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28

Yes! This is a big deal, and incredibly common. And there are two basic approaches. One way is simply with scripted installs, as for example used in Fedora, RHEL, or CentOS's kickstart. Check this out in the Fedora install guide: Kickstart Installations. For your simple case, this may be sufficient. (Take this as an example; there are similar systems for ...


16

Is this not how to set up a swap file? I think you missed a step in between chmod and swapon: mkswap /mnt/sda2/swapfile As for the oxymoromic error... swapon: /mnt/sda2/swapfile: read swap header failed: Success What this literally means is there's a bug in the swapon code, but not necessarily one related to its primary functioning. C library ...


11

tune2fs You can use the command tune2fs to find out when the filesystem was created. $ tune2fs -l /dev/main/partition |grep 'Filesystem created' Example $ sudo tune2fs -l /dev/dm-1 |grep 'Filesystem created' Filesystem created: Sat Dec 7 20:42:03 2013 which disk to use? If you don't have /dev/dm-1 you can use the command blkid to determine ...


8

This is possible for syslinux: syslinux ~/floppy.ima The syslinux installer contains enough magic to be run on an unmounted filesystem. (In fact, it is designed to do that.) The extlinux installer expects to be run on a mounted filesystem, though. It is almost certainly possible to split off the extlinux installer into a part that copies the files ...


7

From the Fedora web site, you will need around 10 GB disk space during install. You will probably want more, though, if you are going to have large packages (like LaTeX, games, etc...). 20~30 GB won't hurt and should be enough for most users.


6

I think you must make bootable usb using dd command (if your iso is in home directory): First unmount (not eject) the usb: sudo umount /dev/sdb1 Then, write the image to the disk: sudo dd bs=4M if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-Everything.iso of=/dev/sdb Then it will not show /dev/root does not exist.


6

Just install normally. You can boot from your USB and follow the steps of the installer. You can either create a partition manually before installing or use the tools provided by the Mint installer to partition during the installation process. The only thing you really have to worry about is when the installer asks you whether to install a boot loader ...


5

I'm one of the Anaconda authors/maintainers. I could go into way too much detail about how the installer boots, but I'll try to be brief. (Note that this only applies to RHEL/CentOS 6.x or Fedora 14 and earlier; the installer was almost completely rewritten between Fedora 15, 16, and 17, so things are very different now.) How does Anaconda get ...


5

If you add a line in /etc/fstab saying something like: /dev/loop0 /mnt ext4 defaults,user 0 0 you can then mount/unmount /dev/loop0 as a regular user. And if you do chown youruser:youruser <MOUNTPOINT> <LOOPDEVICE> then extlinux , losetup, mkfs, etc can be done as youruser.


5

I didn't want to disable Intel(R) Smart response Technology as it does offer performance improvement. Changing the BIOS to get rid of the raid setup would have done just this. The bulk of my resolution came from this Super User answer here. how-do-i-install-windows-7-with-intel-rst-and-linux-to-dual-boot-on-a-dell-xps Mine differed in a few ways though - ...


4

I believe Logical Volume Manager will do this for you... I have never tried it on SSD's but I don't see why it would not work. install command "apt-get install lvm2" Here is the user guide. http://linuxconfig.org/linux-lvm-logical-volume-manager


4

You are right, even with minimal installation, the current FreeBSD requires a minimum of 600 MB, especially if you go for a amd64 release. There is still some options left: Using an "old" 7.x or 8.x (i386) release I tried to install an "old" 7.3 (i386) with everything to minimal and it took 270 MB. Assuming your machine is old enough, you will not care ...


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


3

You have to Convert the ISO to UDRW format using: hdiutil convert -format UDRW -o destination_file.img source_file.iso for Further steps and reference click this link, go with the steps: Create bootable USB stick from ISO in Mac OS X


3

From the CentOS 6.0 Release Notes: 4. Known Issues The text installer has limited capabilities compared to the GUI installer. Most notably there is no support for configuring partition layout, storage methods or package selection. Please refer to the official documentation for details. Here you can find some useful information on creating and using ...


3

I find it very hard to believe that the Fedora installer does not offer this option. In fact, according to this it does. It is probably hidden in an "Advanced" tab somewhere, look around for "Manual partitioning" or similar. Another option would be to resize your partition using something like PartedMagic which will allow you to boot into a live session ...


3

When the install is done, and before rebooting, edit /mnt/etc/fstab (the installed system's root is mounted under /mnt during install).


3

You basically have 2 choices if you want to install an alternative OS. ChrUbuntu (traditional dual boot) Crouton (side by side) NOTE: you'll need to enable developer mode, so you'll be forgoing verified boot. These 2 tutorials should get you started. Acer C720 Chromebook How to Install Ubuntu Linux on Your Chromebook with Crouton


3

Since partition E: is, and partition and F: is almost empty, you should (under Windows) move what data you need that is on F: to C: and then delete the E: and F: partitions. That way you create space for a 350Gb+ partition for Linux, which I think should be enough for any DVD install.


3

I want to ensure I have enough swap space to hibernate, what are the simplest steps to achieve this? You'll want at least as much swap space as you have RAM. I'd recommend 50% more if you are used to using most of your memory, since while I have not found any official number, I seem to recall it refusing to work occasionally when they are roughly equal ...


3

What you need to understand about initramfs is that it is a filesystem. Since kernel 2.6 it is, basically, the only kernel-imposed filesystem ( leaving aside VFS, which is arguably also a filesystem ) on your machine. Your initramfs image is a disk image. Within your initramfs image will be whatever files your distribution decided were crucial enough to ...


3

It always annoys how CentOS/RHEL, by default, on a large hard disk, create a fairly small / partition and a really huge /home partition. This is why, when install CentOS, I always manually partition, and never use LVM (which, I have heard, also reduces performance). LVM makes sense when you want to stream a partition across multiple hard disks, but not as ...


3

You can normally only have four primary partitions on a harddisk, a limitation imposed by the partition table structure. To get around this and get more partitions, the system creates an extended partition, which has its own partition table structure to hold more partitions. The extended partition takes up one of the slots of the primary partitions. I am ...


3

Boot your machine with a live CD, mount your hard drive, chroot to your hard drive and change password. Reboot without the live CD, now your new password should give you access.


3

I think minimum is 8-10 Gb, because there is lot of updates after installation.


3

That depends on when exactly you will do this and what is required to install the driver. The most likely answer is no, it won't be a problem. When a live CD is booted, an initial ramdisk is first loaded which contains most of the tools necessary to run your system. If you are at a prompt, these tools are already loaded and you should be able to remove the ...


3

For the most part, yes it is the same. The real differences you'll encounter when doing this as a host OS (compared to a client VM OS) is that VMs emulate very common hardware. If you real machine uses less common hardware you may need to install drivers which aren't usually needed in a VM. The other difference is going to be your hard drive setup. In a VM ...


3

Use Win32 Disk Imager on Windows or dd to write the ISO to the USB stick on Linux/OSX. dd if=CentOS-7.0-1406-x86_64-NetInstall.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=8m I've recently used the first and it booted fine after doing that.


3

Yes. During installation, on the Desktop Selection page, choose Other, then Minimal Server Selection (Text Mode).


3

the pages at https://tails.boum.org/download/index.en.html#index3h1 explain the process of verifying that the image you download has the expected checksum, the process of verifying that the checksum you read on the website is signed by the distributor, the process of have reasonable evidence that the key you downloaded is indeed not a malicious one. To be ...



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