Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

29

Yes! This is a big deal, and incredibly common. And there are two basic approaches. One way is simply with scripted installs, as for example used in Fedora, RHEL, or CentOS's kickstart. Check this out in the Fedora install guide: Kickstart Installations. For your simple case, this may be sufficient. (Take this as an example; there are similar systems for ...


9

Quite simple. 8GB isn't enough for this version of Kali Linux. Use VBoxManage to resize the virtual disk, and GParted to expand the filesystem.


8

I think you must make bootable usb using dd command (if your iso is in home directory): First unmount (not eject) the usb: sudo umount /dev/sdb1 Then, write the image to the disk: sudo dd bs=4M if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-Everything.iso of=/dev/sdb Then it will not show /dev/root does not exist.


6

Just install normally. You can boot from your USB and follow the steps of the installer. You can either create a partition manually before installing or use the tools provided by the Mint installer to partition during the installation process. The only thing you really have to worry about is when the installer asks you whether to install a boot loader ...


5

Of course the primary goal is not to have the need to use swap in the first place... The main thing is to create the swap LVM volume when the system is still quite fresh, the same as when you create a swap file, as swap space performs best when it is contiguous. You don't want to actual disk blocks that make up the logical volume to be fragmented all over ...


5

I didn't want to disable Intel(R) Smart response Technology as it does offer performance improvement. Changing the BIOS to get rid of the raid setup would have done just this. The bulk of my resolution came from this Super User answer here. how-do-i-install-windows-7-with-intel-rst-and-linux-to-dual-boot-on-a-dell-xps Mine differed in a few ways though - ...


4

Make sure to format your /boot partition to FAT32. It'll work flawlessly :)


4

Arch uses two tiers of mirrors; the first, Tier 1, syncs directly from archlinux.org every hour. Tier 2 mirrors sync from Tier 1. Synching from archlinux.org directly is prohibited. This ensures that bandwidth charges are equitably distributed amongst the various mirrors and that people in diverse geographic locations are not penalized with slow downloads ...


3

Yes. During installation, on the Desktop Selection page, choose Other, then Minimal Server Selection (Text Mode).


3

Use Win32 Disk Imager on Windows or dd to write the ISO to the USB stick on Linux/OSX. dd if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-NetInstall.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=8m I've recently used the first and it booted fine after doing that.


3

I have not installed CentOS 7 myself yet, but you can try linuxefi /images/pxeboot/vmlinuz inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=CentOS\x207\x20x86_64 quiet nomodeset i.e: append 'nomodeset' If that works, I would blacklist Nouveau after install.


3

Example using wget (for downloading), bfr (for buffering), and growisofs for burning: wget -q -O - http://somewhere/image.iso \ | bfr -b 512m -p -i 100% -m 10% -t 120 -T 95% \ | growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/cdrom=/dev/fd/0 The buffering part is optional, but without it you will have to rely on your drive to cope with buffer underruns. That doesn't work ...


3

As the comment above states (from cnst), UDRW appears to be Apple/mac/OSX proprietary. I had to convert to "UDTO - DVD/CD-R master for export" to make the USB bootable on other machines. When dd is finished in this case OSX (Mavericks) complains that it cannot read the disk/USB in this format which kinda confirms it. Also, unetbootin for OSX does not work ...


3

For the most part, yes it is the same. The real differences you'll encounter when doing this as a host OS (compared to a client VM OS) is that VMs emulate very common hardware. If you real machine uses less common hardware you may need to install drivers which aren't usually needed in a VM. The other difference is going to be your hard drive setup. In a VM ...


3

Boot your machine with a live CD, mount your hard drive, chroot to your hard drive and change password. Reboot without the live CD, now your new password should give you access.


3

When the install is done, and before rebooting, edit /mnt/etc/fstab (the installed system's root is mounted under /mnt during install).


3

the pages at https://tails.boum.org/download/index.en.html#index3h1 explain the process of verifying that the image you download has the expected checksum, the process of verifying that the checksum you read on the website is signed by the distributor, the process of have reasonable evidence that the key you downloaded is indeed not a malicious one. To be ...


3

A WUBI setup is... Easier to install (on older systems - UEFI users sometimes have issues) Doesn't require a new bootloader (which Windows can munch) Doesn't require repartitioning your Windows drives to make room Is slower than native because it's one step removed from hardware Can still get munched by Windows. Windows will ultimately do whatever Windows ...


3

If you are in arch-chroot mode you should run grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg other than grub-mkconfig -o /mnt/boot/grub/grub.cfg Because: When you are installing arch linux for the first time, you mount your file system in /mnt and install base system from outside. Once you're done with base packages, you can arch-chroot inside /mnt and all the ...


3

You can use a tool called Linux Live USB Creator (this is to create the USB from Windows). It will create a live USB and will let you specify a space for permanent data that will be kept from run to run. This is called the Persistence File. Or you can create a the whole system in your USB. The way I did that was installing Debian on a machine (I think you ...


3

It is also possible to setup a Proxy DHCP service for PXE. Thus, the existing DHCP server does not need to be changed. A normal Linux system (e.g. a workstation) can then be used to host the preboot execution environment (PXE). Following steps are necessary to setup a PXE for net-booting a Fedora network install image (assuming also a Fedora host): Verify ...


3

That's a bug in debian-installer-launcher; it stores the wrong values for the distribution name and version. The live CD does contain Jessie, and that's what will be installed (even though the icon and menu entry say "Install Debian sid"). You can verify this by checking the following in a terminal started from the live CD: cat /etc/debian_version ...


3

I might unfortunately decide to use Windows as the host operating system so that my non-Unixy colleagues would not be at a disadvantage - being able to leverage their existing knowledge - and to use the Windows application as needed without waiting for the Linux operations to cease. I would install Linux (RHEL probably, given the choices) in a virtual ...


3

The three block devices are logical volumes in an LVM volume group, fedora. swap is used for swap (spill-over for RAM), home is used to store all your personal data, and root is used for everything else (programs, system configuration, system logs...). There are good reasons for these three devices to be separate: swap works better as a separate block ...


2

Unfortunately Ubuntu for Android has been halted by now or at least until Canonical finds a suitable partner to bring it to phones. Maybe we'll finally see this becoming a reality with the 64bit smartphones on the horizon. Direct quote from Canonical: We still believe that U4A is a great product concept and that consumers would welcome the feature. The ...


2

Run: $ dmesg |grep -i hypervisor Hypervisor detected: KVM


2

For what it concerns Ubuntu you can search to follow what in Portable installed system that boots in UEFI as well as BIOS mode. You can find instructions on how to make an installed system (typically in a USB pendrive) that works with UEFI and BIOS, and is small enough to work in an undersized 8 GB pendrive (7.8 GB). So in a 16 it will be large ;-) The ...


2

Ok, so here's the way the boot process works: firmware > bootloader maybe > kernel ${parameters} > initramfs > userspace maybe On a redhat installation disk their dracut system of scripts is what builds and constitutes initramfs and their anaconda installation system constitutes the final userspace. It is udev that handles the device setup - as in, it ...


2

go into the BIOS of the host and rearrange the order of the hard drives and removable drives. This will adjust the order as it appears to the Linux kernel.


2

The debconf question partman-partitioning/default_label should set the partition table type. You also need to set the boolean question partman-partitioning/confirm_write_new_label to true or partman will not overrite an existing partition table. So you should put in your pressed file : d-i partman-partitioning/default_label select msdos d-i ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible