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16

Is this not how to set up a swap file? I think you missed a step in between chmod and swapon: mkswap /mnt/sda2/swapfile As for the oxymoromic error... swapon: /mnt/sda2/swapfile: read swap header failed: Success What this literally means is there's a bug in the swapon code, but not necessarily one related to its primary functioning. C library ...


11

tune2fs You can use the command tune2fs to find out when the filesystem was created. $ tune2fs -l /dev/main/partition |grep 'Filesystem created' Example $ sudo tune2fs -l /dev/dm-1 |grep 'Filesystem created' Filesystem created: Sat Dec 7 20:42:03 2013 which disk to use? If you don't have /dev/dm-1 you can use the command blkid to determine ...


8

This is possible for syslinux: syslinux ~/floppy.ima The syslinux installer contains enough magic to be run on an unmounted filesystem. (In fact, it is designed to do that.) The extlinux installer expects to be run on a mounted filesystem, though. It is almost certainly possible to split off the extlinux installer into a part that copies the files ...


7

I'm guessing the real problem is that you don't know what a SSID is. It's the technical term for the network's name, i.e. the thing that shows up in a listing of available networks. If you don't know what network you're supposed to connect to, you'll have to ask somebody at your location. As the Arch wiki explains, you can get a list of available networks ...


7

If you cannot choose a language that better correlates to your location, just install with any timezone. When the install is finished, as root, run the command tzselect to set a new timezone. Also, consider filing a bug against the debian installer if you truly cannot pick your language and your timezone properly.


6

The problem was simply that the efivars kernel module was not loaded. This can be confirmed by: sh-4.2# efivar-tester UEFI variables are not supported on this machine. If you are chrooted in to your new install, exit out, and then enable efivars: exit modprobe efivars ...and then chroot back in. In my case, this means: chroot /mnt but you should ...


6

From the Fedora web site, you will need around 10 GB disk space during install. You will probably want more, though, if you are going to have large packages (like LaTeX, games, etc...). 20~30 GB won't hurt and should be enough for most users.


5

tl;dr: it's doable but you will have to work just a little bit. If you don't have the ability to use Ethernet, and are installing from netinst media, you're basically screwed (although if you're really determined you can make it work). When I originally wrote this answer, I'd only done this once, but now I'm doing it again on a different Mac, so I've split ...


5

I'm one of the Anaconda authors/maintainers. I could go into way too much detail about how the installer boots, but I'll try to be brief. (Note that this only applies to RHEL/CentOS 6.x or Fedora 14 and earlier; the installer was almost completely rewritten between Fedora 15, 16, and 17, so things are very different now.) How does Anaconda get ...


5

I found the solution to this issue in the following thread titled: [SOLVED] CentOS 6 on GA-990FXA-UD5. The solution involved removing the BIOS RAID metadata that apparently was part of a residual software RAID that the 40GB HDD must of been used in. Running this command in the CentOS 6.5 LiveCD in a terminal fixed it: $ dmraid -r -E /dev/sda Do you really ...


5

If you add a line in /etc/fstab saying something like: /dev/loop0 /mnt ext4 defaults,user 0 0 you can then mount/unmount /dev/loop0 as a regular user. And if you do chown youruser:youruser <MOUNTPOINT> <LOOPDEVICE> then extlinux , losetup, mkfs, etc can be done as youruser.


4

An OpenBSD install does most of that currently, but you just have to press "enter" a lot. As for doing the pkg_installs and other customizations, there is (and has been for a long time) a mechanism to do that, although it's harder to track down the documentation if you don't know what you are looking for. The installer will pull a sitexx.tgz or ...


4

I believe Logical Volume Manager will do this for you... I have never tried it on SSD's but I don't see why it would not work. install command "apt-get install lvm2" Here is the user guide. http://linuxconfig.org/linux-lvm-logical-volume-manager


4

You are right, even with minimal installation, the current FreeBSD requires a minimum of 600 MB, especially if you go for a amd64 release. There is still some options left: Using an "old" 7.x or 8.x (i386) release I tried to install an "old" 7.3 (i386) with everything to minimal and it took 270 MB. Assuming your machine is old enough, you will not care ...


