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It depends on which boot-loader was installed. If its a standard Debian install it should be GRUB2. Boot the computer with all disks containing bootable installations attached and powered. you need to open Root Terminal application to open a terminal as root. then enter this commands. apt-get update apt-get install os-prober if os-prober package is ...


3

You could: start the computer with both disks attached, boot into (your currently only choice) Debian run update-grub It should detect Windows on the first Disk, and add an entry to the boot-loader choices. And you could then optionally install grub also to the other disk boot sector by running grub-install /dev/sdb sdb is what I assume to be the ...


1

Here is what worked for me, using Debian jessie (stable). I basically took the instructions from this wiki post, and stripped out all the steps about dual-booting with Windows, since those didn't apply to my case. In the BIOS, set "UEFI only" boot. Using Gparted, create a FAT32 partition at the beginning of the disk with the boot and esp flags. (The Debian ...



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