get ...


6

I think you must make bootable usb using dd command (if your iso is in home directory): First unmount (not eject) the usb: sudo umount /dev/sdb1 Then, write the image to the disk: sudo dd bs=4M if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-Everything.iso of=/dev/sdb Then it will not show /dev/root does not exist.


6

Just install normally. You can boot from your USB and follow the steps of the installer. You can either create a partition manually before installing or use the tools provided by the Mint installer to partition during the installation process. The only thing you really have to worry about is when the installer asks you whether to install a boot loader ...


5

If you add a line in /etc/fstab saying something like: /dev/loop0 /mnt ext4 defaults,user 0 0 you can then mount/unmount /dev/loop0 as a regular user. And if you do chown youruser:youruser <MOUNTPOINT> <LOOPDEVICE> then extlinux , losetup, mkfs, etc can be done as youruser.


5

I didn't want to disable Intel(R) Smart response Technology as it does offer performance improvement. Changing the BIOS to get rid of the raid setup would have done just this. The bulk of my resolution came from this Super User answer here. how-do-i-install-windows-7-with-intel-rst-and-linux-to-dual-boot-on-a-dell-xps Mine differed in a few ways though - ...


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


4

Of course the primary goal is not to have the need to use swap in the first place... The main thing is to create the swap LVM volume when the system is still quite fresh, the same as when you create a swap file, as swap space performs best when it is contiguous. You don't want to actual disk blocks that make up the logical volume to be fragmented all over ...


4

Arch uses two tiers of mirrors; the first, Tier 1, syncs directly from archlinux.org every hour. Tier 2 mirrors sync from Tier 1. Synching from archlinux.org directly is prohibited. This ensures that bandwidth charges are equitably distributed amongst the various mirrors and that people in diverse geographic locations are not penalized with slow downloads ...


3

I think minimum is 8-10 Gb, because there is lot of updates after installation.


3

Boot your machine with a live CD, mount your hard drive, chroot to your hard drive and change password. Reboot without the live CD, now your new password should give you access.


3

When the install is done, and before rebooting, edit /mnt/etc/fstab (the installed system's root is mounted under /mnt during install).


3

On Linux you can use the command virt-what [root@myhost]# virt-what vmware


3

That depends on when exactly you will do this and what is required to install the driver. The most likely answer is no, it won't be a problem. When a live CD is booted, an initial ramdisk is first loaded which contains most of the tools necessary to run your system. If you are at a prompt, these tools are already loaded and you should be able to remove the ...


3

For the most part, yes it is the same. The real differences you'll encounter when doing this as a host OS (compared to a client VM OS) is that VMs emulate very common hardware. If you real machine uses less common hardware you may need to install drivers which aren't usually needed in a VM. The other difference is going to be your hard drive setup. In a VM ...


3

Example using wget (for downloading), bfr (for buffering), and growisofs for burning: wget -q -O - http://somewhere/image.iso \ | bfr -b 512m -p -i 100% -m 10% -t 120 -T 95% \ | growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/cdrom=/dev/fd/0 The buffering part is optional, but without it you will have to rely on your drive to cope with buffer underruns. That doesn't work ...


3

Use Win32 Disk Imager on Windows or dd to write the ISO to the USB stick on Linux/OSX. dd if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-NetInstall.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=8m I've recently used the first and it booted fine after doing that.


3

Yes. During installation, on the Desktop Selection page, choose Other, then Minimal Server Selection (Text Mode).


3

the pages at https://tails.boum.org/download/index.en.html#index3h1 explain the process of verifying that the image you download has the expected checksum, the process of verifying that the checksum you read on the website is signed by the distributor, the process of have reasonable evidence that the key you downloaded is indeed not a malicious one. To be ...


3

A WUBI setup is... Easier to install (on older systems - UEFI users sometimes have issues) Doesn't require a new bootloader (which Windows can munch) Doesn't require repartitioning your Windows drives to make room Is slower than native because it's one step removed from hardware Can still get munched by Windows. Windows will ultimately do whatever Windows ...


3

You can use a tool called Linux Live USB Creator (this is to create the USB from Windows). It will create a live USB and will let you specify a space for permanent data that will be kept from run to run. This is called the Persistence File. Or you can create a the whole system in your USB. The way I did that was installing Debian on a machine (I think you ...


3

It is also possible to setup a Proxy DHCP service for PXE. Thus, the existing DHCP server does not need to be changed. A normal Linux system (e.g. a workstation) can then be used to host the preboot execution environment (PXE). Following steps are necessary to setup a PXE for net-booting a Fedora network install image (assuming also a Fedora host): Verify ...


2

Unfortunately Ubuntu for Android has been halted by now or at least until Canonical finds a suitable partner to bring it to phones. Maybe we'll finally see this becoming a reality with the 64bit smartphones on the horizon. Direct quote from Canonical: We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The ...


2

Enable developer mode and legacy boot (you'll find a lot of tutorials) and then you can install via USB-Stick. Worked fine for me ( http://blog.mdosch.de/2013/12/04/debian-gnulinux-auf-dem-chromebook-acer-c720-installieren/ - german) But to get the touchpad working in debian I had to rebuilt the kernel. You can find it there: ...


2

As the comment above states (from cnst), UDRW appears to be Apple/mac/OSX proprietary. I had to convert to "UDTO - DVD/CD-R master for export" to make the USB bootable on other machines. When dd is finished in this case OSX (Mavericks) complains that it cannot read the disk/USB in this format which kinda confirms it. Also, unetbootin for OSX does not work ...


2

I found a way to get around the problem, try this as it worked for me: in the terminal type sudo su it will ask for your userpassword and make you root/superuser some operating systems do not like you to login as root


2

The easiest way to edit a file from the terminal for a beginner is to use nano. To start nano and open a file: nano path/to/file When you are in nano, you can use Ctrl+G to get help, Ctrl+O to save the file and Ctrl+X to exit nano. These are listed at the bottom of the screen but with the ^ character for Ctrl. This beginner's guide to nano might be ...



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