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14

/dev/sda2 is an extended partition. /dev/sda5 is an logical partition which is placed inside the extended partition. Originally there could be only 4 partitions on a hard disk. To circumvent this, the extended partition was invented and further partitions, so called logical partitions, could be created inside the extended partition. The partitions 1-4 are ...


8

Increase your virtual hard disk space to 12 GB or more. I faced similar issue and the above resolved my issue.


7

Yes, you can accomplish this by adding a menu entry to the GRUB boot loader menu. You can add a custom GRUB menu entry by editing /etc/grub.d/40_custom, Example of custom menuentry: exec tail -n +3 $0 # This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries. Simply type the # menu entries you want to add after this comment. Be careful not to change ...


7

The Wheezy changelog lists all the package updates in each point release. This shows that Debian 7.7 was released with 3.2.63-2, while Debian 7.8 was released with version 3.2.65-1. So you won't find an installer image with the exact version you're looking for. But you can find the relevant kernel packages in the snapshots; this will allow you to install ...


6

It depends on which boot-loader was installed. If its a standard Debian install it should be GRUB2. Boot the computer with all disks containing bootable installations attached and powered. you need to open Root Terminal application to open a terminal as root. then enter this commands. apt-get update apt-get install os-prober if os-prober package is ...


5

Unix System V is from 1983. There is a pretty good chance that the disk image you have is not even for Intel x86 architectures and won't work at all on your system or emulator, let alone other hardware driver incompatibilities. Maybe if you used one of the alternate qemu architectures. But most likely you'd need to get your hands on compatible hardware that ...


5

As far as I know, installing on a headless computer is something which can be done using a variety of tricks. The first of the following suggestions uses accessibility features to compensate for the lack of screen. The second one is the easy way to pretend you know the exact sequence of keys to press. The third and fourth are one of many possibilities for ...


4

/dev/root is missing. This can often be caused by a mismatched label or /dev/sdXx root device when booting from USB. When the dracut shell becomes available, create a directory: mkdir /mnt/ Mount different block devices until you have found the one that contains the USB installer(this typically doesn't happen on true/Virt CDROM mounts). Once you find ...


4

You should boot into Windows and resize one of the partitions. The tool is at Control Panel -> System and Maintenance -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management and there under Storage -> Disk Management. After this you can install Linux Mint into the empty space.


4

If you want to be supported by any contingent of the Arch Linux community, there are only two guides you can use to install Arch: The Beginners' Guide and The Official Installation Guide. Any other guide/script/tutorial used is not supported and never will be. Now then, that is not to say that you cannot use those scripts, but if you do, you are ...


4

The netinst liveUSB does not include any GUI. As far as I know, you have two options: (1) install the current core system, and install a graphical user manager afterwards, or (2) install another version of debian which contains a GUI on the USB. (1) - Install the core system and install a graphical environment - this could be: Gnome, KDE, Xfce or ay other. ...


4

INSTALLING UBUNTU ALONGSIDE WINDOWS 10 Installing Linux is easy, requires no BIOS reconfig/secure boot nonsense. I've tested tested with both 14.04 LTS and 15.10. First build an Ubuntu install disk on a USB thumb drive (either 15.10 or 14.04 LTS). Boot into windows, use Disk Management utility to shrink Windows partition, reboot and boot from USB by ...


3

Yum will do that by default in Live mode; anything you install whilst running off a live optical disc is installed to RAM because you are running off of RAM as it is. If you want to do it explicitly, though, you can create a RAM disk: mkdir foo mount -t tmpfs -o size=4096M bar /foo where: mount is the command. -t tmpfs specifies the type of filesystem. ...


3

I managed to solve my problem with debootstrap, here is a quick run-down of the process I followed. unmount usb Partition the USB (4GB) Zap out GPT with gdisk, as my board didn't want to boot GPT. Created just one linux partition, nothing else. I had lots of problems getting a usb drive bootable on my embedded system. mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb1 mount ...


3

The main requirement for files provided by a distribution is that they allow users to boot a computer using the distribution (either as a live system or an installation system, or both). On PCs, it's commonly understood that to allow booting a single image on as many systems as possible, the best approach is a combined El Torito/EFI image; this can be ...


