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6

From the Fedora web site, you will need around 10 GB disk space during install. You will probably want more, though, if you are going to have large packages (like LaTeX, games, etc...). 20~30 GB won't hurt and should be enough for most users.


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


3

I think minimum is 8-10 Gb, because there is lot of updates after installation.


3

For the most part, yes it is the same. The real differences you'll encounter when doing this as a host OS (compared to a client VM OS) is that VMs emulate very common hardware. If you real machine uses less common hardware you may need to install drivers which aren't usually needed in a VM. The other difference is going to be your hard drive setup. In a VM ...


3

That depends on when exactly you will do this and what is required to install the driver. The most likely answer is no, it won't be a problem. When a live CD is booted, an initial ramdisk is first loaded which contains most of the tools necessary to run your system. If you are at a prompt, these tools are already loaded and you should be able to remove the ...


2

I have not installed CentOS 7 myself yet, but you can try linuxefi /images/pxeboot/vmlinuz inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=CentOS\x207\x20x86_64 quiet **nomodeset** If that works, I would blacklist Nouveau after install.


2

Example using wget (for downloading), bfr (for buffering), and growisofs for burning: wget -q -O - http://somewhere/image.iso \ | bfr -b 512m -p -i 100% -m 10% -t 120 -T 95% \ | growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/cdrom=/dev/fd/0 The buffering part is optional, but without it you will have to rely on your drive to cope with buffer underruns. That doesn't work ...


1

I would sum it up this way : the base procedure will be exactly the same, though the results may differ. Here's where you may find the most significant changes : Drives configuration : your physical drive does not use the same technology, and does not have the same properties (size, ...) as the virtual one. Still, partitioning, formatting and mounting are ...


1

I was installing arch Linux over a previous Linux installation. Once I'd wiped the filesystem it all worked.


1

You are using the mint4win installer based on Wubi. This creates a hard file in Windows for installation: Wubi is the Windows Linux Mint Installer. Wubi installs Linux Mint inside a file within a Windows partition, and thus it does not require CD burning or dedicated partitions, yet the installation is a dual boot setup identical to a normal ...


1

After I shrunk the volume in Windows by a disappointing amount, the option to shrink the volume in the Fedora 20 installer became available allowing me to shrink it down by much more. Shrink the volume in Windows 1. Boot into Windows 2. Go to "Disk Management"     a. Right click "Computer" from the desktop or Start Menu ...



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