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


3

You don't need to use Intelligent Provisioning to install Linux onto this server. That's for streamlined installations of ESXi, Windows and such. You say you're installing from "a USB". Is that a USB CD or DVD drive? A USB thumb drive? What did you place onto the media? An .ISO? Try burning a CD and using the internal drive. If there's no internal drive, ...


3

You need to hit E at the GRUB menu. According to the bug report you linked to, the workaround is to add i915.invert_brightness=1 to your kernel parameters. Scroll down to the kernel line and change it to (emphasis mine): linux /boot/x86_64/vmlinuz archisobasedir=arch archisolabel=ARCH_201310 initrd=boot/x86_64/archiso.img i915.invert_brightness=1 To ...


3

Yes, it is possible. But requires a lot of efforts to reach what you want. For details you can check Gobo Linux project. GoboLinux is a free and open source operating system whose most prominent feature is a reorganization of the traditional Linux file system. Rather than following the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard like most Unix-like systems, each ...


3

Debian installs into /target by default. You will have to skip some of the install steps and have a file ready for loopback mounting. Run mkfs.ext2 (or similar) on the file before mounting -o loop. mkdir /target mount /path/to/file /target -o loop Normally, with special purpose installs, I skip the debian installer and use debootstrap and apt: ...


3

The partition layout has zero influence on the speed of the system (unless you have partitions across multiple drives). So choose what makes maintenance easier (which is part of running smooth). Unless you have special needs, create the following filesystems (in addition to swap): / for the operating system /home for user data, unless it's a server that ...


3

If you want to run services in a chroot: that's not really what a chroot is built for. You'd be better off to isolate your Gentoo system in a Docker container. You can easily create a Docker image from your chroot by creating a new baseimage from it: tar --numeric-owner -cf- /gentoo | docker import - gentoo:base Then build a proper Docker imageon top of ...


3

To force a specific order, you need to modify the file /etc/grub.d/10_linux. This file is what specifies which order the distros are listed. If you want to force a certain distribution to be booted by default, then I would change /etc/default/grub and just set the GRUB_DEFAULT parameter to the one that you want to boot first, and then run update-grub


3

When the install is done, and before rebooting, edit /mnt/etc/fstab (the installed system's root is mounted under /mnt during install).


3

That should just work, if you tell Arch-Linux not to write the MBR. Linux Mint should see the new partition and write the new boot menu, replacing the Windows XP entry with Arch Linux. You can be more safe by first saving the boot record under Mint dd if=/dev/sda of=/boot/MBR.img bs=512 count=1


3

I find it very hard to believe that the Fedora installer does not offer this option. In fact, according to this it does. It is probably hidden in an "Advanced" tab somewhere, look around for "Manual partitioning" or similar. Another option would be to resize your partition using something like PartedMagic which will allow you to boot into a live session ...


3

From the CentOS 6.0 Release Notes: 4. Known Issues The text installer has limited capabilities compared to the GUI installer. Most notably there is no support for configuring partition layout, storage methods or package selection. Please refer to the official documentation for details. Here you can find some useful information on creating and using ...


3

You basically have 2 choices if you want to install an alternative OS. ChrUbuntu (traditional dual boot) Crouton (side by side) NOTE: you'll need to enable developer mode, so you'll be forgoing verified boot. These 2 tutorials should get you started. Acer C720 Chromebook How to Install Ubuntu Linux on Your Chromebook with Crouton


3

Since partition E: is, and partition and F: is almost empty, you should (under Windows) move what data you need that is on F: to C: and then delete the E: and F: partitions. That way you create space for a 350Gb+ partition for Linux, which I think should be enough for any DVD install.


3

I want to ensure I have enough swap space to hibernate, what are the simplest steps to achieve this? You'll want at least as much swap space as you have RAM. I'd recommend 50% more if you are used to using most of your memory, since while I have not found any official number, I seem to recall it refusing to work occasionally when they are roughly equal ...


3

It always annoys how CentOS/RHEL, by default, on a large hard disk, create a fairly small / partition and a really huge /home partition. This is why, when install CentOS, I always manually partition, and never use LVM (which, I have heard, also reduces performance). LVM makes sense when you want to stream a partition across multiple hard disks, but not as ...



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