3

I might unfortunately decide to use Windows as the host operating system so that my non-Unixy colleagues would not be at a disadvantage - being able to leverage their existing knowledge - and to use the Windows application as needed without waiting for the Linux operations to cease. I would install Linux (RHEL probably, given the choices) in a virtual ...


3

The three block devices are logical volumes in an LVM volume group, fedora. swap is used for swap (spill-over for RAM), home is used to store all your personal data, and root is used for everything else (programs, system configuration, system logs...). There are good reasons for these three devices to be separate: swap works better as a separate block ...


3

This worked better for me as it gives me specific information about the manufacturer and the product name. dmidecode -t system|grep 'Manufacturer\|Product' Output on Dell server: Manufacturer: Dell Inc. Product Name: PowerEdge C5220 Output on Virtualbox VM: Manufacturer: innotek GmbH Product Name: VirtualBox Output on KVM/QEMU: Manufacturer: QEMU ...


3

Correct, there's an option in the installer. Once you select "Desktop environment", you can choose which one you'd like. For reference also see here: https://wiki.debian.org/Xfce#How_to_install_Xfce In the text installer, it looks like this (if you select "Desktop environment" you get the choice), don't have a screenshot of the GUI installer at hand...


3

Yes, you should be able to "just shrink the Ubuntu drive, and overwrite with linux Mint with no Grub issues" if you are using the GPT partition table format and if your partitions are addressed using the partition GUIDs (maybe have a look at /boot/grub/grub.cfg just to be clear). Otherwise you might have to refresh the grub configuration (run a grub ...


3

You can do that if you will put all necessary for overwriting programs into tmpfs and execute them from there. Risky, and you should have backup handy if something wents wrong.


3

The Linux kernel is able to load almost every driver it needs at runtime. Distros like Debian typically build modules for every piece of hardware that might be encountered so if you just install Linux on the HDD and plug it into the laptop it will probably work. The only issue I've had doing something similar recently was for a computer that had an old ...


3

From #debian-boot on OFTC: 06:47 <musca> faheem: yes, the dvd series is much bigger, but only the first three images are available as http downloads. 06:50 <musca> for stretch the number of DVD images is 15 http://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/weekly-builds/amd64/jigdo-dvd/ 06:55 <musca> faheem: let me point out: you really don't need ...


3

You could build a PXE Boot server. You can do this using several operating systems, including Debian. PC2 is configured as a PXE Boot server, potentially using resources from the ISO image. PC1 is then configured in the BIOS to boot from those resources. There's a lot of stuff required on PC2 to support this, and PC1 needs to support network booting from ...


3

To get the smallest possible system, follow the instructions you linked to, but specify --variant=minbase on the debootstrap command line. This will install only apt, essential packages and their dependencies. You will always end up with packages not flagged as "Essential": some of the dependencies of essential packages aren't themselves "Essential" (they ...


3

You could: start the computer with both disks attached, boot into (your currently only choice) Debian run update-grub It should detect Windows on the first Disk, and add an entry to the boot-loader choices. And you could then optionally install grub also to the other disk boot sector by running grub-install /dev/sdb sdb is what I assume to be the ...


2

I was able to boot to USB on XServe G4. I was using the "memstick" bootable image I obtained from FreeBSD ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/powerpc/powerpc/ISO-IMAGES/10.2/ I inserted my USB stick into the first usb port (in OF, it is known as "usb0") Note, this has to be done directly for some reason; you can't insert the USB stick into a hub. ...


2

From Arch Linux: Currently we have official packages optimized for the i686 and x86-64 architectures https://www.archlinux.org/download/ In other words, the same download will work for both 64-bit and 32-bit operating systems.


2

Try this in login window: Username: root Password: password the "root" is exactly word "root", means root user the "password" is the password you created during installation. From: https://forums.kali.org/showthread.php?18428-Username-PW-login-failure-to-Kali-Linux


2

Fixed this along time ago, thought I posted it on here. All I needed to do was to install the OS as one partition, some reason it formatted the other directors the wrong size.



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